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Black magic

Black magic
History[edit] Like its counterpart white magic, the origins of black magic can be traced to the primitive, ritualistic worship of spirits as outlined in Robert M. Place's 2009 book, Magic and Alchemy.[3] Unlike white magic, in which Place sees parallels with primitive shamanistic efforts to achieve closeness with spiritual beings, the rituals that developed into modern "black magic" were designed to invoke those same spirits to produce beneficial outcomes for the practitioner. Place also provides a broad modern definition of both black and white magic, preferring instead to refer to them as "high magic" (white) and "low magic" (black) based primarily on intentions of the practitioner employing them. He acknowledges, though, that this broader definition (of "high" and "low") suffers from prejudices as good-intentioned folk magic may be considered "low" while ceremonial magic involving expensive or exclusive components may be considered by some as "high magic", regardless of intent.[3] Related:  intriguing

Azoth Basis[edit] Azoth is the essential agent of transformation in alchemy. It is the name given by ancient alchemists to Mercury, the animating spirit hidden in all matter that makes transmutation possible. The spelling consists of the initial letter of the English, Greek and Hebrew alphabets followed by the final letters of the English alphabet (Z), the Greek alphabet (Omega) and the Hebrew alphabet (Tau). The word comes from the Arabic al-zā'būq which means "Mercury". The word occurs in the writings of many early alchemists, such as Zosimos, Mary the Jewess, Olympiodorus, and Jābir ibn Hayyān (Geber). In texts[edit] The word Azoth is also related to the Ain Soph (ultimate substance) of the Kabbalah. In his book Transcendental Magic, Eliphas Levi wrote: "The Azoth or Universal Medicine is, for the soul, is supreme reason and absolute justice; for the mind, it is mathematical and practical truth; for the body it is the quintessence, which is a combination of gold and light. See also[edit]

Helm of Awe Witchcraft The belief in and the practice of magic has been present since the earliest human cultures and continues to have an important religious and medicinal role in many cultures today.[1] "Magic is central not only in 'primitive' societies but in 'high cultural' societies as well..."[2] The concept of witchcraft as harmful is often treated as a cultural ideology providing a scapegoat for human misfortune.[3][4] This was particularly the case in the early modern period of Europe where witchcraft came to be seen as part of a vast diabolical conspiracy of individuals in league with the Devil undermining Christianity, eventually leading to large-scale witch-hunts, especially in Protestant Europe. Etymology[edit] From the Old English wiccecræft, compound of "wicce" ("witch") and "cræft" ("craft").[7] Definitions[edit] As in anthropology, European witchcraft is seen by historians as an ideology for explaining misfortune; however, this ideology manifested in diverse ways. Demonology[edit] By region[edit]

Kalku Description[edit] The kalku is a semi-mythical character that has the power of working with wekufe "spirits or wicked creatures". An example of a wekufe is the Nguruvilu. The kalku also have as servants other beings such as the Anchimayen, or the Chonchon (which is the magical manifestation of the more powerful kalku). A mapuche kalku is usually an inherited role, although it could be a machi that is interested in lucrative ends, or a "less powerful", frustrated machi who ignores the laws of the admapu (the rules of the Mapuches). See also[edit] References[edit] Ana Mariella Bacigalupo.Shamans of the foye tree: gender, power, and healing among Chilean Mapuche. External links[edit]

Ananda yoga Ananda Yoga, or Ananda Yoga for Higher Awareness[1] is a system of Hatha Yoga established by Kriyananda, a disciple of Paramahansa Yogananda, and is based on his Kriya Yoga teachings. Ananda Yoga emphasizes inner awareness; energy control; and the experience of each asana as a natural expression of a higher state of consciousness, which is enhanced by the use of affirmations. History[edit] Ananda Yoga was established from one of the oldest Hatha Yoga systems in the West. Principles[edit] Ananda Yoga uses asana and pranayama to awaken, experience, and control the subtle energies (prana) within oneself, especially the energies of the chakras. Energization exercises[edit] The "Energization Exercises", a vital part of Ananda Yoga, are Yogananda's contribution to the science of yoga. References[edit]

Adinkra symbols Adinkra are visual symbols, originally created by the Ashanti, that represent concepts or aphorisms. Adinkra are used extensively in fabrics, pottery, logos and advertising. They are incorporated into walls and other architectural features. Fabric adinkra are often made by woodcut sign writing as well as screen printing. Adinkra symbols appear on some traditional akan gold weights. The symbols are also carved on stools for domestic and ritual use. Calabash adinkra stamps carved in Ntonso, Ashanti. The symbols have a decorative function but also represent objects that encapsulate evocative messages that convey traditional wisdom, aspects of life or the environment. History[edit] Ashanti oral tradition dates the arrival of adinkra among the Ashanti to the end of the 1818 Asante–Gyaman War. Adinkra cloth[edit] Adinkra cloths were traditionally only worn by royalty and spiritual leaders for funerals and other very special occasions. Symbols listed by Rattray[edit] Notes[edit]

Witchcraft The belief in and the practice of magic has been present since the earliest human cultures and continues to have an important religious and medicinal role in many cultures today.[1] "Magic is central not only in 'primitive' societies but in 'high cultural' societies as well.. The concept of witchcraft as harmful is often treated as a cultural ideology providing a scapegoat for human misfortune.[3][4] This was particularly the case in the early modern period of Europe where witchcraft came to be seen as part of a vast diabolical conspiracy of individuals in league with the Devil undermining Christianity, eventually leading to large-scale witch-hunts, especially in Protestant Europe. Etymology[edit] From the Old English wiccecræft, compound of "wicce" ("witch") and "cræft" ("craft").[7] Definitions[edit] As in anthropology, European witchcraft is seen by historians as an ideology for explaining misfortune; however, this ideology manifested in diverse ways. Demonology[edit] White witches[edit]

Hecate Name[edit] The etymology of the name Hecate (Ἑκάτη, Hekátē) is not known . Suggested derivations include: From the Greek word for 'will'.[8]From Ἑκατός Hekatos, an obscure epithet of Apollo.[9] This has been translated as "she that operates from afar", "she that removes or drives off",[10] "the far reaching one" or "the far-darter".[11]the name of the Egyptian goddess of childbirth, Heqet, has been compared.[12] In Early Modern English, the name was also pronounced disyllabic and sometimes spelled Hecat. The spelling Hecat is due to Arthur Golding's 1567 translation of Ovid's Metamorphoses,[13] and this spelling without the final E later appears in plays of the Elizabethan-Jacobean period.[14] Noah Webster in 1866 particularly credits the influence of Shakespeare for the then-predominant disyllabic pronunciation of the name.[15] Representations[edit] Statuette of Triple-bodied Hekate. The earliest Greek depictions of Hecate are single faced, not three-formed. Mythology[edit]

Shapeshifting The concept is present in antiquity, and may indeed be a human cultural universal. It is present in the oldest forms of totemism or shamanism, as well as the oldest extant literature and epic poems (such as the Gilgamesh Epic or the Iliad). The shape-shifting is usually induced by the act of a deity; it persisted into the literature of the Middle Ages and the modern period (where the agency causing shape-shifting is mostly a sorcerer or witch). It remains a common trope in modern fantasy, children's literature, and works of pop culture. By far the most common form of shape-shifting is therianthropy which is the transformation of a human being into an animal (or conversely of an animal into human form). Themes in shapeshifting[edit] Shapeshifting may be used as a plot device, such as when Puss in Boots in the movie Shrek 2 tricks the ogre, Shrek, into becoming a mouse to be eaten. Examples of this are in fairy tales. Between the sexes[edit] Mythology[edit] Modern fiction[edit] L.

Spirit guide "Spirit guide" is a term used by the Western tradition of Spiritualist Churches, mediums, and psychics to describe an entity that remains a disincarnate spirit in order to act as a guide or protector to a living incarnated human being. Traditionally, within the spiritualist churches, spirit guides were often stereotyped ethnically, with Native Americans, Chinese or Egyptians being popular for their perceived ancient wisdom. Other popular types of guides were saints or other enlightened individuals. Description[edit] According to theosophical doctrine, spirit guides are not always of human descent. Some early modern Spiritualists did not favor the idea of spirit guides. Firsthand Accounts[edit] Many well-known psychics have publicly described their guides. See also[edit] References[edit]

Photon belt The Photon Belt (also called the Photon Band, Photon Ring, Manasic Ring, or Golden Nebula) is a spiritual belief, largely linked to some parts of the New Age Movement. It postulates that a belt or ring of photons is going to envelop the Earth, causing a cataclysm and/or initiating a spiritual transition, with the time period leading up to "the Shift" referred to as "The Quickening." The concept of the Photon Belt also ties into various phenomena including belief in extraterrestrial intelligence and 2012 millenarianism. Concept[edit] The core of the Photon Belt beliefs is that there is an immense belt of photons orbiting around the Pleiades. According to some New Age beliefs, Earth will pass through this belt of photons, resulting either in humanity's elevation to a higher plane of existence, the end of the world, or both. History[edit] A number of predictions have been made as to the date of Earth's collision with the Photon Belt. Criticism[edit] References[edit]

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