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Triumph des Willens (1935) - Triumph of the Will

Triumph des Willens (1935) - Triumph of the Will
Related:  The Holocaust & Nazi Germany: for students & teacherswar

Poetry in Hell - Poems from the Holocaust The Wipers Times, BBC Two, review An enraged staff officer brandished a copy of The Wipers Times, the jokey paper produced in the trenches of the First World War, and said to the General (played by Michael Palin): “The war is not funny, Sir.” To which the General replied: “I've a feeling that may be the point.” A few minutes into The Wipers Times (BBC Two), a 90-minute drama by Ian Hislop and Nick Newman (both veterans of Private Eye), I was worried that it would simply prove a self-indulgent jape to tinkling music. Thank heaven, it did not. Historically, the trenches of Ypres and the Somme were an unreal world blown featureless. Another artificiality of the trench-world was its exclusive masculinity. I shed a tear at that. Dominating the story was Captain Fred Roberts (later Lieutenant-Colonel), editor of the paper, masterfully played by Ben Chaplin with a morning-after croak and an air of incipient insubordination fearless of consequences.

The H.E.A.R.T Holocaust Research Project Table Of Contents It was once said that not remembering the Holocaust means to side with the executioners against its victims; not to remember means to kill the victims a second time; not to remember means to become an accomplice of the enemy. On the other hand, to remember means to feel compassion for the victims of all persecutions. By solemnly commemorating the tragedy of the Holocaust, we will keep history in mind, never forget the past, cherish all lives, and create a better future. Millions of souls were lost during the years of Nazi tyranny, and their passing has made the world a poorer place. Many say "Never Again" while shrugging off the memory of the starving, the sick, and the dead. But the Holocaust did happen, and this is one reality that cannot be denied. We seek to bring that reality to the forefront of the minds of all who seek the truth.

For a primer on how to make fun of Nazis, look to Charlie Chaplin White nationalists and neo-Nazis are having their moment. Former Ku Klux Klan Imperial Wizard David Duke is back, yet again, in the media spotlight, while newer figures such as white supremacist Richard Spencer and Christopher Cantwell are broadcasting their views via social media feeds and niche internet channels. Many Americans are wondering if this resurgent movement should be ignored, feared or fought. What about laughter? While the August 12 violence in Charlottesville, Virginia was no joke, the images of armor-clad, tiki-torch-wielding white nationalists did give fodder to late-night talk show hosts and editorial cartoonists. In a different age, another ascendant white supremacist – Adolf Hitler – used a combination of garbled ideas, stagy phrasing and arch gestures to bewitch much of his nation, even as the rest of the world looked on in disbelief and terror. Chaplin homes in on his target In late 1940, producer-director-star Charlie Chaplin released “The Great Dictator.”

Roman Vishniac Archive | International Center of Photography Lesson Plans - Elementary Middle High School - Classroom Materials Lesson Plans These lesson plans cover some of the central themes of the Holocaust, detailing how they can be approached in the classroom. This page will be updated from time to time, as the staff at the International School for Holocaust Studies prepares new material. More materials for use in the classroom are available on our Learning Environments page. These include more open-ended teacher's guides and interactive activities. For elementary school students (ages 9-12) “Until Then I Had Only Read about These Things in Books..” - The Story of Uri Orlev This lesson plan highlights the personal story of Uri Orlev, a Holocaust survivor, who became a writer and translator in Israel. I Wanted to Fly Like a Butterfly This lesson plan features the book of the same name, which presents the personal story of Hannah Gofrit. For middle school students (ages 13-15) Written in Pencil in the Sealed Freightcar: A Poem by Dan Pagis (1930-1986) - A Teacher’s Guide for Using the Poem and Four Biblical Verses

The Holocaust Explained - Homework & Online Education Tool for Students The Holocaust The genocide perpetrated against European Jews during World War II carries several names. In the west we generally know it as the Holocaust, a word taken from an ancient Greek term meaning ‘everything burned’. Many Jews know it as Shoah, a Hebrew word meaning ‘catastrophe’. The Nazis who carried out this mass murder used its benign operational title: the ‘Final Solution to the Jewish Question in Europe’. But none of these names and labels conveys the enormity of this disastrous event, the complexity of its causes or the oceans of human suffering and despair it created. Under the cloak of war, the Nazis manufactured an ideology then an apparatus to achieve the extermination of an entire race. Mass murder on this scale does not happen for incidental or transient reasons, even in the fires of war. The age of Enlightenment and modernism should have rendered anti-Semitism a forgotten prejudice from a distant time. Anti-Semitism continued to simmer beneath the surface of European society.

Nazi Germany The webserver at Alpha History tells us you’re using an adblocking tool, plug-in or browser extension on your computer or network. We understand that many people don’t like web-based advertising. Ads on websites can often be irrelevant, distracting and ‘in your face’. Without ads, however, our website would not exist – or it would not be free. Ads are how we fund the creation and delivery of our content. If you would like to use our website and its resources, please disable your adblocker or whitelist our website. To access the Alpha History website, please complete one of the following steps: * Disable or deactivate your adblocking software, tool or plug-in. * Whitelist our top level domain (alphahistory.com) in your adblocking software. Thank you for your understanding. Have a nice day! Alpha History staff

The Weimar Republic The webserver at Alpha History tells us you’re using an adblocking tool, plug-in or browser extension on your computer or network. We understand that many people don’t like web-based advertising. Ads on websites can often be irrelevant, distracting and ‘in your face’. Without ads, however, our website would not exist – or it would not be free. If you would like to use our website and its resources, please disable your adblocker or whitelist our website. To access the Alpha History website, please complete one of the following steps: * Disable or deactivate your adblocking software, tool or plug-in. * Whitelist our top level domain (alphahistory.com) in your adblocking software. Thank you for your understanding. Have a nice day! Alpha History staff

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