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10 Lessons from Einstein

10 Lessons from Einstein

http://paulocoelhoblog.com/2012/03/16/10-lessons-from-einstein/

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5 Lessons In UI Design, From A Breakthrough Museum Museums today compete for attention in a wildly difficult environment: If you’re a youngster, why stare at a Greek urn when you could blow one up in a video game? One institution thinking deeply about the challenge is the Cleveland Museum of Art, which this month unveiled a series of revamped galleries, designed by Local Projects, which feature cutting-edge interactivity. But the technology isn’t the point. "We didn’t want to create a tech ghetto," says David Franklin, the museum’s director. Adds Local Projects founder

» How Routines Make Goals Achievable Can one simple idea give you consistent progress on any goal? Every week? Without massive willpower? Even when your motivation is waning and you just don’t feel like you have the energy? Or if you start doubting yourself? Study Finds Exercise Literally Makes Your Brain Grow Scientists know that exercise can foster the growth of new brain cells, but the factors responsible for this phenomenon have not been well understood. In a recent study, researchers have discovered the chemical process that makes this happen. What’s more is that they may be able to “bottle” the chemical that produces this benefit, so a brain-growth pill may be coming to your drug store in the future. Exercise and the Brain A part of the brain particularly receptive to new nerve cell growth in response to endurance exercise is the hippocampus, which is a structure associated with learning and memory.

7 Body Language Tricks To Make Anyone Instantly Like You There’s no question that body language is important. And, according to Leil Lowndes in her book “How To Talk To Anyone,” you can capture — and hold — anyone’s attention without even saying a word. We’ve selected the best body language techniques from the book and shared them below: The Flooding Smile “Don’t flash an immediate smile when you greet someone,” says Lowndes. A Playful 3-D Puzzle That Becomes A Working Radio Despite how often we use our electronic devices, most of us don’t have much of an idea of what goes on inside them. Soldering, circuitry, silicon--it all seems technical and intimidating, and until we’re in some sort of post-apocalyptic situation in which I need to fashion an emergency radio out of a coat hanger and some old cellphone parts, I’m pretty much okay with leaving the guts inside the gadgets. But as part of the designers in residence program at the London Design Museum, Japansese designer Yuri Suzuki, in conjunction with the electronics education group Technology Will Save Us, made those guts the star of the show. Their collaborative project, the Denki Puzzle, turns circuitry into something that you actually want to play with. The Puzzle is a set of custom-designed printed circuit board pieces that can be arranged to create a few basic devices, namely a light and a radio. [Hat Tip designboom]

6 Examples Of Psychological Projection We All Commit by ALETHEIA LUNA | Loner Wolf I tend to make assumptions a lot, about everything and everyone. While I have mostly learned the hard way that most people don’t actually think, feel and reason the same way I do, I realized long ago that the tendency to make assumptions is a form of naivety that we are all born with to some extent. 7 Lessons From 7 Great Minds Have you ever wished you could go back in time and have a conversation with one of the greatest minds in history? Well, you can’t sorry, they’re dead. Unless of course you’re clairaudient, be my guest. But for the rest of us, we can still refer to the words they left behind. What Schools Can Learn From Google, IDEO, and Pixar A community about to build or rehab a school often creates checklists of best practices, looks for furniture that matches its mascot, and orders shiny new lockers to line its corridors. These are all fine steps, but the process of planning and designing a new school requires both looking outward (to the future, to the community, to innovative corporate powerhouses) as well as inward (to the playfulness and creativity that are at the core of learning). In many ways, what makes the Googles of the world exceptional begins in the childhood classroom -- an embrace of creativity, play, and collaboration. It was just one year ago that 1,500 CEOs identified creativity as the number-one leadership competency in our complex global marketplace. We can no longer afford to teach our kids or design their schoolhouses the way we used to if we’re to maintain a competitive edge. [Photos by Steve Hall]

13 Things to Remember If You Love A Person With Anxiety Anxiety is tough, isn’t it? Not just for the people that have it, but for you – the people that stick with them – while they’re going through it. It’s emotionally taxing on both ends, it’s physically demanding at times, and of course mentally demanding most of the time. Plans have to be changed to accommodate the anxiety. Situations have to be avoided at times. Why Procrastinators Procrastinate PDF: We made a fancy PDF of this post for printing and offline viewing. Buy it here. (Or see a preview.) Infographic of the Day: Even Poor Countries Can Excel in Education Sitting comfortable in our first-world lives, it's easy to assume that we've got the best of everything. And it's easy to assume that problems of infant mortality, hunger and education are simply a matter of having a roaring GDP. But that's not true at all, as these remarkable interactive graphs show. Produced by The Guardian and the Gates Foundation, the charts are draw from the Millennium Development Report Card. Basically, it shows how well countries are performing on key development metrics, relative to their GDP.

Psychological Projection: Dealing With Undesirable Emotions Other common defense mechanisms include: Denial - Refusing to admit to yourself that something is real (e.g., not believing the doctor when she tells you some particularly bad news about your health). Distortion - Changing the reality of a situation to suit your needs (e.g., thinking that your boyfriend cheated on you because he was scared of commitment). Passive Aggression - Indirectly acting out your aggression (e.g., purposely parking in your co-worker’s parking spot as retribution for a previous dispute). Repression - Covering up feelings or emotions instead of coming to terms with them (e.g., being unable to recall the details of a car crash you were involved in – the brain sometimes purposely “loses” these memories to help you cope). Sublimination - Converting negative feelings into positive actions (e.g., cleaning the house whenever you are angry about something).

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