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Blade Runner

Blade Runner
Blade Runner is a 1982 American neo-noir dystopian science fiction film directed by Ridley Scott and starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, and Edward James Olmos. The screenplay, written by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, is a modified film adaptation of the 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. The film depicts a dystopian Los Angeles in November 2019, in which genetically engineered replicants, which are visually indistinguishable from adult humans, are manufactured by the powerful Tyrell Corporation as well as by other "mega-corporations" around the world. Blade Runner initially polarized critics: some were displeased with the pacing, while others enjoyed its thematic complexity. Seven versions of the film have been shown for various markets as a result of controversial changes made by film executives. Plot[edit] Deckard begins his investigation at the Tyrell Corporation to ensure that the test works on Nexus-6 models. Themes[edit] Related:  7ème art - Films

Gandhi (film) Gandhi is a 1982 epic biographical film which dramatises the life of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, the leader of India's non-violent, non-cooperative independence movement against the United Kingdom's rule of the country during the 20th century. Gandhi was a collaboration of British and Indian production companies[3] and was written by John Briley and produced and directed by Richard Attenborough. It stars Ben Kingsley in the titular role. The film covers Gandhi's life from a defining moment in 1893, as he is thrown off a South African train for being in a whites-only compartment, and concludes with his assassination and funeral in 1948. Although a practising Hindu, Gandhi's embracing of other faiths, particularly Christianity and Islam, is also depicted. Gandhi was released in India on 30 November 1982, in the United Kingdom on 3 December 1982, and in the United States on 6 December 1982. The early life of Gandhi is not depicted in the film. 55th Academy Awards

Alien 2 (Italian film) The film features a score by Guido De Angelis and Maurizio De Angelis, performed by the composers under the pseudonym Oliver Onions. Midnight Legacy released the film on DVD and Blu-ray on March 22, 2011. Plot[edit] Thelma and her husband Roy meet up with their friends at a bowling alley. After a short gambling session, the group leaves to go explore a cave. The group stops at a roadside café to buy food and change into their caving gear. The group finally arrives at the cave, and quickly rapells to the bottom to set up camp for the night. The next day, Thelma's friend Jill discovers the blue rock that Burt dropped while rapelling the previous day. Roy rapells down into a hole and finds Jill, alive and with her face intact. The creature quickly grows into a mature shape-shifting alien creatures which incubate inside human hosts, and slaughters the group one by one, multiplying with each kill. Thelma and Roy finally get back to the city, but strangely, they can't find anyone. Cast[edit]

Babylon A.D. Babylon A.D. is a 2008 French American science fiction action film based on the novel Babylon Babies by Maurice Georges Dantec. The film was directed by Mathieu Kassovitz and stars Vin Diesel. It was released on 29 August 2008 in the United States. Plot[edit] In 2058, a mercenary named Toorop (Vin Diesel) accepts a contract from a Russian mobster, Gorsky (Gérard Depardieu), who instructs him to bring a young woman known only as Aurora (Mélanie Thierry) to New York City. In order to reach this goal, Gorsky gives Toorop a variety of weapons as well as a UN passport that has to be injected under the skin of the neck. The towns and cities of Russia have been turned into dangerous, overpopulated slums by war and terrorist activity, forcing Toorop, Aurora, and Rebeka to face dangers of the human element, while fleeing from an unknown group of mercenaries claiming to have been sent by Aurora's supposedly dead father. Later, they board a submarine that carries refugees to Canada. Cast[edit]

Rock (1996 Top 50 Dystopian Movies of All Time Massive dehumanization, totalitarian government, rampant disease, post-apocalyptic terrains, cyber-genetic technologies, societal chaos and widespread urban violence are some of the common themes in dystopian films which bravely examine the ominous shadow cast by future. A dystopia is a fictional society that is the antithesis or complete opposite of a utopia, an ideal world with a perfect social, political and technological infrastructure. A world without chaos, strife or hunger. In contrast, the dystopian world is undesirable with poverty and unequal domination by specific individuals over others. Ranking the List We thought it would be interesting if we could coagulate the most commonly cited dystopian movies and rank them not to preference, but to an average score made up of both Rotten Tomatoes (RT) and IMDB ratings. We’ve taken both ratings, added them together and found an average score for each film. 50. In the nation of Libria, there is always peace among men. 49. 48. 47. 46.

Cliffhanger, traque au sommet (1993 ALL-TIME 100 Movies - TIME You like us, you really like us. You also hate us. Anyway, you click on us, which is the surest way a website has of measuring interest in its content. The All-TIME 100 Movies feature—compiled by Richard Schickel and me, and handsomely packaged by Josh Macht, Mark Coatney and all the smart folks at TIME.com—attracted a record-busting 7.8 million page views in its first week, including 3.5 million on May 23rd, its opening daym, in time for Father’s Day. Thousands of readers have written in to cheer or challenge our selections, and thousands more have voted for their own favorites. The idea was to assemble 100 estimable films since TIME began, with the March 3, 1923 issue. Not so simple, in fact, for we faced a couple of complications. Why do the list? LISTOMANIA I feel one of my grand gender generalizations coming on, and I can’t resist it, so here goes. As with baseball, so with favorite movies, TV shows, comics. I too was a teenage listmaker. But, pardon me, we’re better. Ah, Leone.

SimplyScripts - Movie Scripts and Screenplays Starship Troopers (film) Starship Troopers is a 1997 American military science fiction action film directed by Paul Verhoeven and written by Edward Neumeier, originally from an unrelated script called Bug Hunt at Outpost Nine,[2] but eventually licensing the name Starship Troopers, from a science fiction novel by Robert A. Heinlein. It is the only theatrically released film in the Starship Troopers franchise. The film had a budget estimated around $105 million and grossed over $121 million worldwide. Starship Troopers was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects at the 70th Academy Awards in 1998. In 2012, Slant Magazine ranked the film #20 on its list of the 100 Best Films of the 1990s.[4] At Mobile Infantry training, brutal Career Sergeant Zim leads the recruits. The first strike on Klendathu is a disaster, with heavy casualties. As Rico's Roughnecks join the mission, the Fleet encounters fire from the Bugs and Carmen's ship is destroyed. Starship Troopers polarized audiences and critics alike.

Pay it forward Pay it forward is an expression for describing the beneficiary of a good deed repaying it to others instead of to the original benefactor. The concept is old, but the phrase may have been coined by Lily Hardy Hammond in her 1916 book In the Garden of Delight.[1] "Pay it forward" is implemented in contract law of loans in the concept of third party beneficiaries. Specifically, the creditor offers the debtor the option of paying the debt forward by lending it to a third person instead of paying it back to the original creditor. This contract may include the provision that the debtor may repay the debt in kind, lending the same amount to a similarly disadvantaged party once they have the means, and under the same conditions. History[edit] Pay it forward was used as a key plot element in the denouement of a New Comedy play by Menander, Dyskolos (a title which can be translated as "The Grouch"). I do not pretend to give such a deed; I only lend it to you. Robert Heinlein's contribution[edit]

Peter Weyland at TED2023: I will change the world Peter Weyland has been a magnet for controversy since he announced his intent to build the first convincingly humanoid robotic system by the end of the decade. Whether challenging the ethical boundaries of medicine with nanotechnology or going toe to toe with the Vatican itself on the issue of gene-therapy sterilization, Sir Peter prides himself on his motto, “If we can, we must.” After a three year media blackout, Weyland has finally emerged to reveal where he’s heading next. Wherever that may be, we will most certainly want to follow. Conceived and designed by Ridley Scott and Damon Lindelof and directed by Luke Scott. Sir Peter Weyland was born in Mumbai, India at the turn of the Millennium. In less than a decade, Weyland Corporation became a worldwide leader in emerging technologies and launched the first privatized industrial mission to leave the planet Earth.

A “Close Reading” of Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” | West Coast Odysseus Preamble* A few weeks ago and for the first time I watched Stanley Kubrick’s 1968 movie 2001: A Space Odyssey in segments on Youtube. It made such a powerful impression on me that I immediately bought the DVD. I also found the Wikipedia webpage on the movie; I skipped the plot summary, but wanted to read about the reception of the movie, and was pleased to see that it was considered the best movie of all time by one critical journal, and usually places in the “top ten” lists of others. The scale of 2001 is worthy of its scope: the universe, and the development of humanity in this universe; the playback time corresponds to this magnitude of scale, for the movie runs to 148 minutes in length. The beginning of 2001: A Space Odyssey is a lengthy one, with scary organ music playing for about three minutes; the entire screen is dark during this time. The Dawn of Man While waiting for his connecting flight to Clavius on the moon, Dr. Dr. The conversation ended, we next see Dr. Dr.

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