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Solar panel made with ion cannon is cheap enough to challenge fossil fuels

Solar panel made with ion cannon is cheap enough to challenge fossil fuels
Twin Creeks, a solar power startup that emerged from hiding today, has developed a way of creating photovoltaic cells that are half the price of today’s cheapest cells, and thus within reach of challenging the fossil fuel hegemony. The best bit: Twin Creeks’ photovoltaic cells are created using a hydrogen ion particle accelerator. As it stands, almost every solar panel is made by slicing a 200-micrometer-thick (0.2mm) wafer from a block of crystalline silicon. You then add some electrodes, cover it in protective glass, and leave it in a sunny area to generate electricity through the photovoltaic effect (when photons hit the silicon, it excites the electrons and generates a charge). This is where Twin Creeks’ ion cannon, dubbed Hyperion, comes into play. According to Technology Review, ion beams have been considered before, but particle accelerators were simply too expensive to be commercially viable. Read more at Twin Creeks Related:  Clean Energy

Rawlemon’s Spherical Solar Energy-Generating Globes Can Even Harvest Energy from Moonlight The solar energy designers at Rawlemon have created a spherical, sun-tracking glass globe that is able to concentrate sunlight (and moonlight) up to 10,000 times. The company claims that its ß.torics system is 35% more efficient than traditional dual-axis photovoltaic designs, and the fully rotational, weatherproof sphere is even capable of harvesting electricity from moonlight. The ß.torics system was invented by Barcelona-based German Architect André Broessel. The spheres are able to concentrate diffused moonlight into a steady source of energy. + Rawlemon Via Designboom

HEB Home Peru Solar Power Program To Give Electricity To 2 Million Of Poorest Peruvians Clean Power Published on July 15th, 2013 | by Important Media Cross-Post July 15th, 2013 by Important Media Cross-Post This article was originally published on Planetsave.By Don Lieber Peru last week initiated a new program that will provide electricity to more than two million of its poorest residents using solar panels. Energy and Mining Minister Jorge Merino said that the program will allow 95% of Peru to have access to electricity by the end of 2016. “This program is aimed at the poorest people, those who lack access to electric lighting and still use oil lamps, spending their own resources to pay for fuels that harm their health,” said Merino. The first phase of the program, called “The National Photovoltaic Household Electrification Program” was initiated on Monday (July 8) in the Contumaza province, where 1,601 solar panels were installed. Peru is the third-largest country in South America, with a population over 24 million.

A Urine Powered Generator : Maker Faire Africa Posted on Tuesday, November 6, 2012 · 168 Comments Possibly one of the more unexpected products at Maker Faire Africa this year in Lagos is a urine powered generator, created by four girls. The girls are Duro-Aina Adebola (14), Akindele Abiola (14), Faleke Oluwatoyin (14) and Bello Eniola (15). 1 Liter of urine gives you 6 hours of electricity. The system works like this: Urine is put into an electrolytic cell, which separates out the hydrogen. Along the whole way there are one-way valves for security, but let’s be honest that this is something of an explosive device… Biomimicry Pictures: Nature Yields New Ideas for Renewable Energy and Efficiency how a stirling engine works Stirling engine example BUY A HUGE FRESNEL LENS GREEN POWER SCIENCE WOULD BE NICE ON THE DISCOVERY NETWORK SOLAR STIRLING ENGINES FRESNEL LENS PARABOLIC MIRROR

Student Creates Electromagnetic Harvester That Gathers Free Electricity From Thin Air A German student has built an electromagnetic harvester that recharges an AA battery by soaking up ambient, environmental radiation. These harvesters can gather free electricity from just about anything, including overhead power lines, coffee machines, refrigerators, or even the emissions from your WiFi router or smartphone. This might sound a bit like hocus-pocus pseudoscience, but the underlying science is actually surprisingly sound. We are, after all, just talking about wireless power transfer — just like the smartphones that are starting to ship with wireless charging tech, and the accompanying charging pads. Dennis Siegel, of the University of Arts Bremen, does away with the charging pad, but the underlying tech is fundamentally the same. In essence, every electrical device gives off electromagnetic radiation — and if that radiation passes across a coil of wire, an electrical current is produced. As a concept, though, Siegel’s electromagnetic harvester is very interesting. Related:

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3D solar panels can produce 20 times more energy than flat panels We see the trend in 3D technology everywhere: Movie theaters, home theaters, game consoles, 3D printers. But researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology recently discovered that creating a 3D-inspired solar panel not only help to keep up with the trends, it could draw in 20 times more energy than flat panel designs. Traditional solar panels lay flat on a surface or rooftop, facing the sun to collect energy. “I think this concept could become an important part of the future of photovoltaics,” said Jeffrey Grossman, the Carl Richard Soderberg Career Development Associate Professor of Power Engineering at MIT and one of the project’s leaders. The accordion-style arrays also work better because they receive solar energy from all angles rather than in just one direction. Researchers also say the tower style panel helps save space by standing vertically, and the design will be easier to manufacture than the cubes.

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