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Charles Eisenstein

Charles Eisenstein
Subscribe to Charles Newsletter Connect on Facebook Read Online Welcome to the HTML version of Sacred Economics. The full version is here in English, along with full and partial translations into other languages. More translated material comes on-line all the time, so check back often. Sacred Economics Full text of Sacred Economics in Romanian can be found here. Introduction: (German) (Swedish) (French) (Hungarian) (Italian) (Dutch) (Greek) (Polish) Chapter 1: The Gift World (German)(Swedish) (Polish) (Dutch) (Italian)(Greek – Part 1)(Greek – Part 2) Chapter 2: Greed and the Illusion of Scarcity (German) (Swedish) (Polish) (Dutch) (Greek Part 1) (Greek Part 2) Chapter 3: Money and the Mind (German) (Swedish) (Polish)(Dutch) (Greek Part 1) (Greek Part 2) Chapter 4: The Trouble with Property (German) (Swedish) (Polish) (Greek Part 1)(Greek Part 2) Chapter 5: The Corpse of the Commons (German) (Swedish) (Polish) (Greek Part 1) (Greek Part 2) Chapter 23: A New Materialism (German) (Swedish)(Greek)

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Four Arguments on Sacred Economics A summary of the main proposals in Charles Eistenstein’s book, Sacred Economics. Excerpted from Devin Martin: ” I would like to offer a brief summary and commentary on four key ideas contained in his work. I highly recommend you investigate further. Whether or not one agrees with Eisenstein’s ideas is second to the fact that these are the conversations we need to be having. First the Seed The Political Economy of Plant Biotechnology Jack Ralph Kloppenburg, Jr. Publication Year: 2004 Leverage Points: Places to Intervene in a System By Donella Meadows~ Folks who do systems analysis have a great belief in “leverage points.” These are places within a complex system (a corporation, an economy, a living body, a city, an ecosystem) where a small shift in one thing can produce big changes in everything. This idea is not unique to systems analysis — it’s embedded in legend. The silver bullet, the trimtab, the miracle cure, the secret passage, the magic password, the single hero who turns the tide of history. The nearly effortless way to cut through or leap over huge obstacles.

Max-Neef Model of Human-Scale Development Kath Fisher: "Manfred Max-Neef is a Chilean economist who has worked for many years with the problem of development in the Third World, articulating the inappropriateness of conventional models of development, that have lead to increasing poverty, massive debt and ecological disaster for many Third World communities. He works for the Centre for Development Alternatives in Chile, an organisation dedicated to the reorientation of development which stimulates local needs. It researches new tools, strategies and evaluative techniques to support such development, and Max-Neef's publication Human Scale Development: an Option for the Future (1987) outlines the results of the Centre’s researches and experiences Max-Neef and his colleagues have developed a taxonomy of human needs and a process by which communities can identify their "wealths" and "poverties" according to how these needs are satisfied.

Silent Spring Silent Spring is an environmental science book written by Rachel Carson and published by Houghton Mifflin on September 27, 1962.[1] The book documented the detrimental effects on the environment—particularly on birds—of the indiscriminate use of pesticides. Carson accused the chemical industry of spreading disinformation and public officials of accepting industry claims unquestioningly. In the late 1950s, Carson turned her attention to conservation, especially environmental problems that she believed were caused by synthetic pesticides. The result was Silent Spring (1962), which brought environmental concerns to the American public. Silent Spring was met with fierce opposition by chemical companies, but it spurred a reversal in national pesticide policy, led to a nationwide ban on DDT for agricultural uses,[2] and inspired an environmental movement that led to the creation of the U.S.

Your Lifestyle Has Already Been Designed Well I’m in the working world again. I’ve found myself a well-paying gig in the engineering industry, and life finally feels like it’s returning to normal after my nine months of traveling. Because I had been living quite a different lifestyle while I was away, this sudden transition to 9-to-5 existence has exposed something about it that I overlooked before. Since the moment I was offered the job, I’ve been markedly more careless with my money. Not stupid, just a little quick to pull out my wallet. As a small example, I’m buying expensive coffees again, even though they aren’t nearly as good as New Zealand’s exceptional flat whites, and I don’t get to savor the experience of drinking them on a sunny café patio.

Nature’s matrix: Linking agriculture, conservation and food sovereignty An important book argues that conservationists who focus on creating nature preserves are undermining their own cause. To truly protect biodiversity, environmentalists must support the global struggle of peasant farmers for human rights, land, and sustainable agriculture. NATURE’S MATRIX Linking Agriculture, Conservation and Food Sovereignty by Ivette Perfecto,John Vandermeer,and Angus Wright Forget GDP: The Social Progress Index Measures National Well-Being For many years, the powers that be thought that economic indicators were the ultimate measure of a country’s well-being. That’s starting to change. As we have discussed before, the general happiness of a country doesn’t always correlate with its wealth.

The One-Straw Revolution Masanobu Fukuoka (1913-2008) was a farmer and philosopher who was born and raised on the Japanese island of Shikoku. He studied plant pathology and spent several years working as a customs inspector in Yokohama. While working there, at the age of 25, he had an inspiration that changed his life. He decided to quit his job, return to his home village and put his ideas into practice by applying them to agriculture.

Flourishing as a Goal of International Policy The discipline of positive psychology studies what free people choose when they are not oppressed. I call these desiderata the elements of “well-being,” and when an individual or nation has them in abundance I say it is “flourishing.” Governments continue to organize their politics and economics around the relief of suffering, and I cannot confidently predict that the planet’s future will be bright with nonoppressed peoples freely choosing the elements of well-being. But if there is to be a “positive human future,” and not just a “nonnegative human future,” it is necessary to discover what the elements of well-being are and how to build them.

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