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Frighteningly Ambitious Startup Ideas

Frighteningly Ambitious Startup Ideas
March 2012 One of the more surprising things I've noticed while working on Y Combinator is how frightening the most ambitious startup ideas are. In this essay I'm going to demonstrate this phenomenon by describing some. Any one of them could make you a billionaire. That might sound like an attractive prospect, and yet when I describe these ideas you may notice you find yourself shrinking away from them. Don't worry, it's not a sign of weakness. There's a scene in Being John Malkovich where the nerdy hero encounters a very attractive, sophisticated woman. Here's the thing: If you ever got me, you wouldn't have a clue what to do with me. That's what these ideas say to us. This phenomenon is one of the most important things you can understand about startups. [1] You'd expect big startup ideas to be attractive, but actually they tend to repel you. 1. The best ideas are just on the right side of impossible. Microsoft : Google :: Google : Facebook. 2. Whatever you build, make it fast. 3. 4. 5.

http://paulgraham.com/ambitious.html

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App.net 3rd-party revshare proposal by Dalton Caldwell I have been thinking a lot about what makes great 3rd-party developer ecosystems work. At the end of the day, it really boils down to financial incentives, and the ability of an ecosystem to support 3rd-party devs making a living and maintaining a good lifestyle. If the rules are setup correctly, great 3rd-party development platforms create a strong financial incentive for 3rd-party developers to make great software. Why? Healthy platforms allow 3rd-party developers to make lots of money. If you can setup the financial incentives in the right way, people are able to make a great living by building great software that is useful and makes people happy.

Viral Video Chart - Most Popular Brand Viral Videos - Digital Advertisement Advertising Age Honors the Best Brand Storytelling at the 2014 Viral Video Awards By Grace Chung on 04.01.2014 German Hair Care Brand Shows How to Do YouTube Right for Valentine's Day Abundance Authors Diamandis and Kotler Answer Your Questions We recently solicited your questions for Peter Diamandis, founder and CEO of the X Prize Foundation, and journalist Steven Kotler. They are co-authors of the new book Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think. Below are their answers about the need for jobs (it’s not what you may suspect), the distribution of wealth, and the technological breakthrough that led the price of aluminum to plummet. Thanks to everyone for participating. by Eran B.Y You will fall in love with someone who annoys you, whose orgasm face looks and feels pathetic. Despite all of this, there’s something keeping you drawn to them, something that makes you want to protect them from the harsh world. What you fail to realize, however, is that you are the harsh world. You aren’t their noble protector — you are someone to be protected from but it takes a lot of dates, a lot of nights where you question whether or not you are actually a good person, for this to ever resonate with you.

Four African Girls Created Urine-Powered Generator 7 November '12, 04:58pm Follow What have you built lately? 14-year-olds Duro-Aina Adebola, Akindele Abiola, Faleke Oluwatoyin, and 15-year-old Bello Eniola have created a urine powered generator. All over Africa, young men and women have missioned across the country and arrived in Lagos, Nigeria. All they want to do is show off what they have made. What Twitter could have been by Dalton Caldwell I remember when you could go to Twitter.com and see the global firehose on the front page. They had no traffic. The global feed was mostly employees and their friends talking to each other. When Twitter started to get traction, a year or two into their existence, I decided that Twitter was the Best Thing Ever. I realized that Twitter, because of their API, actually was a real-time protocol to connect various services in a novel way.

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Why Startup Founders are Always Unhappy — jessblog Startups are incredibly stressful. I know many founders whose companies are doing great, but they are still stressed and unhappy. Polyvore is doing great (growing fast and cash-flow positive!) Announcing an audacious proposal by Dalton Caldwell The overwhelmingly positive response to my blogpost, What Twitter could have been has been inspiring. The post has generated 80K pageviews thus far. Without really meaning to, I touched a nerve. The responses to my post largely fell into two camps. Those persistent myths about the Sept. 11 attacks - The Fact Checker (Michael Lutzky/THE WASHINGTON POST) Somehow, there are still people who don’t believe that on Sept. 11, 2001, a group of terrorists seized four commercial jetliners and piloted them toward New York and Washington, killing thousands of people. Never mind the reams of sober and professional reports that have explored what actually happened and why. Instead, a cottage industry of myths has sprung up about that terrible day, such as:

Are Habits the Enemy of Mastery? In his book, Outliers , Malcolm Gladwell helped popularize the notion of 10,000 hours of practice. The idea being that it takes around a decade of consistent practice to become world-class at anything. The idea of 10,000 hours evokes the sense that mastery is mostly a process of endlessly slogging away at a craft. What’s interesting about this is that the research from which the idea is based doesn’t actually support this.

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Freemium has run its course “We are now seeing the end of the freemium model — signing up users for free and trying to upsell,” said Christian Vanek, CEO of the Boulder-based SurveyGizmo, in a recent phone conversation.“6.5 million unique users is not all that it’s cracked up to be. I don’t want hits. I want revenue. I want a real business,” said Matt Wensing, founder and CEO of Stormpulse, in an interview with Mixergy.“Make a product people want to pay for,” said Marco Arment, founder of Instapaper, in a Planet Money interview.

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