background preloader

Fine Gardening: Expert garden plant advice, tips, and ideas from Fine Gardening magazine, including design, care, and how-to garden techniques.

Fine Gardening: Expert garden plant advice, tips, and ideas from Fine Gardening magazine, including design, care, and how-to garden techniques.
Related:  The Garden

Lavender projects | Dried Lavender Tempted to do something with the lavender growing in your yard? Letting such a fragrant herb go to waste would be…well, a waste! Gathering, drying and using lavender is really simple. Dried flowers, lavender sugar and potpourri satchels are all quick and easy to make. Photo Credit: Amy Dee Stephens Cut flower stems about 6 inches long. Just one lavender plant produces enough flowers for a nice harvest. After flowers are dry, strip them by hand into a bowl. Attach your drying lavender to a hanger with ribbon, string or clips. Harvesting First, decide how you want to use your lavender. The individual flower stalks shoot up 6 or more inches above the leafy part of the plant. Drying Drying lavender can be done in a number of ways, and each offers pros and cons. Hang Drying Pros: Requires few materials and can be decorative. Bundle approximately 20 lavender stalks together and secure with a rubber band. Oven Drying Pros: Prevents mold growth, no hang space needed and faster processing time. Processing

Beginning Farmer: ATTRA - National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service Home >Local and Regional Food Systems > Beginning Farmer Sustainable agriculture and the local food movement offer some of the best opportunities for beginning farmers—defined by USDA as those who have been operating a farm or ranch for less than 10 years. Beginning farmers fit no easy stereotype. Compared to established producers, they are more likely to be female and non-white. If you fall somewhere along this continuum, you've come to the right place. NOTE: Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. ATTRA Resources to Help New Farmers Non-ATTRA Resources ATTRA Resources for Beginning Farmers Self-Instruction Courses Beyond Text Instructional Materials Are you a beginning farmer? Agricultural Risk Management - English and Spanish Curriculum There are three sections (trainer's manual, participants manual, and reference materials) to this detailed, user-friendly curriculum that guides the trainer and participants in six risk management lessons. ATTRA Publications

Lawn Seeding: How to Plant Grass Seed - Greenview 5 steps for planting grass seed Planting (or seeding) a lawn is not difficult and can be done successfully by anyone. If you are planting grass seed, follow these five simple steps for best results. Step 1 – Buy the best grass seed A great lawn can only be grown from great grass seeds. The price of grass seed is small compared to the time that will be invested in building a great lawn. Get Greenview Fairway Formula top rated NTEP grass seed today »2 Step 2 – Prepare the soil Step 3 – Plant grass seed Spread the seed evenly by hand in small areas.Use a hand or lawn spreader or a mechanical seeder in large areas.Apply approximately 16 seeds per square inch. Step 4 – Cover Seeds Lightly drag the grass seed bed so no more than ¼-inch of soil covers the grass seed.Cover the grass seed bed with Greenview Grass Seed Accelerator4 to hold seeds in place and retain moisture. Step 5 – Water often When to plant grass seed Grass seed can be planted in the spring and fall with good results. Helpful links

Gardening as an Anarchist Plot Do-it-Yourself Absinthe. A companion bed of herbs and vegetables: I planted a thick bed of herbs and vegetables. After selecting the main ones I wanted, I added a few plants purely for their value as companion plants: e.g., horehound for the tomatoes and yarrow for the herbs. Then I sorted everything out according to likes and dislikes, e.g., tomatoes like both dill and carrots, but dill and carrots dislike each other, so the carrots went on one edge and side of the bed; the dill went on the other. Then I arranged things according to soil strata, e.g., root crops mixed with bushy herbs; tallest plants at the back. and kohlrabi thrown in for comic relief. Companion planting also brings out the best in some plants, e.g., sage and peppermint, which I grow for medicinal use, also drive away cabbage butterflies and carrot flies.

Don't Bag Those Clippings! An Easy Answer It's a question we all face when mowing: Should I bag my clippings or leave them on the lawn? In most cases, the answer is easy: Leave the clippings on the lawn! Leaving the clippings will save you time and energy, and it will return valuable nutrients to the lawn. Like Free Fertilizer The most important thing you can do for your lawn is to feed it regularly, and grass clippings contain the same beneficial nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium nutrients as fertilizer. Less Work for You In addition to recycling nutrients back into the soil, leaving the clippings will cut down your mowing time and relieve you of the chores of emptying the grasscatcher and hauling bags of clippings out to the curb. Some Simple Guidelines There are a few things you can do to help keep your grass strong and looking good when you leave the clippings. Not a Thatch Problem The Exception: when Bagging is Okay There are some circumstances when collecting your grass clippings is warranted.

How to Can, Freeze, Dry and Preserve Any Fruit or Vegetable at Home Home canning, freezing and preserving, whether it is jam, salsa, applesauce, apple butter, pickles or whatever, is easy; with these simple, fully illustrated directions with detailed tips and tricks. Save money, eat healthier, with no additives or chemicals... and with much better taste! This page provides the links to our illustrated recipes and canning* directions - so easy ANYONE can do it, along with a multitude of other recipes, guides and canning instructions. For safety, these recipes closely follow the USDA recipes, Ball Blue Book and/or those provided by major university extension services. Whenever possible, instructions also are provided to allow you to choose the options that are important to you; such as types of cooking equipment or choices in sweeteners: honey, Stevia (in a prepared form like Truvia, it measures same as sugar; if you use another form, you'll need do your own conversion) - or Splenda, if you prefer, , Stevia, fruit juice or sugar. United States Contents:

Tous les champignons sauvages, le portail du champignon : Champyves.fr Tulostoma brumale Tulostome des brumes Tulostome d'hiver Une tête globuleuse ou légèrement applatie d'environ 1 cm de diamètre, un stype cylindrique de 4 cm de haut pour quelques 0,3 de diamètre ... un champignon bien discret, souvent qualifié de rare, qui plus est ne pointe son nez, heu ! Voir la suite ... Volucella pellucens Volucelle transparente Une grosse mouche, un syrphe pour être plus précis, presque totalement noir sauf un segment de l'abdomen blanc transparent (origine du binôme) et, comme tous les représentants de cette famille des Syrphidaes, une impressionnante facilité en vol, notamment en vol stationnaire... Voir la suite ... Phlebia radiata Phlebia merismoides Phlébie rayonnante Voir la suite ... Phlebia tremellosa Mérule tremblante Avant, on disait : Merulius tremellosus, mais c'était avant ! Voir la suite ... Lenzites betulina Lenzite du bouleau Tramète du bouleau Encore un polypore, mais tout de même un peu particulier. Voir la suite ... Polypore souple Polypore de Forquignon

Bringing the Chef's Garden Farm to You | Beyond Organic | Chef's Garden Video Network 10 Killer DIY Garden Hacks Gardening is one of the most rewarding home hobbies you can do. It's fun, sustainable and you get healthy, tasty results. A lot of people like the idea of gardening but find excuses like it's too time consuming, it's too expensive, they don't have enough space, blah blah blah. 1. Vertical Gutter Garden When Suzanne Forsling moved to Juneau Alaska from Iowa, she found that it was a little bit harder to get her garden to grow. 2. Reclaimed Tire Garden If you have some old tires laying around that you don't know what to do with, you could burn them... if you hate the environment, or you could put them to work as cool looking raised garden beds. 3. DIY Earth Box An Earth Box is more than just a box with soil. Check out this post on Crafster.org that will show you how it's done (via Crafting a Greener World). 4. Self-Watering Garden Instructable user AskJerry discovered that his central air conditioning system disposed of approximately 350 gallons of water down the drain each year. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Related: