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10 Useful Findings About How People View Websites

10 Useful Findings About How People View Websites
Eyetracking and research have studied how people look at websites. Here are 10 useful findings you can use. 1. Top left corner gets the attention first When users land on your site, their eye path starts from the upper left corner, and moves on from there. According to this eyetracking study these areas get the most attention: Similar findings came from a study by Yahoo. Are you familiar with the Gutenberg diagram? Image credit The fourth, bottom right terminal area is where you should place your call to action. Designers can download a useful Gutenberg Diagram PSD overlay here. 2. Most people don’t read, but scan. Eyetracking visualizations show that users often read website content in an F-shaped pattern: two horizontal stripes followed by a vertical stripe. Image credit This is why you want your value proposition in the top and why your menu should be either top horizontal or on the left, vertical. How to design for F-patterns? A similar study called this the golden triangle. 3. 4. 5. 6.

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What You Think You Know About the Web Is Wrong If you’re an average reader, I’ve got your attention for 15 seconds, so here goes: We are getting a lot wrong about the web these days. We confuse what people have clicked on for what they’ve read. We mistake sharing for reading. Interaction Design Pattern Library - Welie.com Suggest a pattern Have you seen new examples of patterns out there that have not been described on this site? Send me a link to an example and I'll add it to my to-do list. Suggest a pattern Latest comments more than meets the eye Imagine that you need a refresher on how to tie a tie. So, you decide to type [how to tie a tie] into the Google search box. Which of these results would you choose? Where did your eyes go first when you saw the results page? Did they go directly to the title of the first result? Did you first check the terms in boldface to see if the results really talk about tying a tie?

The 5 Foundation Stages in Web Design at DzineBlog Learn how to earn $125 or more per hour as a freelancer - Click Here Looking for hosting?. We recommend MediaTemple for web hosting. 15 Must-Know Facts on How People View Websites Do you know what is the first thing that your eye is drawn to on a website? And in what pattern do people scan your website? There have been many eyetracking tests on this subject and I’ll give you 15 most useful facts you should know. The picture below shows 3 different websites and where people look on them. 6 Phases of the Web Site Design and Development Process When putting together the main business portion of this site, I wrote an article that outlines the Six Phases of the Web Site Design & Development Process. As an integral part of my own company web site, the article is slanted to how I personally help clients through the process of creating their own site. Here on the blog, however, I wanted to create a more generalized post. Same basic idea, however this version can be utilized by anyone, regardless of who they hire to design their web site. I hope this helps when considering building your own site!

Eye tracking study reveals 12 website tactics Eye tracking studies have revealed valuable information about how people read and interact with websites. One study, Eyetrack III, published a summary of their eye tracking results for news sites. While this is just one eye tracking study focused on a particular type of site, I think there are instructive nuggets here for any informational website. In no particular order, here are 12 results I found particularly interesting. 1.Headlines draw eyes before pictures.

Eye tracking scientists track eye movements in glaucoma patients to check vision impairment while driving This is the article for the study of eye movement. For the tendency to visually track potential prey, see eye-stalking Yarbus eye tracker from the 1960s History[edit] In the 1800s, studies of eye movement were made using direct observations.

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