background preloader

Astronomy For Kids

Astronomy For Kids
Related:  Moon

EARTH'S Seasons - Zoom Astronomy Advertisement. EnchantedLearning.com is a user-supported site. As a bonus, site members have access to a banner-ad-free version of the site, with print-friendly pages.Click here to learn more. (Already a member? Click here.) EnchantedLearning.comThe Seasons and Axis Tilt The Earth's seasons are not caused by the differences in the distance from the Sun throughout the year (these differences are extremely small). The Earth's axis is tilted from perpendicular to the plane of the ecliptic by 23.45°. Summer is warmer than winter (in each hemisphere) because the Sun's rays hit the Earth at a more direct angle during summer than during winter and also because the days are much longer than the nights during the summer. Solstices The solstices are days when the Sun reaches its farthest northern and southern declinations. EquinoxesEquinoxes are days in which day and night are of equal duration. Related Pages:

The Space Shuttle Since 1981, NASA space shuttles have been rocketing from the Florida coast into Earth orbit. The five orbiters — Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour — have flown more than 130 times, carrying over 350 people into space and travelling more than half a billion miles, more than enough to reach Jupiter. Designed to return to Earth and land like a giant glider, the shuttle was the world's first reusable space vehicle. More than all of that, though, the shuttle program expanded the limits of human achievement and broadened our understanding of our world. It all started with STS-1, launched on April 12, 1981, just twenty years to the day after Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human in space. For an entire generation, the space shuttle was NASA. In this feature, we look back at the Shuttle's historic missions, the people it flew into space, and its achievements.

Science Projects for Kids: The Incredible Universe" Science projects for kids: the incredible universe takes you to worlds just waiting to be discovered. With simple instructions and everyday materials, you'll be learning more about constellations with the kids. You can start with star gazing and watching shooting stars -- and then make a planetarium or star theater to bring what you've learned back home. Learn more about the planets and star brightness, and make an astrolabe. Follow the links below to find science projects for kids: the incredible universe that you can do with kids: Make a PlanetariumUse planetarium to show constellations on a wall in your house. Star GazingStart by finding the North Star, and then see more. Umbrella Full of StarsTurn your umbrella into a star-studded private planetarium. Star TheaterMake constellation punch-outs and then a star theater. Scale Down the Solar SystemUse peas, fruit, and nuts in a true scale model of the solar system. Spot the PlanetsLearn to find Venus, Jupiter and other wandering stars.

NASA Kids Club Skip to main content NASA Kids Club › Text Only Site Solar System Switch-a-Roo Play Now! Orion Fun Stuff Download. Orion Puzzles and Coloring Sheets Print and Play. Space Racers Watch. For Parents and Teachers Teach your kids and students safe surfing habits.› Children's Protection Act Learn about what you can do to protect your privacy online.› Page Last Updated: February 12th, 2015 Page Editor: Flint Wild Skip to main content NASA Kids Club › Text Only Site Solar System Switch-a-Roo Play Now! Orion Fun Stuff Download. Orion Puzzles and Coloring Sheets Print and Play. Space Racers Watch. For Parents and Teachers Teach your kids and students safe surfing habits.› Children's Protection Act Learn about what you can do to protect your privacy online.›

CLIL Teachers´ Web Guide | An Internet guide of interactive resources for CLIL teachers published by Carmen Mellado Álvarez The Moon - Facts About The Moon For Kids the Moon was probably made 4.5 billion years ago when a large object hit the Earth and blasted out rocks that came together to orbit round the Earth. They eventually melted together, cooled down and became the Moon. For another 500 million years pieces of rock kept striking aginst the surface of the Moon. You can see the surface of the Moon by using a pair of binoculars or a small telescope. The Moon’s surface shows the damage caused by these large pieces of rock hitting it billions of years ago. Figure 1. All parts of the Moon are lit in turn by the Sun. Figure 2. This diagram shows the phases of the moon, from a new moon, which you can hardly see at all, round to a full moon and back again in just over four weeks. Figure 3. The gravity of the Moon, the pull which it exerts on the Earth, causes two high tides on the Earth every day – one every 12 hours and 25 minutes. Figure 4. The Moon is 239,000 miles, or 384,000 kilometres away from the Earth. Useful Websites

New 2013 Phases of the Moon Animation Released A new animation highlighting the phases of the Moon has been released by the Scientific Visualization Studio at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The animation shows at hourly intervals, the geocentric phase, libration, position angle of the Moon's axis, and apparent diameter of the Moon throughout the year 2013. Topographic measurements by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter make it possible to simulate shadows on the Moon's surface with unprecedented accuracy and detail. "Thanks to Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, we now have excellent terrain maps of the Moon that can tell us the elevation at any point on the surface," said Ernie Wright, author of the new video from the Scientific Visualization Studio (SVS). "I use those maps to make the Moon sphere bumpy in all the right places. That allows the rendering software to realistically simulate all the shadows and the ragged terminator (the dividing line between day and night)."

Your Weight on Other Worlds Ever wonder what you might weigh on Mars or The Moon? Here's your chance to find out. <div class="js-required"><hr> This Page requires a Javascript capable browser <hr></div> Fill in your weight below in the space indicated. You can enter your weight in any unit you wish. Click on the "Calculate" button. Mass and Weight Before we get into the subject of gravity and how it acts, it's important to understand the difference between weight and mass. We often use the terms "mass" and "weight" interchangeably in our daily speech, but to an astronomer or a physicist they are completely different things. Weight is an entirely different thing. If you are in a spaceship far between the stars and you put a scale underneath you, the scale would read zero. The Relationship Between Gravity and Mass and Distance As stated above, your weight is a measure of the pull of gravity between you and the body you are standing on. The two "M's" on top are your mass and the planet's mass. Isaac Newton

Related: