background preloader

Gardening Without a Garden: 10 Ideas for Your Patio or Balcony Renters Solutions

Gardening Without a Garden: 10 Ideas for Your Patio or Balcony Renters Solutions

DIY Satsuma Candle A friend of mine DIYed her own candles, made from the peels of Satsuma oranges, for a recent dinner party. I was so excited by this simple yet clever idea, I had to share the tutorial on HonestlyWTF. My only regret is not discovering this sooner when Satsumas were at their absolute peak in December. Hopefully, you’ll still be able to snatch up a few at your local grocery store or farmer’s market and impress your guests at your next dinner party! The stem side of the Satsuma will be the bottom and base of the candle. Because Satsumas are known for their loosely attached peels, the orange should easily be removed. Once the flesh of the orange is taken out, the pith connecting the outer stem should remain. Pour a few glugs of olive oil into the orange, leaving just the very tip of the pith exposed. Depending on the length of the pith, the candle should burn for at least a couple of hours. (all images via HonestlyWTF)

7 Ways To Garden When You Don't Have A Yard. (Before It's News) I’ve highlighted 7 ways to help you grow your own garden when you don’t have a yard. Do you have any diy tutorials, organizing tips, or recipes that you would like to share with DIY Home Sweet Home readers? If so, please fill out the ‘Get Featured‘ form for a chance to be featured on this blog! Please visit DIY Home Sweet Home for more DIY projects Source:

DIY: Repurposed Tins as Magnetic Organizers + Free Printable Hello lovelies! I am proud to say that today’s post was dreamed up by my sweet 11 year old daughter, Miss K. The other day I walked into my kitchen to discover that she’d brilliantly repurposed an old Chimes candy tin as a magnetic pencil holder on our fridge! I definitely had one of those, “why didn’t I think of that” moments and asked her if I could share her smarty-pants idea with you all here today. This project is so ridiculously simple it literally takes seconds to do. Here are the easy directions: Collect up your supplies: You will need: Small tins (tea tins, mint tins, and candy tins are perfect). How to: Place a minimum of two super strong magnets on your fridge or any metal surface you would like to use. I also put together these cute little Bird Brain Shopping Lists + Notes Lists for you to download and print. Download Bird Brain Shopping Lists (prints 4 lists per page)Download Bird Brain Notes Lists (prints 4 per page) Enjoy!

Porch Railing Gardening Window Box A window box adapted to a railing is ideal for creating a small-space garden on a porch or deck A daily walk through the garden to harvest a few vine-ripened tomatoes, some peppers or a handful of aromatic basil is a dream come true for anyone who enjoys cooking with fresh ingredients. Unfortunately, not everyone has the time or the space to cultivate a large vegetable garden. Gardening in small spaces is a trend that has taken hold with apartment dwellers, condo owners, and those who either don't have enough space for a large garden or the need for one. There are several options for small space gardens, and some don't even require ground to plant in. For those living in apartments or where balcony space is all that is available, a window box adapted to a railing will work just as well. If you own a deck, patio or terrace that offers a bit more space, vegetable boxes might be the perfect solution for a manageable garden. Available at Amazon.com: Copyright © 2011 SEAN CONWAY.

Cheap Craft Ideas - Inexpensive Crafts Adapted from Clare Youngs’s The Perfect Handmade Bag ($19.95; Cico), this cute carryall requires little more than a pair of small wooden spatulas and two tea towels ($15 each; motherlindas.com). Cut six strips of fabric from one towel. Two, measuring 33⁄4"W x 141⁄4"L each, will serve as the decorative horizontal bands at the top of the tote and should incorporate the towel’s graphics (as shown, left). The other four, measuring 31⁄2"W x 8"L, will form tabs for the bag’s handles. Turn under the long sides of each strip and press a 1⁄4" hem. To make a tab, topstitch one of the long sides of a 31⁄2"W x 8"L strip near the edge. Lay the second towel on a flat surface, right side up. Flip the towel right side down. Fold the towel in half, wrong sides together.

Tuvie Skyfarm Being friendly to environment, reducing pollution, saving space and energy, grow your own food – those have been the wide-spread conscious trends lately. How could one combine all of those in one, especially dwelling in a metropolis? Skyfarm concept gives a comprehensive reply to the question. Even on a very limited balcony space you can enjoy growing your food in the Skyfarm. Cheap Craft Ideas - Inexpensive Crafts Adapted from Clare Youngs’s The Perfect Handmade Bag ($19.95; Cico), this cute carryall requires little more than a pair of small wooden spatulas and two tea towels ($15 each; motherlindas.com). Cut six strips of fabric from one towel. Two, measuring 33⁄4"W x 141⁄4"L each, will serve as the decorative horizontal bands at the top of the tote and should incorporate the towel’s graphics (as shown, left). The other four, measuring 31⁄2"W x 8"L, will form tabs for the bag’s handles. Turn under the long sides of each strip and press a 1⁄4" hem. To make a tab, topstitch one of the long sides of a 31⁄2"W x 8"L strip near the edge. Lay the second towel on a flat surface, right side up. Flip the towel right side down. Fold the towel in half, wrong sides together.

Tuvie Balcony Skyfarm Concept We always love the idea of growing our own food, just like Skyfarm concept here. We are consuming too much energy and materials than the nature can provide, this kind of lifestyle is going to be a global issue in the future. Growing our own food can potentially reduce any negative environmental impacts aside from saving money on groceries. However, due to high population, there are more people living in limited space in urban areas, how can we grow our own food with such minimalist space? Designer : Manuel Dreesmann Skyfarm concept consists of a moulded acrylic sphere where your can grow your own organic fruits and vegetables.

Homemade Limoncello If you have never had limoncello, you don't know what you are missing! Limoncello is an Italian lemon liquor that is traditionally sipped after dinner. Served chilled, it is the perfect way to finish a delicious meal. It can be hard to find in stores, so we were so delighted to find out how easy it is to make it at home! Limoncello is made by steeping lemon zest in grain alcohol - Everclear. The Recipe:1 750 ml bottle of Everclear8-10 medium size lemons2 1/2 cups of water1 3/4 cups of sugarYou will also need a glass container to age the lemons and Everclear. When choosing lemons you want to use organic if possible. Now it is time to zest the lemons. Put the zest in your glass jar, pour the Everclear over the top, and close the lid.Now for the really hard part. Our pantry is full of all sorts of things waiting and brewing. Finally it's time to make the limoncello! While it is cooling, you can strain the the zest into another pitcher. Pour the limoncello into two clean bottles.

Copper Tile. $1.44 sq/ft West Elm Knock-Off...er...Inspiration I got a hand-delivered invitation a few weeks ago for a Favorite Things Party. This is the first time I had heard of such a party, and it ended up being a lot of fun. Here's how it works: each person brings their favorite thing (anything you like... your favorite food, lip gloss, favorite kitchen tool, etc.). It can't cost more than $6, and each person brings four of the same thing. When you arrive at the party, you write your name on a slip of paper and throw them in a big bowl. The bowl is passed around, and each person takes four names (making sure you don't pick your own). Even though I was given the invitation a couple weeks prior to the party, the procrastinator in me waited a bit too long to get on it. When I told my husband about my idea he questioned whether I had enough time to make it (I decided to start making them just a couple days before the party). Well as it turned out, my husband was right, and I ran out of time. This pillow was tricky to figure out. Materials:

Related: