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Eric Valli

Eric Valli

Robert Farber Robert Frank Robert Frank's fine flatulent black joke on American politics can be read as either farce or anguished protest. It is possible that Frank himself was not sure which he meant. In 1956, he was still a relative newcomer to the United States, and his basic reaction might well have been one of dumb amazement as he investigated the gaudy insanities and strangely touching contradictions of American culture. A similar shock has been experienced by many others who have been suddenly transplanted as adults to this exotic soil. A few artists and intellectuals have even managed to turn the experience to their creative advantage, if their direction had not yet been too firmly set, as though a new country might be a substitute for being born again. It is tempting to believe that Frank's emergence in the fifties as a photographer of profound originality was a measure of his success in meeting on artistic grounds the very difficult challenge of a radically new culture. from "Looking at Photographs

Annie Liebovitz Born in 1949 in Waterbury, Connecticut, Annie Leibovitz enrolled in the San Francisco Art Institute intent on studying painting. It was not until she traveled to Japan with her mother the summer after her sophomore year that she discovered her interest in taking photographs. When she returned to San Francisco that fall, she began taking night classes in photography. Time spent on a kibbutz in Israel allowed her to hone her skills further. In 1970 Leibovitz approached Jann Wenner, founding editor of Rolling Stone, which he’d recently launched and was operating out of San Francisco. When the magazine began printing in color in 1974, Leibovitz followed suit. In 1980 Rolling Stone sent Leibovitz to photograph John Lennon and Yoko Ono, who had recently released their album “Double Fantasy.” Annie Leibovitz: Photographs, the photographer’s first book, was published in 1983.

Annie Liebovitz January 3rd, 2007 Annie Leibovitz Photo Gallery Get access to content from your local PBS station.Get sneak previews from some of your favorite shows including Masterpiece, Nova, etc.See what's on tonight at your local PBS station. Rony Alwin Jay Mark Johnson (This section is not actively updated) “If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, infinite. For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things through the narrow chinks of his cavern. - William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell (Click on images to view series.) Kim Høltermand Man Ray Nicholas Alan Cope Nan Goldin American photographer Nancy "Nan" Goldin (born September 12, 1953) is an American photographer. Her work often explores LGBT bodies, moments of intimacy, the HIV crisis, and the opioid epidemic. Her most notable work is The Ballad of Sexual Dependency (1986), which documents the post-Stonewall gay subculture and Goldin's family and friends. Early life[edit] The Hug, NYC, 1980, Cibachrome print by Goldin. Goldin was born in Washington, D.C. in 1953[1] and grew up in the Boston suburb of Lexington to middle-class Jewish parents. This was in 1965, when teenage suicide was a taboo subject. Career[edit] Following graduation, Goldin moved to New York City.[12] She began documenting the post-punk new-wave music scene, along with the city's vibrant, post-Stonewall gay subculture of the late 1970s and early 1980s. Goldin's work is most often presented in the form of a slideshow, and has been shown at film festivals; her most famous being a 45-minute show in which 800 pictures are displayed.

Todd Hido

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