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The Power of Habit and How to Rewire Our "Habit Loops"

The Power of Habit and How to Rewire Our "Habit Loops"
by Maria Popova What Iraqi kebob vendors have to do with your New Year’s resolutions. As a young man, Benjamin Franklin set out to improve himself by devising a chart-based log for tracking his progress against the virtues he identified as essential to good personhood. Each week, he would pick a virtue to cultivate, then put a black pencil mark in his calendar chart on any day he failed to uphold the virtue. This visual feedback on his progress encouraged him, and allowed him to move to a different virtue the following week, hoping that each week would leave him with a “habitude” for that particular virtue. We try to reverse-engineer willpower and flowchart our way to happiness, but in the end, it is habit that is at the heart of our successes and our failures. Duhigg first became fascinated by the power of habit eight years ago, while in Baghdad as a newspaper reporter. So the major summoned Kufa’s mayor and made a strange request: Get the food vendors out of the plaza. Donating = Loving Related:  Conscious Learning

20 mental barriers you should let go of photo by admitchell08 You are in an imaginary hot air balloon. It’s just you and all of your belongings in the wicker basket. Something went wrong and you are losing altitude fast. The only immediate solution is to get rid of excess weight and throw off at least half of your belongings. This happens to all of us in less dramatic circumstances. Our mental life follows the same fate. Some of them are useless ideas that drag us down considerably. So if you were in the hot air balloon situation, which of these mental barriers should we let go? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Related posts: THE FOUR INTRINSIC REWARDS THAT DRIVE EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT Motivational dynamics have changed dramatically to reflect new work requirements and changed worker expectations. One of the biggest changes has been the rise in importance of psychic, or intrinsic rewards, and the decline of material or extrinsic rewards. This author draws upon recent research to explain the popularity of intrinsic rewards and how these rewards can be used to build a high-engagement culture. I have been researching workplace motivation for about 30 years and I’m amazed at how much has changed recently. Most of the motivational models used today were developed in earlier eras, when work and workers were different. Extrinsic and intrinsic rewards Extrinsic rewards—usually financial—are the tangible rewards given employees by managers, such as pay raises, bonuses, and benefits. Extrinsic rewards played a dominant role in earlier eras, when work was generally more routine and bureaucratic, and when complying with rules and procedures was paramount. Sense of meaningfulness.

MindShift | How we will learn MindShift explores the future of learning in all its dimensions. We examine how learning is being impacted by technology, discoveries about how the brain works, poverty and inequities, social and emotional practices, assessments, digital games, design thinking and music, among many other topics. We look at how learning is evolving in the classroom and beyond.We also revisit old ideas that have come full circle in the era of the over scheduled child, such as unschooling, tinkering, playing in the woods, mindfulness, inquiry-based learning and student motivation. We report on shifts in how educators practice their craft as they apply innovative ideas to help students learn, while meeting the rigorous demands of their standards and curriculum. MindShift has a unique audience of educators, tinkerers, policy makers and life-long learners who engage in meaningful dialogue with one another on our sites. Contact the us by email.

Intrinsic Motivation Doesn't Exist, Researcher Says COLUMBUS , Ohio – While some psychologists still argue that people perform better when they do something because they want to – rather than for some kind of reward, such as money -- Steven Reiss suggests we shouldn't even make that distinction. Reiss, a professor of psychology at Ohio State University , argues that a diverse range of human motivations can't be forced into these categories of intrinsic and extrinsic motivations. Psychologists say intrinsic motivations are those that arise from within – doing something because you want to – while extrinsic motivations mean people are seeking a reward, such as money, a good grade in class, or a trophy at a sporting event. “They are taking many diverse human needs and motivations, putting them into just two categories, and then saying one type of motivation is better than another,” said Reiss, who outlines his argument in the current issue of the journal Behavior Analyst. “But there is no real evidence that intrinsic motivation even exists.”

How to Study Less by Learning Things Once You read over your notes. Then you read them over again. Then you read them over a third time. A lot of study time is wasted because of one problem: you fail to learn things the first time around. Repeatedly going over the same information like putting a band-aid over a sieve. The key to reducing the amount of time you study is simple: learn things the first time you see them, instead of after dozens of repetitions. This is all easier said than done. Step One: Find the Holes If you want to repair a leaky brain, you need to figure out where the holes are. What from this section am I most likely to forget? When you identify weak points, you can invest more time in fixing those instead of wasting time with a blanket studying technique of all information. Step Two: Repair Weak Points Once you’ve identified potential weak-points, you should immediately seek to fix them. Memorizing? Repairing weak points in your understanding isn’t that difficult – if you first know where they are.

'Queerying' gender: Heteronormativity in early childhood education (free full-text available) The AJEC Committee invites readers' thoughts on the matters raised in this article, as well as elsewhere within the journal. Letters to the editor, enquiries, comments, submissions and contributions can be sent to publishing@earlychildhood.org.au. Kerry H. Robinson University of Western Sydney This paper explores heteronormativity and argues for the ‘queerying' of gender in early childhood education. The author argues, utilising Butler's theory of performativity and heterosexual matrix, that the construction of gender in young children's lives requires an analysis of the normalising practices in which gendered identities are simultaneously heterosexualised. Introduction Over the past decade or so, research has increasingly documented the process of gender construction in early childhood. What is heteronormativity? What is meant by heteronormativity? The intimate relationship between gender and sexuality: Butler's performativity and ‘heterosexual matrix'

Top 10 Things That Determine Happiness photo: meddygarnet Happiness is, by nature, a subjective quality with a definition like a moving target. There is scant evidence — qualitative or quantitative — to lend convincing support to those life variables most critical in determining individual happiness, which is likely why past researchers committed to the scientific method rarely tried to tackle the subject. This is changing. Take, for example, the World Database of Happiness in Rotterdam, self-described as a, “continuous register of scientific research on subjective appreciation of life.” While we’re not entirely convinced of this marriage between science and subjectivity, we can still offer up a top 10 of things that determine human happiness, as supported by this growing body of research. No.10 – Having a short memory Are you one to hold grudges? No.9 – Exacting fairness No.8 – Having lots of friendships No.7 – Being spiritual No.6 – Thinking ahead No.5 – Developing a skill According to psychology professor Dr. No.2 – Good genes

New study says friends the key to childrens' happiness The Queensland University of Technology has found that between the ages of nine and 14, a good friend is the key to a child's happiness. Source: Supplied FRIENDS are the key to kids' happiness, trumping families and toys as a source of joy, new research reveals. Girls are more cheerful than boys - but happiness starts to dive from the age of nine, when children become as miserable as the elderly and sick. Unhappiness among tweenagers has become so acute that schools are resorting to classroom psychotherapy to help students look on the bright side. Students are being taught "gratitude, hope and serenity", in American-inspired programs used by some of the nation's top private schools - including Geelong and Sydneys Knox grammar schools - and spreading within the public system. Behavioural economists Tony Beatton and Paul Frijters, from the Queensland University of Technology, have found that extroverted and conscientious children are the happiest.

106 Excuses That Prevent You From Ever Becoming Great The following is a rare guest post, this time coming from Tommy Walker. Tommy Walker is an Online Marketing Strategist and host of “Inside the Mind” a fresh and entertaining video show about Internet Marketing Strategy. Be honest. How often do you sabotage yourself? On any given day, you have tasks you’d like to finish because you know they’d positively impact your business, and tasks you actually do. You trick yourself into thinking that keeping up with industry news, and reading the latest “10 tips to ______” post is “working”. You know better, but some part of you believes that simply reading the article will help you move forward. That having a deep understanding of all things online marketing will better position you when the time is right. But that time doesn’t come. Something is holding you back, and you can’t quite put your finger on it. You may have one excuse; you may have several. What follows are 106 of the most common excuses you might tell yourself. You don’t have the knowledge.

Win-Win / Win-Lose / Lose-Lose Situations The Basics Win-win, win-lose, and lose-lose are game theory terms that refer to the possible outcomes of a game or dispute involving two sides, and more importantly, how each side perceives their outcome relative to their standing before the game. For example, a "win" results when the outcome of a negotiation is better than expected, a "loss" when the outcome is worse than expected. Two people may receive the same outcome in measurable terms, say $10, but for one side that may be a loss, while for the other it is a win. In other words, expectations determine one's perception of any given result. Win-win outcomes occur when each side of a dispute feels they have won. Win-lose situations result when only one side perceives the outcome as positive. Lose-lose means that all parties end up being worse off. In other situations, though, lose-lose outcomes occur when win-win outcomes might have been possible. Use the following to cite this article: Spangler, Brad.

Five Classic Ways to Boost Your Note-Taking - Note-taking - Lifehacker Glad to see the Cornell Method here. I use it and love it. I would not skip on the summary at the bottom. I've actually never seen or read of it done without it, but nothing wrong with adapting. Though I wouldn't adapt it until I've tried it the was it was intended. I suggest that if having unrelated content or content that doesn't group well on the same page is a problem, you'd be better served to recognize that you need to start a new page than to skip the summary. There are templates out there for the Cornell Method but a strait-edge and a pencil will do the job nicely. And as far as going visual. I found the only thing that anyone really cared about, as far as what other students were doing, is the guy who though he knew more than the prof and questioned everything that was said.

Conflict Resolution Skills: Turning Conflicts into Opportunities Understanding conflict in relationships Conflict arises from differences, both large and small. It occurs whenever people disagree over their values, motivations, perceptions, ideas, or desires. Conflicts arise from differing needs Everyone needs to feel understood, nurtured, and supported, but the ways in which these needs are met vary widely. Think about the conflicting need for safety and continuity versus the need to explore and take risks. The needs of both parties play important roles in the long-term success of most relationships, and each deserves respect and consideration. Conflict 101 A conflict is more than just a disagreement. Conflict may feel more threatening to you than it really is Do you fear conflict or avoid it at all costs? If you view conflict as dangerous, it tends to become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Successful conflict resolution depends on your ability to regulate stress and your emotions The ability to successfully resolve conflict depends on your ability to: Close

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