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Your Privacy Kind of Sucks, Fix it Up This Weekend

Your Privacy Kind of Sucks, Fix it Up This Weekend
Since it's hard to trust what companies that get your data will do with it, the best way to maintain your privacy online is to minimize what you give them. Create accounts with pseudonyms or variants of your name (yes, even Facebook and Google+). Supply only profile information that is absolutely necessary, and lie about critical stuff like birthdates. Turn off all app- and ad-related functionality on Facebook and other sites wherever possible. Diversify your digital life by using services from different companies, and provide each with different profile information and email addresses. And remember that "opt out" usually does not mean your information won't be collected and stored, it generally only means that you won't be served up constant reminders of it (e.g., targeted ads, browsable web history, etc). Related:  Security - Privacy - Back Ups - Hacking - Downloading

DIY USB password generator » Code and Life Having done half a dozen V-USB tutorials I decided it’s time to whip up something cool. As USB keyboards were an area untouched, I decided to make a small USB HID keyboard device that types a password stored in EEPROM every time it’s attached. A new password can be generated just by tabbing CAPS LOCK a few times (4 times to start password regeneration and one tab for each password character generated, 10 is the default password length). Below you can see the device in action: The place I work at requires me to change my password every few months so this would be one way to skip remembering a new password altogether (as long as I remember to write it down before regenerating a new one so password can be changed :). What is inside? The device is powered with a simplified version of the hardware I used in my ATtiny85 USB tutorial – I stripped away the LCD, reset pullup and both capacitors. The enclosure was graciously donated by an old 512 MB flash drive. Software Update 2: Indiegogo project

How to Remove Your Google Search History Before Google's New Privacy Policy Takes Effect [UPDATE 2/22/2012] It is important to note that disabling Web History in your Google account will not prevent Google from gathering and storing this information and using it for internal purposes. More information at the end of this post. On March 1st, Google will implement its new, unified privacy policy, which will affect data Google has collected on you prior to March 1st as well as data it collects on you in the future. Until now, your Google Web History (your Google searches and sites visited) was cordoned off from Google's other products. This protection was especially important because search data can reveal particularly sensitive information about you, including facts about your location, interests, age, sexual orientation, religion, health concerns, and more. Here's how you can do that: 1. 2. 3. 4. Note that removing your Web History also pauses it. If you have several Google accounts, you will need to do this for each of them.

10 Travel Tips for Protecting Your Privacy Fran Maier is the president and executive chair of TRUSTe, the leading online privacy solutions provider. She speaks widely on issues of online privacy and trust and is active in mentoring women in technology. She serves on a number of Internet and trust-related boards, including the Online Trust Alliance. At the peak of summer, the weather is not all that’s heating up – privacy, it turns out, has never been hotter. What does this have to do with your upcoming vacation? 1. If you’re connecting to a wireless network, be it at a café or your hotel lobby, it should be password-protected to prevent unauthorized persons from accessing the network. 2. Computers, tablets and smartphones are popular theft targets due to their high resale value, but you can equip them with 21st century anti-theft protection. 3. Announcing your travel plans on a social media account can clue potential thieves to an opportunity to raid your vacant home. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Foil Electronic Pickpockets with Aluminum Foil or Multiple Credit Cards so someone not even close by can hack my phone and grab my info? what's wrong with cards that don't have chips and are swiped? it's not like they're any less convenient it will be your fault for keeping your bluetooth on all the time I do not see how he would even connect to your phone if your phone isn't acting as a teethering device, and even then you'd need to physically connect it and even if someone did, there are algorithms that are almost uncrackable that can be implemented ALMOST uncrackable. everything that is said to be fool-proof is eventually hacked, it's always been like this. and why would i need to have my bluetooth on? NFC connects by a shortwave (much shorter than bt) and literally anything that comes within range can give a payment.

Automatic Anonymous Wifi The two applications we will be using are called MadMACs and TOR. When a computer connects to a wireless network it usually obtains an IP through a DHCP server, which is basically just a method of providing dynamic IPs so that everyone does not have to sit down and figure out what IP everyone else is using and then manually set one on their own machine. When a request is made to a DHCP server two pieces of information are recorded, your MAC address and your hostname. What MadMACs does is randomize both of these for you automatically every time you boot, or every time you manually tell the software to do so. Once your computer is connected to the network, randomized or not, most of the traffic leaving your PC is in the clear. So with both pieces of software installed you have hidden your identity from the network, and made all of your traffic unreadable by anyone else on the network you have chosen to connect to. (Sorry, no how madmacs works, but then its pretty self explanatory)

Password Safe Top 10 Secret Agent Security Tips and Tricks When dealing with computer security, an often overlooked security risk is so-called "deleted files". When files are deleted, nothing is actually done to them aside from marking them as "free-space". The OS may get around to overwriting them sometime when it needs the space, but a deleted file could sit on a drive completely intact for weeks of usage (the bigger it is the bigger the chance it will be at least partially overwrited). Encryption applications that do not involve real-time decoding (a special driver decrypting files on-the-go vs an application decrypting and re-encrypting files), often do not have secure methods of wiping files (or the user is unaware of them), and hence the files are left in an unencrypted state on the drive when deleted. The only way to assure deleted files remain that way (or at least make their recovery very difficult and time-consuming) is to have an application overwrite the drives free-space with random 0s/1s, ideally multiple times.

Five Things You Should Know to Keep the Man from Snooping on Your Digital Stuff "Think of it it like leaving your doors and windows open and complaining when someone looks inside." I find this to be an iffy comparison. I understand what you guys are trying to explain but it misrepresents the problem. I'm entitled to leave my windows and doors of my house open, if someone steps onto my property to have a look without my permission than in most countries that's trespassing. If they were trying to take a peek from the sidewalk then sure, by all means, go ahead. It largely depends on what the guy accessed or not. If he saw it was open and decided to take a look and didn't delve into any emails, send any or whatever then sure, I can live with that, if he merely just looked at the page that was already being displayed. But if he went inside individual emails, started reading them etc, I find that should be comparable to going into someone's mailbox and opening up the letters, which is a federal crime.

The PC Repair Toolkit in your Pocket: Boot CD on a USB Stick It has been around for a long time, but I still know a lot of techs who don’t know about it. Ultimate Boot CD includes memory checkers, CPU stress testers, system information tools, boot managers and tools for hard drives, partitions, password resets, and more. For a full list, check out the UBCD page. Typically, this is burned onto an ISO and you boot using a CD. But isn’t that so “last year”? Putting it onto a USB Drive makes it much more portable and it can sit side by side with your other portable tech tools. The directions on how to do this are courtesy of pendrivelinux: Download the Ultimate Boot CD iso file and place it into its own directoryDownload the UBCDfix.exe file and run it, extracting into the above folder From this folder click fixubcd.bat and follow the instructions Move the contents of the /dir/USBUBCD folder to your USB drive From your USB drive, run makeboot.bat to make it bootable That’s it! After booting from the drive you’ll see the UBCD menu:

Vanish: Enhancing the Privacy of the Web with Self-Destructing Data

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