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Building an Effective School BYOD Plan

Building an Effective School BYOD Plan
61,488 views Schools are needing increasing amounts of expensive educational technology at a time when budgets are shrinking. Many have started to explore BYOD policies - Bring Your Own Device - as a practical ... Schools are needing increasing amounts of expensive educational technology at a time when budgets are shrinking. Many have started to explore BYOD policies - Bring Your Own Device - as a practical solution to integrate cost effective technology into their educational programs. With the convergence of widespread broadband and the growth of powerful, platform independent web based tools BYOD has finally arrived as an effective educational alternative to other plans that require expensive purchasing and maintenance. Statistics Views Total Views Views on SlideShare Embed Views Actions Likes Downloads 86 Embeds 47,358 More... Usage Rights © All Rights Reserved

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BYOT: No Internet Access, No Problem Posted by Shelly Terrell on Wednesday, April 3rd 2013 Part of the Mobile Learning Series! “The principle goal of education in schools should be creating men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done.” ~ Jean Piaget

20 BYOD Resources For The 21st Century Schools by Hope Mulholland, TeachThought Intern BYOD policies–Bring Your Own Device–allow schools to bring technology into the classroom with a “bottom-up” approach. Such an approach can save money, allow students to use their own devices, and encourage a student-centered approach to learning. Recently we explained that “digital natives or not, technology dropped into the laps of students in schools isn’t always as accessible as it might be. By allowing students to bring in their own devices for learning–rather than insisting that they learn both content and device in school–there is an important opportunity to connect with not just their personal lives, but their natural way of doing things.”

Learn BYOD policy best practices from templates When drafting a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy, you might be tempted to cut and paste from a template you find online. However, BYOD policies aren't one size fits all. You should think of BYOD policy templates as the starting point for your creation process. Mobile Learning: 50+ Resources & Tips I believe mobile devices will transform education. This is why I created a free ebook, Effective Mobile Learning: 50+ Quick Tips & Resources with helpful tips and several resources to help support this trend. One reason is because mobile devices are designed in a way that forces the teacher to give control to the learner. When we equip a classroom with iPads, iPods, small tablets, or cellphones the learning is literally put in the hands of the students. The teacher has to facilitate and walk around the room to manage the learning. Below are a list of 50+ Mobile Learning resources & growing!

First 5 Lessons Learned In Our First Year Of BYOT BYOT or Bring Your Own Technology is off to a rousing start in our District and at the high school where I serve as a Campus Technology Integration Specialist. As the year winds to an end, I thought I would share some of the first lessons that were learned. You should know that our high school is large with over 160 teachers and 2500 students. If you are beginning or about to begin your own BYOT/BYOD push, this may provide something to help in your process. Lesson 1 - Get administration on board! These folks are critical.

Educational Leadership:Students Who Challenge Us:On Board with BYOD Should students bring their own personal technologies to school and use them for learning? Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) plans, also known as Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) plans, have been gaining acceptance among an increasing number of schools—including, perhaps, yours. Several factors are contributing to the popularity of encouraging students to bring their own personal technologies to school and use them for learning. These are just a few: BYOT: The hidden messages I have been very fortunate to see Bring Your Own Technology — BYOT — in action in schools in various countries, with learners of various economic backgrounds. While teaching in the U.S., Germany, Greece, Slovenia and Croatia, I used BYOT to teach my learners with technology when little to no technology was available to us. I have integrated BYOT with learners from the ages of 4 to 80 who came from various economic situations.

Web 2.0 Resources for BYOT Programs As my school district prepares to implement BYOT in the 2012-2013 school, I have collected Web 2.0 tools that students and faculty (grades 7-12) could use. Because of the sheer number of apps for mobile devices, I have not included any apps. Recommendations would be greatly appreciated! Leave a comment with your recommendations! Thank you!! Agriculture: s BYOD Dream Tools: Free Tools that Work on ANY device! Other TeachersFirst Special Topics Collections This collection of reviewed tools from TeachersFirst includes apps that are available for FREE on iOS (iPad, iPhone), Android, and web devices. Ideal for BYOD classrooms or 1:1 computer/tablet programs, these reviewed tools allow users to create and access projects using the same app, no matter what kind of device they have. This collection includes only "DATs" (device agnostic tools) that are FREE on all devices and offer free access with sufficient features to be useful without upgrading to a paid account. Whether you call it an "app" or a "web tool," a DAT allows you to access your projects from almost any device.

20 BYOT Resources By Category Whether you call it BYOT or BYOD (technology vs device), it’s clear that as people become more attached to their mobile devices and as mobile devices become more customized and an extension of their owners, more schools and employers are permitting and even encouraging students and employees to bring their own devices to work. Devices may include laptops, tablets, smartphones and more. As a result, many educators are scrambling to get a handle on the issues surrounding the “bring your own device” trend. Resources abound on this topic, and some are offered below. General Overview, Best Practices

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