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Leadership

Leadership
Theories[edit] Early western history[edit] The trait theory was explored at length in a number of works in the 19th century. Most notable are the writings of Thomas Carlyle and Francis Galton, whose works have prompted decades of research.[4] In Heroes and Hero Worship (1841), Carlyle identified the talents, skills, and physical characteristics of men who rose to power. In Galton's Hereditary Genius (1869), he examined leadership qualities in the families of powerful men. After showing that the numbers of eminent relatives dropped off when moving from first degree to second degree relatives, Galton concluded that leadership was inherited. Rise of alternative theories[edit] In the late 1940s and early 1950s, however, a series of qualitative reviews of these studies (e.g., Bird, 1940;[5] Stogdill, 1948;[6] Mann, 1959[7]) prompted researchers to take a drastically different view of the driving forces behind leadership. Reemergence of trait theory[edit] Attribute pattern approach[edit] B.F.

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Masculinity Masculinity is a set of qualities, characteristics or roles generally considered typical of, or appropriate to, a man. It can have degrees of comparison: "more masculine", "most masculine'". The opposite can be expressed by terms such as "unmanly" or epicene.[1] A near-synonym of masculinity is virility (from Latin vir, man). Constructs of masculinity vary across historical and cultural contexts. The dandy, for instance, was regarded as an ideal of masculinity in the 19th century, but is considered effeminate by modern standards.[2] Traditional masculine norms, as described in Dr. Leadership lessons from the Royal Navy - McKinsey Quarterly - Organization - Strategic Organization Britain’s Royal Navy is a disciplined command-and-control organization that moves across 140 million square miles of the world’s oceans. Although few environments are tougher than a ship or submarine, I’ve been struck, while conducting research on the Royal Navy, by the extent to which these engines of war run on “soft” leadership skills. For officers leading small teams in constrained quarters, there’s no substitute for cheerfulness and effective storytelling. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that naval training is predicated on the notion that when two groups with equal resources attempt the same thing, the successful group will be the one whose leaders better understand how to use the softer skills to maintain effort and motivate. I believe that the same principle holds true for business.

Teamwork Hauling in a mooring line. Problems solving: Strategy formulation Problems solving: Team coordination Teamwork is "work done by several associates with each doing a part but all subordinating personal prominence to the efficiency of the whole" .[1] In a business setting accounting techniques may be used to provide financial measures of the benefits of teamwork which are useful for justifying the concept.[2] Teamwork is increasingly advocated by health care policy makers as a means of assuring quality and safety in the delivery of services; a committee of the Institute of Medicine recommended in 2000 that patient safety programs "establish interdisciplinary team training programs for providers that incorporate proven methods of team training, such as simulation.

Lewin's Leadership Styles: The Three Major Leadership Styles By Kendra Cherry Updated December 03, 2015. A leadership style refers to a leader's characteristic behaviors when directing, motivating, guiding and managing groups of people. Great leaders can inspire political movements and social change. They can also motivate others to perform, create and innovate.

Injury The knee of a patient is examined with help of radiography after an injury. An injury is damage to a biological organism caused by physical harm.[1] Major trauma is injury that can potentially lead to serious outcomes. Classification[edit] The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics developed the Occupational Injury and Illness Classification System (OIICS). Business Model Canvas Business Model Canvas: nine business model building blocks, Osterwalder, Pigneur & al. 2010 The Business Model Canvas is a strategic management and lean startup template for developing new or documenting existing business models.[1][2] It is a visual chart with elements describing a firm's or product's value proposition, infrastructure, customers, and finances.[3] It assists firms in aligning their activities by illustrating potential trade-offs. The Business Model Canvas was initially proposed by Alexander Osterwalder[4] based on his earlier work on Business Model Ontology.[5] Since the release of Osterwalder's work in 2008, new canvases for specific niches have appeared, such as the Lean Canvas.[6] The Business Model Canvas[edit] Formal descriptions of the business become the building blocks for its activities.

Loyalty There are many aspects to loyalty. John Kleinig, professor of Philosophy at City University of New York, observes that over the years the idea has been treated by writers from Aeschylus through John Galsworthy to Joseph Conrad, by psychologists, psychiatrists, sociologists, scholars of religion, political economists, scholars of business and marketing, and — most particularly — by political theorists, who deal with it in terms of loyalty oaths and patriotism. As a philosophical concept, loyalty was largely untreated by philosophers until the work of Josiah Royce, the "grand exception" in Kleinig's words.[1] John Ladd, professor of Philosophy at Brown University writing in the Macmillan Encyclopaedia of Philosophy in 1967, observes that by that time the subject had received "scant attention in philosophical literature".

The Meaning(s) of Teacher Leadership in an Urban High School Reform Education Administration Quarterly legitimized roles, institutionally legitimized content area expertise, and gen-dered leadership roles. Significance: Because leadership is a cultural con-struct itself, this study brings to the foreground the meaning(s) of teacherleadership from teachers’ perspectives and how these meanings reward oreclipse actual leadership practices. This is especially salient for researchersand leaders interested in the role of teacher leadership in nurturing democraticschool communities.

Risk Risk is the potential of losing something of value, weighed against the potential to gain something of value. Values (such as physical health, social status, emotional well being or financial wealth) can be gained or lost when taking risk resulting from a given action, activity and/or inaction, foreseen or unforeseen. Risk can also be defined as the intentional interaction with uncertainty. Risk perception is the subjective judgment people make about the severity of a risk, and may vary person to person. Any human endeavor carries some risk, but some are much riskier than others.[1]

What High-Quality Revenue Looks Like - Anthony Tjan Growth. In my world of venture capital, we hear all the time that growth drives value. It is how some investors justify putting sky-high valuations on companies that are growing, but not yet making any money. Social responsibility Social responsibility is an ethical theory that an entity, be it an organization or individual, has an obligation to act to benefit society at large. Social responsibility is a duty every individual has to perform so as to maintain a balance between the economy and the ecosystems. A trade-off may[citation needed] exist between economic development, in the material sense, and the welfare of the society and environment.

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