background preloader

Gospel of Matthew

Gospel of Matthew
The Gospel According to Matthew (Greek: κατὰ Ματθαῖον εὐαγγέλιον, kata Matthaion euangelion, τὸ εὐαγγέλιον κατὰ Ματθαῖον, to euangelion kata Matthaion) (Gospel of Matthew or simply Matthew) is one of the four canonical gospels, one of the three synoptic gospels, and the first book of the New Testament. The narrative tells how the Messiah, Jesus, rejected by Israel, finally sends the disciples to preach his Gospel to the whole world. The Gospel of Matthew is generally believed to have been composed between 70 and 110, with most scholars preferring the period 80–90; a pre-70 date remains a minority view, but has been strongly supported. The anonymous author was probably a highly educated Jew, intimately familiar with the technical aspects of Jewish law, and the disciple Matthew was probably honored within his circle. Composition and setting[edit] Evangelist Mathäus und der Engel by Rembrandt Composition[edit] Setting[edit] Structure and content[edit] Structure[edit] Theology[edit] Related:  Sea of Faithsort

Gospel of Mark The Gospel According to Mark (Greek: τὸ κατὰ Μᾶρκον εὐαγγέλιον, to kata Markon euangelion), the second book of the New Testament, is one of the four canonical gospels and the three synoptic gospels. It was traditionally thought to be an epitome (summary) of Matthew, which accounts for its place as the second gospel in the Bible, but most contemporary scholars now regard it as the earliest of the gospels. Most modern scholars reject the tradition which ascribes it to Mark the Evangelist, the companion of Peter, and regard it as the work of an unknown author working with various sources including collections of miracle stories, controversy stories, parables, and a passion narrative. Composition and setting[edit] Composition[edit] The two-source hypothesis: Most scholars agree that Mark was the first of the gospels to be composed, and that the authors of Matthew and Luke used it plus a second document called the Q source when composing their own gospels. Setting[edit] Structure[edit] 1.

Gospel of Luke The Gospel According to Luke (Greek: Τὸ κατὰ Λουκᾶν εὐαγγέλιον, to kata Loukan euangelion), commonly shortened to the Gospel of Luke or simply Luke, is the third and longest of the four Gospels. This synoptic gospel is an account of the life and ministry of Jesus of Nazareth. It details his story from the events of his birth to his Ascension. According to the preface,[1] the purpose of Luke is to write an historical account,[2] while bringing out the theological significance of the history.[3] Nevertheless, ancient authors emphasized plausibility rather than truth and mixed intentional fiction in with their biography; the claim that the evangelist wrote with historical intentions does not guarantee the preservation of historical facts. Most modern critical scholarship concludes that Luke used the Gospel of Mark for his chronology and a hypothetical sayings source Q document for many of Jesus's teachings. Title[edit] Composition[edit] Synoptic Gospels[edit] Sources[edit] L source[edit]

Gospel of John The Gospel of John (also referred to as the Gospel According to John, the Fourth Gospel, or simply John) is one of the four canonical gospels in the Christian Bible. In the New Testament it traditionally appears fourth, after the synoptic gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke. John begins with the witness and affirmation of John the Baptist and concludes with the death, burial, resurrection, and post-resurrection appearances of Jesus. Chapter 21 states that the book derives from the testimony of the "disciple whom Jesus loved" and early church tradition identified him as John the Apostle, one of Jesus' Twelve Apostles. Raymond E. Composition[edit] Authorship[edit] The gospel identifies its author as "the disciple whom Jesus loved." The earliest manuscripts to contain the beginning of the gospel (Papyrus 66 and Papyrus 75), dating from around the year 200, entitle the gospel "The Gospel according to John". Sources[edit] Order of material[edit] Signs Gospel[edit] Discourses[edit] Inspiration[edit]

The Corinthians in Corinthians Figure Analysis The Corinthians sure get lots of screen time in the Bible, but just who were they? And why does Paul spend so much time writing letters to their little neck of the woods? The Corinth of Old Ancient Corinth was a lovely little town, which was located in the southern part of Greece on the Isthmus of Corinth. See, Corinth was pretty cosmopolitan at the time (for a place that didn't have flushing toilets, that is): Corinth was home to major seaports, which meant its exports of bronze and terra cotta always sold well.It was a major manufacturing and commercial hub of the ancient world. Paul's Arrival in Greece So Paul hits Corinth and establishes a church pretty quickly. Not quite. Sin's Really Got a Hold on Them The Corinthians get a bad wrap for being a bunch of ancient sinners and sex freaks. "Fornicators, idolaters, adulterers, male prostitutes, sodomites, thieves, the greedy, drunkards, revilers, robbers […] this is what some of you used to be" (1 Corinthians 6:9-11). Wrong:

"Is Creatio Ex Nihilo A Post-Biblical Invention? An Examination Of Gerhard May's Proposal" by Paul Copan * Paul Copan is a Ph.D. student at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. "Let this, then, be maintained in the first place, that the world is not eternal, but was created by God." - John Calvin, Genesis I. Introduction The noted philosopher of science Ian Barbour has boldly declared, "Creation ‘out of nothing' is not a biblical concept Genesis portrays the creation of order from chaos, and ... the ex nihilo doctrine was formulated later by the church fathers to defend theism against an ultimate dualism or a monistic pantheism. [p.78] still need to defend theism against alternative philosophies, but we can do so without reference to an absolute beginning.[3] Now if it can continue to be shown that the Big Bang is the most convincing scientific theory, Barbour states, "the theist can indeed see it as an instant of divine origination." [p.79] May's book serves as a convenient entré into a new examination of creation ex nihilo. II. [p.80] [p.81] has not co-existed from eternity with God.

The Idiot's Guide To Adding Website Bookmarks On Your Google Chrome New Tab Page For the past couple of years now, I have more or less been exclusively using Google Chrome as my day-to-day work browser. And it works pretty much the way I want it to, with its speed and its synchronization with my Google account. Chrome is simply one of the best products that Google has ever produced. But saying that, there are some irritating things about Chrome that really bother me. One of them was not being able to bookmark any site I wanted to on my New Tab page. But now I have found the solution and I want to share it with all of you. Now first of all, to clear up any potential misunderstandings, when I say “bookmarks”, I don’t mean regular bookmarks like these : No, in actual fact, what I am talking about are these : When you open a new tab page in Chrome, you are presented with logos of sites to open. So today I am going to show you how to make New Tab Page bookmarks for any site you want. New Tab Page Bookmarks Recipe Ingredients Step 1 – Make The Folder Step 2 – Make The Script

First Council of Nicaea The First Council of Nicaea (/naɪ'si:ə/; Greek: Νίκαια /'ni:kaɪja/ Turkish: Iznik) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Nicaea in Bithynia by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in AD 325. This first ecumenical council was the first effort to attain consensus in the church through an assembly representing all of Christendom.[5] Its main accomplishments were settlement of the Christological issue of the nature of the Son of God and his relationship to God the Father,[3] the construction of the first part of the Creed of Nicaea, establishing uniform observance of the date of Easter,[6] and promulgation of early canon law.[4][7] Overview[edit] Eastern Orthodox icon depicting the First Council of Nicaea The First Council of Nicaea was the first ecumenical council of the Church. Another result of the council was an agreement on when to celebrate Easter, the most important feast of the ecclesiastical calendar, decreed in an epistle to the Church of Alexandria in which is simply stated:

What does the Bible say about an out of body experience / astral projection? Question: "What does the Bible say about an out of body experience / astral projection?" Answer: Information about the "out-of-body” experience is both vast and subjective. According to Wikipedia, one out of ten people claims to have had an out-of-body experience (OBE), and there are many different types of the experiences claimed. They range from involuntary out-of-body experiences or near-death experiences that happen after or during a trauma or accident, to what is called “astral projection" in which a person voluntarily tries to leave his/her body behind and ascend to a spiritual plane where he/she believes he/she will find truth and clarity. A few famous Christians have had what might be called, in today’s world, an out-of-body experience, most notably the Apostle Paul. A voluntary out-of-body experience, or an “astral projection,” is a different story. One concrete example of this comes from the popular book 90 Minutes in Heaven by Pastor Don Piper. Related Topics: Return to:

Collect, Extract & Organize Research Fast With Summary Pro for iPad The Internet makes researching most topics fast and easy, and when it comes to managing those documents, notes, and clippings, Summary Pro ($2.99) for iPad takes some beating. Web annotation services like Diigo (one of my favorites) and the clipping features provided by Evernote are great for collecting, organizing, and reviewing research, but Summary Pro streamlines the note clipping process and helps keep your research organized. How It Works Summary Pro includes an in-built web browser which can clip anything on a webpage and save it to a folder with the swipe of your finger. So for example, you can do Google search for “climate change.” As you browse and read articles and documents, you can tap on one of three cutting tools (rectangle, circle, or free hand) and select content you want to clip and save. Next, swipe the selection to the left and it gets saved in a folder. All of your collected clippings can be exported in a PDF document or printed directly from Summary Pro. Handy App

Psychology and Alchemy Psychology and Alchemy is Volume 12 in The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, a series of books published by Princeton University Press in the U.S. and Routledge & Kegan Paul in the U.K. It is study of the analogies between alchemy, Christian dogma, and psychological symbolism.[1] Detailed abstracts of each chapter are available online.[3] Overview[edit] In this book, Jung argues for a reevaluation of the symbolism of Alchemy as being intimately related to the psychoanalytical process. In drawing these parallels Jung reinforces the universal nature of his theory of the archetype and makes an impassioned argument for the importance of spirituality in the psychic health of the modern man. Also interesting about this book is that patient whose dreams are being analyzed in the second section is the physicist Wolfgang Pauli, who would go on to collaborate with Jung on such ideas as the acausal connection principle of synchronicity. Content[edit] Part I. Part II. Chapter 1 - Introduction[edit]

On Dawkins The Protestant Atheism of Richard Dawkins Lourdes Dawkins starts his travels with a visit to Lourdes. the hard fact is, over the years, with their millions of pilgrims, there have been 66 supposed miracles and adds that the cures were all from afflictions that may clear up naturally anyway: you don't get severed legs regenerating at Lourdes. The Catholic priest from whom Dawkins has elicited the statistic also points out that millions of visitors to Lourdes have benefited spiritually. Millions Now, not that it really matters, Dawkins was correct that the 66 miracles prove nothing. A single blow Why Dawkins should ignore the millions and focus on the 66 is explicable in various ways. Again, we can recognise in Dawkins and in other militant freethinkers the urge to come up with some clincher that will demonstrate the falsehood of religious belief once and for all, some kind of polemical equivalent of a medical magic bullet for wiping out disease. Protestant roots The Assumption

"Thouh art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church." (97) by morgangh Feb 21

Related: