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Rule of three (writing)

Rule of three (writing)
The rule of three is a writing principle that suggests that things that come in threes are inherently funnier, more satisfying, or more effective than other numbers of things.[citation needed] The reader or audience of this form of text is also more likely to consume information if it is written in groups of threes. From slogans ("Go, fight, win!") to films, many things are structured in threes. Examples include The Three Stooges, Three Little Pigs, Three Billy Goats Gruff, Goldilocks and the Three Bears and the Three Musketeers. A series of three often creates a progression in which the tension is created, built up, and finally released. The Latin phrase, "omne trium perfectum" (everything that comes in threes is perfect, or, every set of three is complete) conveys the same idea as the rule of three. In comedy, it is also called a comic triple. Snow White receives three visits from her wicked stepmother In many tales, three tasks must be performed to reach a certain goal. Related:  General ResourcesWays Places Means

5 Ways Your Brain Sabotages Your Writing... And What To Do About It When we sit at the keyboard, we rely on our brains to help us fill that vast white space with intriguing words, well-rounded characters, and watertight plot twists. Sometimes our brains oblige. But more often, our grey matter tells us that we should check Twitter (because what if our blog post got a retweet from someone important?), that we totally have time to catch up on TV while we eat lunch (because that’s just smart multitasking right there!) Psychologists have identified all sorts of cognitive biases and mental tomfoolery that turn your mind against you every day. Escalation of Commitment Your brain says: “You’ve put so much time and effort into writing this story, it’d be crazy not to finish.” Imagine you’re an eccentric millionaire—probably wearing a monocle—who has spent two years and close to $100,000 creating a desk featuring cool-water sprinklers for those working in hot climes. When the situation is more relatable, Escalation of Commitment kicks in. Solutions: Price: $18.02

Writing Writing with a pen Writing is a medium of communication that represents language through the inscription of signs and symbols. In most languages, writing is a complement to speech or spoken language. Writing is not a language but a form of technology. Within a language system, writing relies on many of the same structures as speech, such as vocabulary, grammar and semantics, with the added dependency of a system of signs or symbols, usually in the form of a formal alphabet. As human societies emerged, the development of writing was driven by pragmatic exigencies such as exchanging information, maintaining financial accounts, codifying laws and recording history. Means for recording information[edit] H.G. Writing systems[edit] The major writing systems – methods of inscription – broadly fall into four categories: logographic, syllabic, alphabetic, and featural. Logographies[edit] A logogram is a written character which represents a word or morpheme. Syllabaries[edit] Alphabets[edit]

Persuasive Writing - Emotional vs Intellectual Words I have written about persuasive writing in an article where I discuss Ethos, Logos, Pathos. Persuasive writers use words to convince the reader to listen or to act. I found this useful list of words in an interesting article called Common words that suck emotional power out of your content by John Gregory Olson. He explains how words have emotions attached to them, and that you should choose the correct ones for the response you want to elicit from your reader. Use these words if you want to get an emotional, rather than an intellectual, response from your readers. Click on the link to read the full article. by Amanda Patterson © Amanda Patterson

Spiral Ring Copper Wire Ring Czech Glass Red by StonetreeJewelry Practical Tips on Writing a Book from 22 Brilliant Authors | NeuroTribes Hello there! If you enjoy the content on Neurotribes, consider subscribing for future posts via email or RSS feed. Steve Silberman reading at the Booksmith in SF. Photo by Heather Champ. I love books. My late father Donald, who taught Wordsworth and Melville to inner-city kids for decades, used to read Ulysses to me while he carried me on his shoulders. The subject of my book is autism, the variety of human cognitive styles, and the rise of the neurodiversity movement. The science of developmental disorders has made significant advances in recent years, and some of the social issues that I raised in the piece — such as the contributions that people with atypical cognitive styles have made to the progress of science, technology, and culture — seem more relevant than ever. I’ve signed a contract with a wonderful publisher — a Penguin imprint called Avery Books — and a sharp and enthusiastic editor named Rachel Holtzman. I’m not sentimental about old media vs. new media. Carl Zimmer

75 Books Every Writer Should Read Whether you want to make writing your career or just want to know how to improve your writing so that you can pass your college courses, there is plenty of reading material out there to help you get inspired and hone your skills. Here’s a collection of titles that will instruct you on just about every aspect of writing, from the basics of grammar to marketing your completed novel, with some incredibly helpful tips from well-known writers themselves as well. Writing Basics These books address things like structure, plot, descriptions and other basic elements of any story. The Power of Myth by Joseph Campbell and Bill Moyers: You can improve the quality of your writing by adding a mythical quality to them with advice and insight from this book. Advice from Authors Who better to give advice on writing than those who have made a name for themselves doing it? On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King: This is widely regarded as one of the best books for any aspiring author to read.

The Ultimate Guide to Writing Better Than You Normally Do. Writing is a muscle. Smaller than a hamstring and slightly bigger than a bicep, and it needs to be exercised to get stronger. Think of your words as reps, your paragraphs as sets, your pages as daily workouts. Think of your laptop as a machine like the one at the gym where you open and close your inner thighs in front of everyone, exposing both your insecurities and your genitals. Because that is what writing is all about. Procrastination is an alluring siren taunting you to google the country where Balki from Perfect Strangers was from, and to arrange sticky notes on your dog in the shape of hilarious dog shorts. The blank white page. Mark Twain once said, “Show, don’t tell.” Finding a really good muse these days isn’t easy, so plan on going through quite a few before landing on a winner. There are two things more difficult than writing. It’s no secret that great writers are great readers, and that if you can’t read, your writing will often suffer.

Intercon O Welcome to the home of Intercon O, the premiere multi-genre Live Action Role Playing (LARP) "convention in the world. Intercon O is the eighteenth Intercon in the Boston area, and we're planning on making it the best ever. If you love to LARP, then Intercon O is the place you want to be. If you're already signed up for Intercon O, or have attended a previous New England Intercon you can login here. There are still openings in these great games! Intercon O is brought to you by NEIL, New England Interactive Literature, as one of the semi-annual Live Action Role-Playing conventions of the Live Action RolePlayers Association. Our goal is to bring together the best LARPs we can find, of all styles and genres, in one weekend, so that you can't help but find a game or three (or five!) Intercons are organized and run by a large group of volunteers, all of whom are LARP enthusiasts. Copyright © 2014, New England Interactive Literature All Rights Reserved

25 Things Every Writer Should Know An alternate title for this post might be, “Things I Think About Writing,” which is to say, these are random snidbits (snippets + tidbits) of beliefs I hold about what it takes to be a writer. I hesitate to say that any of this is exactly Zen (oh how often we as a culture misuse the term “Zen” — like, “Whoa, that tapestry is so cool, it’s really Zen“), but it certainly favors a sharper, shorter style than the blathering wordsplosions I tend to rely on in my day-to-day writing posts. Anyway. Feel free to disagree with any of these; these are not immutable laws. Buckle up. 1. The Internet is 55% porn, and 45% writers. 2. A lot of writers try to skip over the basics and leap fully-formed out of their own head-wombs. 3. Some writers do what they do and are who they are because they were born with some magical storytelling gland that they can flex like their pubococcygeus, ejaculating brilliant storytelling and powerful linguistic voodoo with but a twitch of their taint. 4. 5. Luck matters.

LitReactor How to Become a Writing Rockstar: A Simple Guide Do you want to become a writing rockstar? Have you ever felt like you could be more? I’m talking about that feeling deep down that nudges you forward with your writing. That feeling that tells you that you are good enough, that you can become a real writing rockstar. But it’s not that easy. Something elusive that doesn’t seem to go away. Can you let it be and still go after your dreams? Let’s explore that question. What is a Writing Rockstar? Before we do anything, we have to define what a writing rockstar is. You see, you’re already a writing rockstar. If you want to do that, that’s fine. This is about doing what makes your heart sing. Society imposes standards on us, but they are irrelevant. Why Become a Writing Rockstar? Because it’s what you want. You don’t need a reason to go after your dreams. You just have to take action. When you embrace your dreams, and you start going after them without needing permission from anyone, your life will change. The 3 Fears Holding You Back 1. 2. 3.

Story Map The Story Map interactive includes a set of graphic organizers designed to assist teachers and students in prewriting and postreading activities. The organizers are intended to focus on the key elements of character, setting, conflict, and resolution development. Students can develop multiple characters, for example, in preparation for writing their own fiction, or they may reflect on and further develop characters from stories they have read. After completing individual sections or the entire organizer, students have the ability to print out their final versions for feedback and assessment. Grades K – 2 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Collaborative Stories 1: Prewriting and Drafting Students hone their teamwork skills and play off each other's writing strengths as they participate in prewriting activities for a story to be written collaboratively by the whole class. Grades K – 2 | Lesson Plan | Unit Comparing Fiction and Nonfiction with "Little Red Riding Hood Text" Sets back to top

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