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Rule of three (writing)

Rule of three (writing)
The rule of three is a writing principle that suggests that things that come in threes are inherently funnier, more satisfying, or more effective than other numbers of things.[citation needed] The reader or audience of this form of text is also more likely to consume information if it is written in groups of threes. From slogans ("Go, fight, win!") to films, many things are structured in threes. Examples include The Three Stooges, Three Little Pigs, Three Billy Goats Gruff, Goldilocks and the Three Bears and the Three Musketeers. A series of three often creates a progression in which the tension is created, built up, and finally released. The Latin phrase, "omne trium perfectum" (everything that comes in threes is perfect, or, every set of three is complete) conveys the same idea as the rule of three. In comedy, it is also called a comic triple. Snow White receives three visits from her wicked stepmother In many tales, three tasks must be performed to reach a certain goal.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_three_(writing)

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