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Paris Now and Then (1940s) : Classic Photography

Inflation and the Fall of the Roman Empire [This is a transcript of Professor Joseph Peden's 50-minute lecture "Inflation and the Fall of the Roman Empire," given at the Seminar on Money and Government in Houston, Texas, on October 27, 1984. The original audio recording is available as a free MP3 download.] Two centuries ago, in 1776, there were two books published in England, both of which are read avidly today. One of them was Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations and the other was Edward Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. Gibbon's multivolume work is the tale of a state that survived for twelve centuries in the West and for another thousand years in the East, at Constantinople. Gibbon, in looking at this phenomenon, commented that the wonder was not that the Roman Empire had fallen, but rather that it had lasted so long. I've been asked to speak on the theme of Roman history, particularly the problem of inflation and its impact. Monetary, fiscal, military, political, and economic issues are all very much intertwined.

49 Beautiful Shots Of Edinburgh | ScottishApartment.com Edinburgh Apartments from ScottishApartment.com 49 Beautiful Shots Of Edinburgh We love, really love our city. There is something in Edinburgh for everyone, to prove this we have gathered 49 of our favourite photos of Edinburgh. Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here Original here © 2010 ScottishApartment.com - Apartments in Edinburgh

ENIGMA'S SECRET TWIN SPOOKS AND PATENTS | October 22nd 2008 Why didn’t Germany crack the British codes during the second world war? Alan Judd does some digging in the archives to find out ... From INTELLIGENT LIFE magazine, Autumn 2008 Most of us know the story of Enigma, the German cipher machine eventually broken by clever people at MI6's country house, Bletchley Park, following brilliant early work by Polish mathematicians. In the 1920s a German company, Enigma Chiffriermaschinen Aktiengesellschaft (ECA), marketed Enigma and the German government bought and developed it. Given that, I wondered, how did they not learn that the British were reading Enigma in the war? The story began in 1928 when the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS)--forerunner of GCHQ and then part of MI6--acquired two Enigma machines at the Admiralty's request. There were three British patents but Lywood began adapting it regardless, with help from GC&CS. Picture credit: x_jamesmorris (via Flickr)

Fiche pratique: utiliser un réseau social en classe Laurence Juin pratique l'utilisation de Twitter dans un cadre pédagogique depuis deux ans. Elle guide les autres enseignants tentés par l'expérience. Vous voulez introduire les réseaux sociaux du Net dans votre pédagogie ? Voici quelques conseils et pistes de réflexion avant de se lancer : conseils que je donne de par mes deux ans d’expérience et de recul avec l’usage de Twitter en classe. Je prends donc en exemple dans cette fiche pratique le réseau social Twitter mais c’est adaptable à d’autres comme Facebook. Tweeter en classe mais pour quoi faire? On n’entre pas avec sa classe dans un réseau social comme on entrerait n’importe où. Quand l’utiliser ? L’usage peut se restreindre uniquement sur le temps de classe proprement dit. Cette extension sur le temps péri-scolaire est à contrôler. Les échanges sur Twitter sont souvent a-synchrones. Tweeter avec un compte classe ou des comptes élèves ? Un compte classe est souvent le plus adapté avec les classes de primaire et de collège.

Artist Jack Long creates incredible pictures of flowers using drops of paint By Daily Mail Reporter Published: 17:49 GMT, 23 May 2012 | Updated: 06:50 GMT, 25 May 2012 At first glance, these incredible images look like still-life portraits of flowers. But far from being drawn in the traditional way, they are created by photographing fast-moving droplets of paint as they fall through the air. Artist Jack Long, 53, spends months painstakingly planning and testing each work before capturing them with a high-speed camera. Blooming marvellous! Paint-ently clever: Artist Jack Long uses water mixed with thickeners and dyes and then uses a flash to capture the right moment as the mixture falls through the air Glossy finish: Jack, from Wisconsin, U.S., calls the work 'Vessels and Blooms' and says he enjoys working with liquids because 'all the pictures are different' However, Jack is keen to keep his technique to himself and will not reveal exactly how his pieces are created. He uses water mixed with thickeners, pigments and dyes.

List of common misconceptions From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This incomplete list is not intended to be exhaustive. This list corrects erroneous beliefs that are currently widely held about notable topics. Each misconception and the corresponding facts have been discussed in published literature. Note that each entry is formatted as a correction; the misconceptions themselves are implied rather than stated. Arts and culture Food and cooking Roll-style Western sushi. Searing meat does not "seal in" moisture, and in fact may actually cause meat to lose moisture. Legislation and crime Literature The Harry Potter books, though they have broken children's book publishing records, have not led to an increase in reading among children or adults, nor slowed the ongoing overall decline in book purchases by Americans, and children who did read the Harry Potter books were not more likely to go on to read more outside of the fantasy and mystery genres.[21][22][23][24] Music Religion Hebrew Bible Buddhism Christianity Islam Sports

Restart My Heart The 5 Most Mind-Blowing Acts of Battlefield Mercy in History Mercy isn't a part of any army's strategy. Combat training is about eliminating any doubts or sympathy that might make a recruit hesitate at the wrong second. When his own life -- and the life of everyone in the unit -- is at stake, there's no time to stop and ask, "But won't this Nazi's wife miss him?" That kind of thing gets you killed. And yet, inspiring stories of mercy on the battlefield do turn up all through history. #5. British soldier Patrick Ferguson was an expert marksman who invented his own rifle and created his own sniping unit. Ferguson was reckoned to be the best shot in all of the British forces during the Revolutionary War. Getty"Boo! In September 1777, Ferguson was involved in the Battle of Brandywine. "But wait!" Getty"OK, now I just feel like a jerk." Noticing him, one of the officers quickly galloped off, giving Ferguson the clearest shot yet. But he was only known as "That what's-his-name who invented the Ferguson rifle." #4. "They are too adorable to kill." #3.

Authentic Video Clips: Using YouTube to Teach French Language and Culture to Kids What did I do before YouTube? Seriously . . . how did I teach? Short, authentic video clips have become a standard part of my French lessons. It’s now common practice for me to search YouTube for my lesson content and theme. This week I was teaching about pigs and other farm animals as a prelude to “The Three Little Pigs.” I hope this list has sparked some ideas for ways you can use YouTube video clips in French or any other target language. Enjoy exploring language and culture through the authentic video clips on YouTube! p.s.

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