background preloader

Why Arts Education Is Crucial, and Who's Doing It Best

Why Arts Education Is Crucial, and Who's Doing It Best
"Art does not solve problems, but makes us aware of their existence," sculptor Magdalena Abakanowicz has said. Arts education, on the other hand, does solve problems. Years of research show that it's closely linked to almost everything that we as a nation say we want for our children and demand from our schools: academic achievement, social and emotional development, civic engagement, and equitable opportunity. Involvement in the arts is associated with gains in math, reading, cognitive ability, critical thinking, and verbal skill. It has become a mantra in education that No Child Left Behind, with its pressure to raise test scores, has reduced classroom time devoted to the arts (and science, social studies, and everything else besides reading and math). This erosion chipped away at the constituencies that might have defended the arts in the era of NCLB -- children who had no music and art classes in the 1970s and 1980s may not appreciate their value now. Reviving Arts Education Related:  Teaching Techniquescreativity

Deep and Surface learning It is important to clarify what they are not. Although learners may be classified as “deep” or “surface”, they are not attributes of individuals: one person may use both approaches at different times, although she or he may have a preference for one or the other. They correlate fairly closely with motivation: “deep” with intrinsic motivation and “surface” with extrinsic, but they are not necessarily the same thing. Either approach can be adopted by a person with either motivation. There is a third form, known as the “Achieving” or strategic approach, which can be summarised as a very well-organised form of Surface approach, and in which the motivation is to get good marks. Time to 'fess up: I was that strategic learner. The features of Deep and Surface approaches can be summarised thus: (based on Ramsden, 1988) The Surface learner is trying to “suss out” what the teacher wants and to provide it, and is likely to be motivated primarily by fear of failure. Two other points: More on Marton

Can Creativity be Taught? Results from creativity studies Creativity at Work In 1968, George Land distributed among 1,600 5-year-olds a creativity test used by NASA to select innovative engineers and scientists. He re-tested the same children at 10 years of age, and again at 15 years of age. Test results amongst 5 year olds: 98% Test results amongst 10 year olds: 30% Test results amongst 15 year olds: 12% Same test given to 280,000 adults: 2% “What we have concluded,” wrote Land, “is that non-creative behavior is learned.” (Sources: Escape from the Maze: Increasing Individual and Group Creativity by James Higgins; also George Land and Beth Jarman, Breaking Point and Beyond. Why aren’t adults as creative as children? For most, creativity has been buried by rules and regulations. Can Creativity Skills be Taught? Yes, creativity skills can be learned. Over the course of the last half century, numerous training programs intended to develop creativity capacities have been proposed. Creativity is a skill that can be developed and a process that can be managed.

Successful Learning: Peer Learning Many institutions of learning now promote instructional methods involving ‘active’ learning that present opportunities for students to formulate their own questions, discuss issues, explain their viewpoints, and engage in cooperative learning by working in teams on problems and projects. ‘Peer learning’ is a form of cooperative learning that enhances the value of student-student interaction and results in various advantageous learning outcomes. To realise the benefits of peer learning, teachers must provide ‘intellectual scaffolding’. Peer Learning Strategies To facilitate successful peer learning, teachers may choose from an array of strategies: Buzz Groups: A large group of students is subdivided into smaller groups of 4–5 students to consider the issues surrounding a problem. Critique sessions, role-play, debates, case studies and integrated projects are other exciting and effective teaching strategies that stir students’ enthusiasm and encourage peer learning. Successful Peer Learning

Art in Schools Inspires Tomorrow's Creative Thinkers Without the arts, education's grade is Incomplete. Education minus art? Such an equation equals schooling that fails to value ingenuity and innovation. The word art, derived from an ancient Indo-European root that means "to fit together," suggests as much. Art is about fitting things together: words, images, objects, processes, thoughts, historical epochs. It is both a form of serious play governed by rules and techniques that can be acquired through rigorous study, and a realm of freedom where the mind and body are mobilized to address complex questions -- questions that, sometimes, only art itself can answer: What is meaningful or beautiful? To erase art, as the Taliban did by turning explosives on the colossal centuries-old Buddhas of Bamiyan along the ancient Silk Road through Afghanistan, is to deny the reality of human differences and historical change. "Life is short, and art long," reads the Hippocratic aphorism. Jeffrey T.

Richard Felder: Resources in Science and Engineering Education Richard Felder's Home Page Richard M. Felder Dr. Richard Felder and Rebecca Brent's blog. Creativity—It’s our future | Creativity in Education Share this Episode Please select a language: Autoplay End of Video Show End Screen Default Quality Adjust your embed size below, then copy and paste the embed code above. Community Translation Episode available in 2 languages Available Translations: Join the Community Translation Project Thanks for your interest in translating this episode! Please Confirm Your Interest Thanks for your interest in adding translations to this episode! An error occurred while processing your request. Another translator has already started to translate this episode. Thanks for Participating! This episode has been assigned to you and you can expect an e-mail shortly containing all the information you need to get started. About This Episode Adobe's vision on creativity in education.

Interns - Tutor/Mentor Connection You only need 3 things to be creative | Create and Connect According to Teresa Amabile, you ‘only’ need three ingredients to be creative: source: Teresa Amabile 'How to Kill Creativity' KnowledgeToolsMotivation Great, you say, I know quite a few things, I have some tools in my shed and I am motivated to bits. Bring it on! Not so fast! Knowledge: You need to have some expertise, or surround yourself with some experts, on the subject you want to be creative on. In just one day, Create and Connect can teach you some tools that will start making a difference in your private life or business. Sign up for one of our next Creative Thinking Trainings. For details about the Creativity Trio, read Amabile’s article ‘How to kill creativity.’

What is PBL? To help teachers do PBL well, we created a comprehensive, research-based model for PBL — a "gold standard" to help teachers, schools, and organizations to measure, calibrate, and improve their practice. In Gold Standard PBL, projects are focused on student learning goals and include Essential Project Design Elements: Five Future Trends That Will Impact the Learning Ecosystem As summer reflections on the past school year turn into aspirations for the next year, it's important to keep in mind the big picture of change in education. Five shifts in how we think about schools and education in general will help to regenerate the learning ecosystem, and will provoke our imagination about new possibilities for teaching and learning. 1. Democratized Entrepreneurship Democratized entrepreneurship will spread an entrepreneurial mindset among learners, educators and communities, accelerating a groundswell of grassroots innovation. Entrepreneurship is no longer reserved for those few with the resources to buffer risk and the social capital to access expertise and guidance. To take advantage of this trend: Begin to cultivate an edupreneurial mindset of experimentation, risk-taking, learning from failure, creative problem-solving, and market awareness in your classroom, and expand it to your school and district. 2. 3. 4. 5.

» Use the Pygmalion Effect to Create a High Performing Team the awesome culture blog “High expectations are the key to everything.” - Sam Walton The Pygmalion Effect Study In the 1960s, Harvard psychology professor Robert Rosenthal teamed up with South San Francisco elementary school principal Lenore Jacobson to conduct what later became known as the Pygmalion Effect study. In the study, 20% of the students within each of 18 elementary school classrooms were randomly assigned to a ‘high achiever’ group, with the remaining 80% serving as the control group. The teachers in those classrooms were told that these particular students in the ‘high achiever’ group had a superior IQ; even though the students were in fact chosen at random. “When teachers expect students to do well and show intellectual growth, they do; when teachers do not have such expectations, performance and growth are not so encouraged and may in fact be discouraged in a variety of ways.” Marva Collins Pygmalion in Management J. “A manager’s expectations are key to a subordinate’s performance and development.” 1.

Related: