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Your Picks: Top 100 Science-Fiction, Fantasy Books More than 5,000 of you nominated. More than 60,000 of you voted. And now the results are in. The winners of NPR's Top 100 Science-Fiction and Fantasy survey are an intriguing mix of classic and contemporary titles. A quick word about what's here, and what's not: Our panel of experts reviewed hundreds of the most popular nominations and tossed out those that didn't fit the survey's criteria (after — we assure you — much passionate, thoughtful, gleefully nerdy discussion). So, at last, here are your favorite science-fiction and fantasy novels. More than 5,000 of you nominated. A quick word about what's here, and what's not: Our panel of experts reviewed hundreds of the most popular nominations and tossed out those that didn't fit the survey's criteria (after — we assure you — much passionate, thoughtful, gleefully nerdy discussion). So, at last, here are your favorite science-fiction and fantasy novels.

Odd Origins of Idioms In the heyday of sailing ships, all war ships and many freighters carried iron cannons. Those cannons fired round iron cannon balls. It was necessary to keep a good supply near the cannon. However, how to prevent them from rolling about the deck? The best storage method devised was a square-based pyramid with one ball on top, resting on four resting on nine, which rested on sixteen. The solution was a metal plate called a 'Monkey' with 16 round indentations. Few landlubbers realize that brass contracts much more and much faster than iron when chilled. Most Anticipated: The Great 2012 Book Preview 2012 is shaping up to be another exciting year for readers. While last year boasted long-awaited novels from David Foster Wallace, Haruki Murakami, and Jeffrey Eugenides, readers this year can look forward to new Toni Morrison, Richard Ford, Peter Carey, Lionel Shriver, and, of course, newly translated Roberto Bolaño, as well as, in the hazy distance of this coming fall and beyond, new Michael Chabon, Hilary Mantel, and John Banville. We also have a number of favorites stepping outside of fiction. Marilynn Robinson and Jonathan Franzen have new essay collections on the way. A pair of plays are on tap from Denis Johnson. A new W.G. The list that follows isn’t exhaustive – no book preview could be – but, at 8,400 words strong and encompassing 81 titles, this is the only 2012 book preview you will ever need. January or Already Out: The Flame Alphabet by Ben Marcus: No venom seems more befitting an author than words, words, words. At Last and The Patrick Melrose Novels by Edward St. March:

Mind42: Free online mind mapping software Books of the Year 2011 - Magazine The Atlantic’s literary editor picks the five best of the crop. The Hare With Amber Eyes Edmund de Waal FSG This rueful family memoir is also a vividly episodic history of 19th- and 20th-century Europe, and a plangent consideration of the pleasures and fleetingness of aesthetic and familial happiness. Letters to Monica Philip Larkin, edited by Anthony Thwaite Faber and Faber Even as this book chronicles an almost passionless and far from conventionally happy relationship, it yields moments of exquisite tenderness and acuity, while obliquely showing the civilizing effect that even the most trying woman can exert on even the most impossible man. The Complete Architecture of Adler & Sullivan Richard Nickel and Aaron Siskind, with John Vinci and Ward Miller Richard Nickel Committee This publishing feat illuminates some of the most beautiful and influential art that America has produced. Saints and Sinners: Stories Edna O’Brien Back Bay Emily, Alone Stewart O’Nan Viking

50 Most Influential Books of the Last 50 (or so) Years In compiling the books on this list, the editors at SuperScholar have tried to provide a window into the culture of the last 50 years. Ideally, if you read every book on this list, you will know how we got to where we are today. Not all the books on this list are “great.” The criterion for inclusion was not greatness but INFLUENCE. All the books on this list have been enormously influential. The books we chose required some hard choices. We also tried to keep a balance between books that everyone buys and hardly anyone reads versus books that, though not widely bought and read, are deeply transformative. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 45.

Invitation to World Literature Greek, by Euripides, first performed in 405 BCE The passionate loves and longings, hopes and fears of every culture live on forever in their stories. Here is your invitation to literature from around the world and across time. Sumerian, 2600 BCE and older Turkish, by Orhan Pamuk, 2000 Greek, by Homer, ca. eighth century BCE Greek, by Euripides, first performed in 405 BCE Sanskrit, first century CE Japanese, by Murasaki Shikibu, ca. 1014 Chinese, by Wu Ch'êng-ên, ca. 1580 Quiché-Mayan, written in the Roman alphabet ca. 1550s French, by Voltaire, 1759 English, by Chinua Achebe, 1959 Spanish, by Gabriel García Márquez, 1967 English, by Arundhati Roy, 1998 Arabic, first collected ca. fourteenth century

The New Canon

I like that this list is customizable by age group, genre, award winning, etc. This function will make it easy to find books by certain topics that are needed for teachers and students. by kmeghanlewis Sep 20

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