background preloader

Discworld

Discworld
Related:  Littérature

Terry Pratchett Pratchett was the UK's best-selling author of the 1990s,[6][7] and has sold over 85 million books worldwide in 37 languages.[8][9] He is currently the second most-read writer in the UK, and seventh most-read non-US author in the US.[10] Pratchett was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1998 and was knighted for services to literature in the 2009 New Year Honours.[11][12] In 2001 he won the annual Carnegie Medal for The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents, the first Discworld book marketed for children.[13][14] He received the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement in 2010. In December 2007, Pratchett announced that he was suffering from early-onset Alzheimer's disease.[15] Subsequently he made a substantial public donation to the Alzheimer's Research Trust,[16] and filmed a programme chronicling his experiences with the disease for the BBC. Background[edit] Early life[edit] Early career[edit] Current life[edit] Alzheimer's disease[edit] Interests[edit]

Religions of the Discworld Gods[edit] The Discworld, being a flat disc supported on the backs of four elephants on top of a giant flying turtle, exists in a region of the universe where reality is somewhat less consistent than it appears in our own, more mundane corner of existence. Because reality on the Disc is so fragile and malleable, belief has a tendency to take on a life of its own, and Gods are far more obvious to the people of the Disc than they appear to us. Gods are everywhere on the Discworld, a crucial element of the world's peculiar ecology that gives power to belief and demands resolution to any and all narratives. Gods on the Discworld exist as long as people believe in them and their power grows as their followers increase. The Disc also has an almost infinite number of small gods, typically spiritual beings with very little power and no followers. Religions[edit] The main religion on the Disc appears to be polytheism. Omnianism[edit] Djelibeybian religion[edit] Voodoo[edit] The Way of Mrs. Hell[edit]

Happy With Hospital Birth Flowers for Algernon Flowers for Algernon is a science fiction short story and subsequent novel written by Daniel Keyes. The short story, written in 1958 and first published in the April 1959 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1960.[2] The novel was published in 1966 and was joint winner of that year's Nebula Award for Best Novel (with Babel-17).[3] The eponymous Algernon is a laboratory mouse who has undergone surgery to increase his intelligence by artificial means. The story is told by a series of progress reports written by Charlie Gordon, the first human test subject for the surgery, and it touches upon many different ethical and moral themes such as the treatment of the mentally disabled.[4][5] Background[edit] Different characters in the book were also based on people in Keyes's life. Publication history[edit] Synopsis[edit] Short story[edit] Novel[edit] Charlie Gordon, 32 years of age, suffers from phenylketonuria and has an IQ of 68. Style[edit]

Discworld: The Ankh Morpork Map For iPad Scott Pilgrim A film adaptation of the series titled Scott Pilgrim vs. the World starring actor Michael Cera in the title role was released in August 2010. A videogame of the same name developed by Ubisoft for PlayStation Network and Xbox Live Arcade was released the same month. Development[edit] O'Malley wanted to write a shōnen-style comic book series, but initially he had only read one series, Ranma 1/2; in the early 2000s North America did not yet have a significant Japanese comic book industry. O'Malley used black and white because it was less expensive than creating the series in color, and so O'Malley said that he "embraced the B&W manga aesthetic".[6] When writing the series, O'Malley's first step was developing the direction of the story by creating notes in notebooks, sketchbooks, and computer text files. O'Malley said that he expected Scott Pilgrim to sell around 1,000 copies. O'Malley said that the most difficult portion of Scott Pilgrim to write was the ending. Plot summary [edit]

Discworld (world) Great A'Tuin is the Giant Star Turtle (of the fictional species: Chelys galactica) who travels through the Discworld universe's space, carrying four giant elephants (named Berilia, Tubul, Great T'Phon, and Jerakeen) who in turn carry the Discworld. The narration has described A'Tuin as "the only turtle ever to feature on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram." Great A'Tuin's gender is unknown (though in The Colour of Magic Pratchett describes the turtle as male)[citation needed], but the subject of much speculation by some of the Disc's finest scientific minds. The sex of the World Turtle is pivotal in proving or disproving a number of conflicting theories about the destination of Great A'Tuin's journey through the cosmos. If, as the Discworld version of the popular "big bang theory" states, Great A'Tuin is moving from the Birthplace to the Time of Mating, then at the point of mating the civilizations of the Disc might be crushed, simply slide off, or else the entire world will end.

Wonkette — The D.C. Gossip The Shock Doctrine The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism is a 2007 book by the Canadian author Naomi Klein, and is the basis of a 2009 documentary by the same name directed by Michael Winterbottom.[1] The book argues that libertarian free market policies (as advocated by the economist Milton Friedman) have risen to prominence in some developed countries because of a deliberate strategy by some political leaders. These leaders exploit crises to push through controversial exploitative policies while citizens are too emotionally and physically distracted by disasters or upheavals to mount an effective resistance. The book implies that some man-made crises, such as the Iraq war, may have been created with the intention of pushing through these unpopular policies in their wake. Synopsis[edit] The book has an introduction, a main body and a conclusion, divided into seven parts with a total of 21 chapters. [edit] Favorable[edit] Paul B. Mixed[edit] Unfavorable[edit] Awards[edit] See also[edit]

Bryan Lee O'Malley Bryan Lee O'Malley (born 21 February 1979)[1] is a Canadian cartoonist, best known for the Scott Pilgrim series. He is also a musician using the alias Kupek. Career[edit] Bryan Lee O'Malley started in Film Studies at the University of Western Ontario, but dropped out before completing.[1] Prior to having his own material published, O'Malley illustrated the Oni Press miniseries Hopeless Savages: Ground Zero, written by Jen Van Meter. The film adaptation of his Scott Pilgrim series, Scott Pilgrim vs. He is also a songwriter and musician (as Kupek and formerly in several short-lived Toronto bands such as Imperial Otter). Personal life[edit] O'Malley is half Korean and half French-Canadian.[3] He is married to cartoonist Hope Larson. Awards[edit] Bibliography[edit] Graphic novels[edit] Short stories[edit] Discography[edit] Credited as Kupek References[edit] External links[edit]

Ankh-Morpork Tallinn, one of the real-life prototypes of Ankh-Morpork In The Art of Discworld Pratchett explains that the city is similar to Tallinn and central Prague, but adds that it has elements of 18th century London, 19th century Seattle and modern New York City. He also states that since the creation of The Streets of Ankh-Morpork, he has tried to ensure that the descriptions of character movements and locations in the books match the Ankh-Morpork map; this has allowed him, and fans of the series, to visualise the story more clearly. Geography[edit] Ankh-Morpork lies on the River Ankh (the most polluted waterway on the Discworld and reputedly solid enough to walk on), where the fertile loam of the Sto Plains (similar to Western Europe) meets the Circle Sea (the Discworld's version of the Mediterranean). Lying approximately equidistant from the cold Hub and tropical Rim, Ankh-Morpork is in the Discworld's equivalent of the temperate zone. The River Ankh[edit] History[edit] Politics[edit]

The Rebel Sell : This Magazine // Canadian progressive politics, environment, art, culture // Subscribe today If we all hate consumerism, how come we can’t stop shopping? Do you hate consumer culture? Angry about all that packaging? Irritated by all those commercials? Worried about the quality of the “mental environment”? This might seem at odds with the economic facts of the 1990s—a decade that gave us the “extreme shopping” channel, the dot-com bubble, and an absurd orgy of indulgence in ever more luxurious consumer goods. What can we conclude from all this? The answer is simple. That last sentence is worth reading again. This isn’t because the authors, directors or editors are hypocrites. One of the most talked-about cinematic set-pieces in recent memory is the scene in Fight Club where the nameless narrator (Ed Norton) pans his empty apartment, furnishing it piece by piece with Ikea furniture. In many ways, this scene is just a cgi-driven update of the opening pages of John Updike’s Rabbit, Run. 1. 2. 3. 4. Let’s be friends! Carolyn: Your father and I were just discussing his day at work.

The New York Trilogy The New York Trilogy is a series of novels by Paul Auster. Originally published sequentially as City of Glass (1985), Ghosts (1986) and The Locked Room (1986), it has since been collected into a single volume. Plot introduction[edit] Ostensibly presented as detective fiction, the stories of The New York Trilogy have been described as "meta-detective-fiction", "anti-detective fiction", "mysteries about mysteries", a "strangely humorous working of the detective novel", "very soft-boiled", a "metamystery" and a "mixture between the detective story and the nouveau roman"[citation needed]. This may classify Auster as a postmodern writer whose works are influenced by the "classical literary movement" of American postmodernism through the 1960s and 70s[citation needed]. A 2006 reissue by Penguin Books is fronted by new pulp magazine-style covers by comic book illustrator Art Spiegelman. City of Glass[edit] "City of Glass" has an intertextual relationship with Cervantes' Don Quixote. Ghosts[edit]

Scott Pilgrim - Comics By Bryan Lee O'Malley

Related: