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Terry Pratchett

Pratchett was the UK's best-selling author of the 1990s,[6][7] and has sold over 85 million books worldwide in 37 languages.[8][9] He is currently the second most-read writer in the UK, and seventh most-read non-US author in the US.[10] Pratchett was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1998 and was knighted for services to literature in the 2009 New Year Honours.[11][12] In 2001 he won the annual Carnegie Medal for The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents, the first Discworld book marketed for children.[13][14] He received the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement in 2010. In December 2007, Pratchett announced that he was suffering from early-onset Alzheimer's disease.[15] Subsequently he made a substantial public donation to the Alzheimer's Research Trust,[16] and filmed a programme chronicling his experiences with the disease for the BBC. Background[edit] Early life[edit] Early career[edit] Current life[edit] Alzheimer's disease[edit] Interests[edit]

Discworld (world) Great A'Tuin is the Giant Star Turtle (of the fictional species: Chelys galactica) who travels through the Discworld universe's space, carrying four giant elephants (named Berilia, Tubul, Great T'Phon, and Jerakeen) who in turn carry the Discworld. The narration has described A'Tuin as "the only turtle ever to feature on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram." Great A'Tuin's gender is unknown (though in The Colour of Magic Pratchett describes the turtle as male)[citation needed], but the subject of much speculation by some of the Disc's finest scientific minds. The little turtles have since gone off on their own journeys. Great A'Tuin has been mentioned to frequently roll on its belly to avoid asteroid and comet collisions, or even to snatch these projectiles out of the sky which might otherwise destroy the Disc. The Disc itself is described as roughly 10,000 miles wide, giving it a surface area two-fifths that of the Earth, which would make it roughly the size of the Pacific Ocean.

Johnny Depp Early life 1960s–1970s Depp was born in Owensboro, Kentucky in 1963,[7][8] as the youngest of four children of Betty Sue Palmer (née Wells), a waitress, and John Christopher Depp, a civil engineer.[10] Depp moved frequently during his childhood, and he and his siblings lived in more than 20 different locations, settling in Miramar[11] Florida, in 1970. In 1978, when he was 15, Depp's parents divorced.[11][12] His mother married, as her second husband, Robert Palmer (died 2000), whom Depp has called "an inspiration to me".[13] Depp engaged in self-harm when he was young, due to the stress of dealing with family problems, which resulted in several self-inflicted scars. 1980s On December 24, 1983, Depp married Lori Anne Allison, the sister of his band's bass player and singer. Acting career Television roles Film roles Critics have described Depp's roles as characters who are "iconic loners Future roles

Robert A. Heinlein Robert Anson Heinlein (/ˈhaɪnlaɪn/ HYN-lyn;[1][2][3] July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was an American science fiction writer. Often called the "dean of science fiction writers",[4] he was one of the most influential and controversial authors of the genre in his time. He set a standard for scientific and engineering plausibility, and helped to raise the genre's standards of literary quality. He was one of the first science fiction writers to break into mainstream magazines such as The Saturday Evening Post in the late 1940s. A notable writer of science fiction short stories, Heinlein was one of a group of writers who came to prominence under the editorship of John W. Life[edit] Birth and childhood[edit] Heinlein was born on July 7, 1907 to Rex Ivar Heinlein (an accountant) and Bam Lyle Heinlein, in Butler, Missouri. [edit] California[edit] In 1934, Heinlein was discharged from the Navy due to pulmonary tuberculosis. Author[edit] WikiMiniAtlas When Robert A. Later life and death[edit]

Elric of Melniboné Elric of Melniboné[1] is a fictional character created by Michael Moorcock, and the antihero of a series of sword and sorcery stories centring in an alternate Earth. The proper name and title of the character is Elric VIII, 428th Emperor of Melniboné. Later novels by Moorcock mark Elric as a facet of the Eternal Champion. Elric first appeared in print in Moorcock's novella, "The Dreaming City" (Science Fantasy No. 47, June 1961); subsequent novellas were reformatted as the novel Stormbringer (1965), but his first appearance in an original novel wasn't until 1973 in Elric of Melniboné. Moorcock's albino character is one of the better known in fantasy literature, having crossed over into multimedia, such as comics and film, though efforts towards the latter stalled over the years. The novels have been continuously in print since the 1970s. Fictional history[edit] Elric is described by his creator, in the first book, Elric of Melniboné, as follows: Influences[edit] Novels[edit] Chronology[edit]

Bob Kane Bob Kane (born Robert Kahn; October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book artist and writer, credited along with Bill Finger as the creator of the DC Comics superhero Batman. He was inducted into the comic-book industry's Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1994 and into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 1996. Early life and work[edit] Comics[edit] He entered the comics field two years later, in 1936, freelancing original material to editor Jerry Iger's comic book Wow, What A Magazine! Batman[edit] Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). Bill Finger joined Bob Kane's nascent studio in 1938. ...had an idea for a character called 'Batman', and he'd like me to see the drawings. Finger said he offered such suggestions as giving the character a cowl and scalloped cape instead of wings; adding gloves; leaving the mask's eyeholes blank to connote mystery; and removing the bright red sections of the original costume, suggesting instead a gray-and-black color scheme. Robin[edit] [edit]

Anaïs Nin Anaïs Nin (Spanish: [anaˈis ˈnin]; born Angela Anaïs Juana Antolina Rosa Edelmira Nin y Culmell, February 21, 1903 – January 14, 1977) was an author born to Spanish-Cuban parents in France, where she was also raised. She spent some time in Spain and Cuba but lived most of her life in the United States where she became an established author. She published journals (which span more than 60 years, beginning when she was 11 years old and ending shortly before her death), novels, critical studies, essays, short stories, and erotica. Early life[edit] Anaïs Nin was born in Neuilly, France, to artistic parents. On March 3, 1923, in Havana, Cuba, Nin married her first husband, Hugh Parker Guiler (1898–1985), a banker and artist, later known as "Ian Hugo" when he became a maker of experimental films in the late 1940s. In the late summer of 1939, when residents from overseas were urged to leave France due to the approaching war, Nin left Paris and returned to New York City with her husband. Notes

Michael Moorcock Michael John Moorcock (born 18 December 1939) is an English writer, primarily of science fiction and fantasy, who has also published literary novels. He is best known for his novels about the anti-hero Elric of Melniboné, a seminal influence on the field of fantasy in the 1960s and 1970s. In 2008, The Times newspaper named Moorcock in their list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945".[3] Biography[edit] Michael Moorcock was born in London in 1939 and the landscape of London, particularly the area of Notting Hill Gate and Ladbroke Grove, is an important influence in some of his fiction (cf. the Cornelius novels). Moorcock has mentioned The Gods of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Apple Cart by George Bernard Shaw and The Constable of St. Moorcock is the former husband of Hilary Bailey. Moorcock was the subject of two book-length works, a monograph and an interview, by Colin Greenland. In the 1990s, he moved to Texas in the United States. Views on politics[edit] Writer[edit]

Bill Finger Milton "Bill" Finger[1] (February 8, 1914[2] – January 18, 1974[1][3]) was an American comic strip and comic book writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series' development. Years after Finger's death, Kane acknowledged his contributions. Finger also wrote many of the original 1940s Green Lantern stories and would go on to contribute to the development of numerous comic book series. He was posthumously inducted into the comic book industry's Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1994 and the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 1999. His name provided the basis for the Bill Finger Award, founded by Jerry Robinson and presented annually at the San Diego Comic-Con International to honor excellence in comic book writing. Early life and career[edit] ...had an idea for a character called 'Batman', and he'd like me to see the drawings. Robin was an outgrowth of a conversation I had with Bob. Green Lantern[edit]

Dr. Seuss Theodor Seuss Geisel (/ˈɡaɪzəl/; March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991) was an American writer, poet, and cartoonist. He was most widely known for his children's books written and illustrated as Dr. Seuss. He had used the pen name Dr. Theophrastus Seuss in college and later used Theo LeSieg and Rosetta Stone.[2] He was a perfectionist in his work and would sometimes spend up to a year on a book. Geisel's birthday, March 2, has been adopted as the annual date for National Read Across America Day, an initiative on reading created by the National Education Association. Life and career College Geisel attended Dartmouth College, graduating in 1925.[11] At Dartmouth, he joined the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity[4] and the humor magazine Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern, eventually rising to the rank of editor-in-chief.[4] Early career Essomarine Geisel gained a significant public profile through a program for motor boat lubricants produced by Standard Oil under the brand name Essomarine. World War II-era work

Eternal Champion The Eternal Champion is a fictional creation of the author Michael Moorcock and is a recurrent feature in many of his novels. About the Eternal Champion[edit] The fictional Multiverse, which consists of several universes, many layered dimensions, spheres, and alternative worlds, is the place where the eternal struggle between Law and Chaos, the two main forces of Moorcock's worlds, takes place. In all these dimensions and worlds, these forces constantly war for supremacy. Since the victory of Law or Chaos would cause the Multiverse either to become permanently static or totally formless, the Cosmic Balance enforces certain limits which the powers of Law and Chaos violate at their peril. The Eternal Champion, a Hero who exists in all dimensions, times and worlds, is the one who is chosen by fate to fight for the Cosmic Balance; however, he often does not know of his role, or, even worse, he struggles against it, never to succeed. Incarnations of the Eternal Champion[edit] Vol. 2: Von Bek

Pim van Lommel Pim van Lommel (born 15 March 1943) is a Dutch cardiologist and scientist. Biography[edit] Van Lommel is best known for his scientific work on the subjects of near-death experiences and consciousness, including a prospective study published in the medical journal The Lancet.[1] He gained public attention as the author of the 2007 Dutch bestseller titled: Eindeloos Bewustzijn: een wetenschappelijke visie op de Bijna-Dood Ervaring[2] (English: Endless Consciousness: A scientific approach to the near-death experience), which has been translated to German, English, French and Spanish. The English translation is titled: Consciousness Beyond Life, The Science of the Near-Death Experience (Harper Collins, 2010). In his book Consciousness Beyond Life: The Science of the Near-Death Experience, he postulates a model where consciousness is beyond neurological activities of the brain. Van Lommel studied medicine at Utrecht University, specializing in cardiology. Criticism[edit] References[edit]

Solomon Kane Solomon Kane is a fictional character created by the pulp-era writer Robert E. Howard. A late 16th/early 17th century Puritan, Solomon Kane is a somber-looking man who wanders the world with no apparent goal other than to vanquish evil in all its forms. His adventures, published mostly in the pulp magazine Weird Tales, often take him from Europe to the jungles of Africa and back. Howard described him as a sombre and gloomy man of pale face and cold eyes, all of it shadowed by a slouch hat. Stories[edit] Most of the Solomon Kane stories were first published in Weird Tales. "Red Shadows"[edit] Weird Tales (August 1928) featuring "Red Shadows", the first Solomon Kane story First published in Weird Tales, August 1928, alternatively titled "Solomon Kane". "Skulls in the Stars"[edit] First published in Weird Tales, January 1929. "Rattle of Bones"[edit] First published in Weird Tales, June 1929. "The Moon of Skulls"[edit] First published in Weird Tales, Part 1, June 1930; Part 2, July 1930. [edit]

Clara Schumann Clara Schumann (née Clara Josephine Wieck; 13 September 1819 – 20 May 1896) was a German musician and composer, considered one of the most distinguished pianists of the Romantic era. She exerted her influence over a 61-year concert career, changing the format and repertoire of the piano recital and the tastes of the listening public. Her husband was the composer Robert Schumann. Early life[edit] Clara Josephine Wieck was born in Leipzig on 13 September 1819 to Friedrich Wieck and Marianne Wieck (née Tromlitz).[2] Marianne Tromlitz was a famous singer in Leipzig at the time and was singing solos on a weekly basis at the well-known Gewandhaus in Leipzig.[3] The differences between her parents were irreconcilable, in large part due to her father's unyielding nature.[3] After an affair between Clara's mother and Adolph Bargiel, her father's friend,[4] the Wiecks divorced in 1824 and Marianne married Bargiel. Child prodigy[edit] Later career[edit] Legacy[edit] Drawing of Schumann (date unknown)

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