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Dabrowski’s Theory and Existential Depression in Gifted Children and Adults

Dabrowski’s Theory and Existential Depression in Gifted Children and Adults
Webb, J, Ph.D. When people undergo a great trauma or other unsettling event—they have lost a job or a loved one dies, for example—their understanding of themselves or of their place in the world often disintegrates, and they temporarily "fall apart," experiencing a type of depression referred to as existential depression. It's very hard to keep your spirits up. When people undergo a great trauma or other unsettling event—they have lost a job or a loved one dies, for example—their understanding of themselves or of their place in the world often disintegrates, and they temporarily "fall apart," experiencing a type of depression referred to as existential depression. It has been my experience that gifted and talented persons are more likely than those who are less gifted to experience spontaneous existential depression as an outgrowth of their mental and emotional abilities and interactions with others. Background Existential Issues and Giftedness Existential Issues and Dabrowski’s Theory Dr. Related:  Health SensitivitiesEverything in your mind

Misdiagnosis and dual diagnosis of gifted children Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnosis of Gifted Children Authors: James T. Webb, Edward R. Amend, Nadia E. Citation: Abstracted from Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children and Adults: ADHD, bipolar, OCD, Asperger’s, depression, and other disorders. (2004) Scottsdale: Great Potential Press. Many gifted and talented children (and adults) are being mis-diagnosed by psychologists, psychiatrists, pediatricians, and other health care professionals. In some situations where gifted children have received a correct diagnosis, giftedness is still a factor that must be considered in treatment, and should really generate a dual diagnosis. Despite prevalent myths to the contrary, gifted children and adults are at particular psychological risk due to both internal characteristics and situational factors. Internal Factors First, let me mention the internal aspects (Webb, 1993). Situational Factors Situational factors are highly relevant to the problem of mis-diagnosis (Webb, 1993).

Overexcitability and the Gifted Overexcitability and the Gifted by Sharon Lind A small amount of definitive research and a great deal of naturalistic observation have led to the belief that intensity, sensitivity and overexcitability are primary characteristics of the highly gifted. These observations are supported by parents and teachers who notice distinct behavioral and constitutional differences between highly gifted children and their peers. The work of Kazimierz Dabrowski, (1902-1980), provides an excellent framework with which to understand these characteristics. Dabrowski, a Polish psychiatrist and psychologist, developed the Theory of Positive Disintegration as a response to the prevalent psychological theories of his time. OVEREXCITABILITIES Overexcitabilities are inborn intensities indicating a heightened ability to respond to stimuli. PSYCHOMOTOR OVEREXCITABILITY Psychomotor OE is a heightened excitability of the neuromuscular system. Show how to find the answers to questions.

Top 10 Thinking Traps Exposed Our minds set up many traps for us. Unless we’re aware of them, these traps can seriously hinder our ability to think rationally, leading us to bad reasoning and making stupid decisions. Features of our minds that are meant to help us may, eventually, get us into trouble. Here are the first 5 of the most harmful of these traps and how to avoid each one of them. 1. “Is the population of Turkey greater than 35 million? Lesson: Your starting point can heavily bias your thinking: initial impressions, ideas, estimates or data “anchor” subsequent thoughts. This trap is particularly dangerous as it’s deliberately used in many occasions, such as by experienced salesmen, who will show you a higher-priced item first, “anchoring” that price in your mind, for example. What can you do about it? Always view a problem from different perspectives. 2. In one experiment a group of people were randomly given one of two gifts — half received a decorated mug, the other half a large Swiss chocolate bar. 3. 4.

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Your Brain Knows a Lot More Than You Realize | Memory, Emotions, & Decisions Meanwhile, a similar story was unfolding oceans away. During World War II, under constant threat of bombings, the British had a great need to distinguish incoming aircraft quickly and accurately. Which aircraft were British planes coming home and which were German planes coming to bomb? Several airplane enthusiasts had proved to be excellent “spotters,” so the military eagerly employed their services. These spotters were so valuable that the government quickly tried to enlist more spotters—but they turned out to be rare and difficult to find. The government therefore tasked the spotters with training others. It was a grim attempt. With a little ingenuity, the British finally figured out how to successfully train new spotters: by trial-and-error feedback. The Knowledge GapThere can be a large gap between knowledge and awareness. Consider patients with anterograde amnesia, who cannot consciously recall new experiences in their lives. What Douglas experienced is called anosognosia.

Contrasting and categorization of emotions The contrasting and categorisation of emotions describes how emotions are thought to relate to each other. Various recent proposals of such groupings are described in the following sections. Contrasting Basic Emotions[edit] The following table,[1] based on a wide review of current theories, identifies and contrasts the fundamental emotions according to a set of definite criteria. HUMAINE's proposal for EARL (Emotion Annotation and Representation Language)[edit] The emotion annotation and representation language (EARL) proposed by the Human-Machine Interaction Network on Emotion (HUMAINE) classifies 48 emotions.[2] Parrott's emotions by groups[edit] A tree-structured list of emotions was described in Parrott (2001).[3][unreliable source?] Plutchik's wheel of emotions[edit] Plutchik's Wheel of Emotions Robert Plutchik created a wheel of emotions in 1980 which consisted of 8 basic emotions and 8 advanced emotions each composed of 2 basic ones.[5] See also[edit] References[edit] External links[edit]

Counseling Gifted Adults – A Case Study Counseling Gifted Adults – A Case Study Gifted children are often identified by their insatiable curiosity, advanced mental ability, intensity, and thought-provoking questions. But what happens when these children become adults? What are they like and do they have any particular mental health needs? This paper uses a case study of one particular gifted adult to explain the typical issues these clients bring into counseling. Most of us can recognize precocious children by noticing any or all of the following: thought provoking questions, advanced vocabulary, avid reading, unstoppable curiosity, creative thinking, and unusual mental, academic, and/ or musical abilities. But what happens when these children become adults? The concept of giftedness, especially in adults, is unclear, complicated and controversial. In adults, as well as children, giftedness is a whole-person phenomenon. Case Background Susan had known that she was different since she was seven. This was unusual. Schooling

What Magnetic Fields Do to Your Brain and Body - The Crux (Credit: pippeeContributor/Shutterstock) There’s no escaping magnetic fields—they’re all around us. For starters, the Earth itself is like a giant magnet. A spinning ball of liquid iron in our planet’s core generates the vast magnetic field that moves our compass needles around and directs the internal compasses of migrating birds, bats, and other animals. On top of that, ever-industrious humans have produced artificial magnetic fields with power lines, transport systems, electrical appliances, and medical equipment. We may not be able to see, hear, feel, or taste the magnetic fields that surround us, but some may wonder whether they can still exert effects on our bodies and brains. Everyday Exposure A magnetic field arises whenever a charged particle, like an electron or proton, moves around. From time to time, a scientific study finds a link between living near high-voltage power lines and illness. An MRI machine. What’s the Threshold? Medical Magnets Out-of-this-World Magnetic Fields

The Battle for Your Mind: Brainwashing Techniques Being Used On The Public By Dick Sutphen Authoritarian followers Mind Control Subliminals By Dick Sutphen Summary of Contents The Birth of Conversion The Three Brain Phases How Revivalist Preachers Work Voice Roll Technique Six Conversion Techniques 1. keeping agreements 2.physical and mental fatigue 3. increase the tension 4. Uncertainty. 5. Summary of Contents The Birth of Conversion/Brainwashing in Christian Revivalism in 1735. I'm Dick Sutphen and this tape is a studio-recorded, expanded version of a talk I delivered at the World Congress of Professional Hypnotists Convention in Las Vegas, Nevada. Although I've been interviewed about the subject on many local and regional radio and TV talk shows, large-scale mass communication appears to be blocked, since it could result in suspicion or investigation of the very media presenting it or the sponsors that support the media. Everything I will relate only exposes the surface of the problem. In talking about this subject, I am talking about my own business. Charles J. Alright.

Sensitivity vs. Allergy - Japanese Acupuncture ClinicJapanese Acupuncture Clinic Food Sensitivities Testing is not as same as a typical Food Allergy Test (scratch test) that you might have done at your allergist’s office. The major difference between Food Allergy and Food Sensitivities is the onset of symptoms. A food sensitivity test is a blood test that examines your immune system’s response to a wide variety of foods and chemicals. The Difference between Food Allergy and Food Sensitivities Food Allergy (IgE): Food Allergy is much more easily diagnosed because its onset is faster, from immediate to 1 hour after ingestion. This is IgE reaction. Food Sensitivity (often IgG): Immunologic reaction to food. Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: I had gluten sensitivity for many years and I could not put the pieces together the gluten is the root cause even though I use to write a migraine and period notebook. Intolerance: Non-immunologic reaction to food. To learn more about the difference between Food ALLERGY and Food SENSITIVITIES, please visit here.

Be nice not to have regular coherence collapse in order to progress! by soulfiremage Apr 3

This theory is a necessary tool to better understand that the gifted mind tend to go through frequent crisis as a normal developmental course. by coen_groupe4_psy Mar 22

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