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Lost Pyramids and Other Hidden Ancient Artifacts

Lost Pyramids and Other Hidden Ancient Artifacts
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Minoan Culture and its Women RWAAG Home, Minoan Culture--> Minoan Culture Advertisement: Minoan Snake Goddess Sculpture and Jewelry - Herakleion Museum, Crete, 1600BC. Shop in a catalog of almost everything Buy Greek items on Amazon.com Advertiser Specials, Discounts, Sales, and Savings If you click above and follow the links to a purchase then this site receives a commission for its support. The Minoan culture was an ancient culture that survived on the island of Crete of what is now Greece for almost 2000 years until about 1450 BCE For about 3000 years until the early part of the Twentieth Century this culture was entirely unknown. An image on a pot of a labrus image by which Evans was able to connect to the Minoan Culture to ancient writing found by him on Crete. There are a number of powerful reasons for studying the Minoan culture and its women including its obvious influence. The Romans and later European cultures knew nothing of a culture on Crete that predated the ancient Greeks. Minoan Clothing

Archaeologists Excavate a Lost Kingdom Buried Beneath Volcanic Ash Like Pompeii, evidence shows a human settlement frozen in time by volcanic pyroclastic flows. In 1980, people began to take notice when workers from a commercial logging company began dredging up pottery fragments and bones in an area near the little village of Pancasila on the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia. Other locals began finding coins, brassware and charred timber in the same region, all buried beneath a thick layer of volcanic deposits. The finds were not far from the foot of the Tambora volcano, a volcano that, in April of 1815, produced the largest eruption in recorded history. Acting on the discovery of these finds in 2004, Volcanologist Haraldur Sigurdsson of the University of Rhode Island began investigating the jungle-shrouded area by using Ground Penetrating Radar. Sigurdsson's discovery touched off a series of formal excavations beginning in 2006 and continuing to this day under the direction of Dr M. One victim who was discovered during the 2009 excavations.

Unexplained Mysteries of LOST LANDS Many western cultures have myths of lost lands, where once lived our great ancestors. Typical is Lyonesse, a fabled land once said to exist between Land’s End and the Scilly Isles, off the British coast. On this land stood the city of Lions and some 140 churches. Another such fable concerns Atland. Some lost lands are more modern, and said to be rationally theorised to have existed. In the 1870s, the idea was taken up by the likes of Huxley and Wallace, leading scientists of their day. A further lost land is Mu, which, according to former Bengal Lancer, Col James Churchward, existed in the Pacific Ocean. As we can see, most of these lost lands are quite fanciful, but share a similar psychology to other forms of lost worlds. Shambhala was immortalised in the western mind by the hit film, Lost Horizon, based in the fantastic and mystical lost world of Shangri-la. The kingdom itself is said to be shaped as an eight-petalled lotus blossom. Why is this the case? Liked it ?

Does Archeology Support the Bible? A Look at the Evidence Is there archeological evidence to support the authenticity of the Bible? Are there actual archeological digs that have unearthed artifacts that are relevant to the recorded stories in the Bible? Here is an actual look at real evidence that has been discovered by archeologists. What is Archeology? Archeology is a science. It is the scientific study of material remains that authenticate the remains of human activities, civilizations, and life. Archeology is demonstrating that the Bible is truly reliable and accurate as written. Archeology and the Bible The Bible is a book that is full of historical accounts covering thousands of years and multiple nations and peoples. Every year we find another significant find in the Middle East, Africa, and in Europe. Herod’s Inscription Caiaphas’ Ossuary In November, 1990, the bones of Caiaphas the high priest were found in Peace Forest, just south of Jerusalem in an ossuary with the name Caiaphas on it. Seal of Abdi Babylonian Empire The House of David

Jim Cullen, Review of Peter Heather's "Empires and Barbarians: The Fall of Rome and the Birth of Europe" (Oxford, 2012) SOURCE: Special to HNN 8-3-11 Jim Cullen, who teaches at the Ethical Culture Fieldston School in New York, is a book review editor at HNN. His new book, Sensing the Past: Hollywood Stars and Historical Visions, is slated for publication by Oxford University Press later this year. Cullen blogs at American History Now. This book was supposed to be summertime leisure reading. Seven hundred pages and two decades in the making, Empires and Barbarians has the heft of a generational statement. Peter Heather, a professor of medieval history at King's College London, does not deny that the old version of the story is problematic. Here's the key to understanding what happened as far as Heather is concerned: a significant disequilibrium in development -- defined here in terms of resources, technological sophistication and political organization -- that evened out over a five-hundred-year period. This was not a pretty process.

6 Insane Discoveries That Science Can't Explain We like to feel superior to the people who lived centuries ago, what with their shitty mud huts and curing colds by drilling a hole in their skulls. But we have to give them credit: They left behind some artifacts that have left the smartest of modern scientists scratching their heads. For instance, you have the following enigmas that we believe were created for no other purpose than to fuck with future generations. The Voynich Manuscript The Mystery: The Voynich manuscript is an ancient book that has thwarted all attempts at deciphering its contents. It appears to be a real language--just one that nobody has seen before. Translation: "...and when you get her to put the tennis racket in her mouth, have her stand in a fountain for a while. There is not even a consensus on who wrote it, or even when it was written. Why Can't They Solve It? Could you? Don't even try. As you can imagine, proposed solutions have been all over the board, from reasonable to completely clownshit. Our Guess:

Archaeology Daily News - Mystery of Lost Roman City Solved: Ancients Greened the Desert? This page is viewed 610 times National Geographic Today it's a mirage like expanse of monumental ruins. But under the Roman Empire, Palmyra was a trading metropolis, according to historical and archaeological evidence. Despite nearly a century of research, though, a key question remains unanswered: How did this city of 200,000 thrive in the middle of an infertile Syrian desert? Once a required stop on caravan routes that brought Asian goods west to eager Romans, Palmyra has "always been conceived as an oasis in the middle of the desert, but it's never been quite clear what it was living from," said Michal Gawlikowski, the retired head of the University of Warsaw's Polish Mission at Palmyra. And what an oasis: Among the ruins are grand avenues lined with columns, triumphal arches, and the remains of an ancient market where traders once haggled over silk, silver, spices, and dyes from India and China. Nature or Nurture? Tax Haven "It's now clear they were feeding the city." Related News:

Erectile dysfunction in the Middle Ages – historian examines medieval impotence cases Like today, the problem of male impotence in the Middle Ages was often serious, and had important consequences for marriages and families. A recent article deals with the issue, explaining how it showed up in court cases in 14th century York. ‘Privates on Parade: Impotence Cases as Evidence for Medieval Gender’, by Frederick Pederson, a senior lecturer at the University of Aberdeen, analyses two cases where wives attempted to annul their marriages because they claimed their husbands were impotent. They are among six cases from the city’s records that deal with impotence that survive from the Middle Ages. These cases were adjudicated in ecclesiastical courts, also known as consistory courts, where decisions were based on canon law. Pederson notes that in the English cases the court would call upon a number of ‘honest women’ to perform a physical examination of the alleged erectile dysfunction. Within a few days of this testimony the court annulled the marriage.

Famous Ancient Sunken Cities Around the World (PHOTOS) Ruins of numerous such cities, submerged beneath the sea, have been discovered across the world. Most of these finds were a result of the constant effort to find the fictional and lost city of Atlantis, which has many assumptions associated with its actual existence. In March last year, researchers claimed that Atlantis may be found in the marshlands of the Dona Ana Park, southwest Spain, while few months later another research team likened an ancient 56-million-year-old landscape found submerged beneath the North Atlantic Ocean, west of the Orkney-Shetland Islands, to Atlantis. In 1999, British historian and cartographer Jim Allen claimed that the legendary lost city of Atlantis was located where present-day Quillacas is. Know more about some of the famous sunken cities around the world here. Helike, Greece Photo Credit: The Helike Project The ancient Greek city was considered a legend until its discovery in 2001 in the Helike delta. Port Royal, Jamaica Pavlopetri, Greece Yonaguni Ruins.

"Dramatic" New Maya Temple Found, Covered With Giant Faces Some 1,600 years ago, the Temple of the Night Sun was a blood-red beacon visible for miles and adorned with giant masks of the Maya sun god as a shark, blood drinker, and jaguar. Long since lost to the Guatemalan jungle, the temple is finally showing its faces to archaeologists, and revealing new clues about the rivalrous kingdoms of the Maya. Unlike the relatively centralized Aztec and Inca empires, the Maya civilization—which spanned much of what are now Guatemala, Belize, and Mexico's Yucatán region (Maya map)—was a loose aggregation of city-states. (Read about the rise and fall of the Maya in National Geographic magazine.) "This has been a growing awareness to us since the 1990s, when it became clear that a few kingdoms were more important than others," said Brown University archaeologist Stephen Houston, who announced the discovery of the new temple Thursday. El Zotz, in what's now Guatemala, was one of the smaller kingdoms, but one apparently bent on making a big impression.

What Vikings really looked like The fine decoration of the Oseberg ship in Norway, which was buried in the year 834, provides clues to what Vikings looked like. Inside the ship were two women and the archaeologists believe the ship has served as a sarcophagus. (Photo: Annie Dalbéra) There’s no shortage of myths about the appearance of our notorious Viking ancestors. To find out more about these myths, ScienceNordic’s Danish partner site, videnskab.dk, asked its Facebook readers to list their favourite myths about what the Vikings looked like. We have picked out five myths from the resulting debate and asked researchers to help us confirm or bust these myths. Armed with this information, our graphic designer then took a shot at drawing some examples of our infamous forefathers, which you can see in our picture gallery. The five myths are: MYTH 1: Vikings were dirty and unkempt Unwashed, rough warriors with froth hanging out of the corners of the mouth. But that’s unlikely to be true: It wasn’t enough just to be clean.

Top 10 Shocking Documentaries Movies and TV As a visual medium, documentaries frequently succeed in portraying the unimaginable far better then any book alone could do. Beaming everything from the consequences of child abuse to the horrors of nuclear warfare into the homes of millions, the following infamous documentaries shock the viewer and challenge perceptions. Please note: Almost all the videos featured contain graphic and disturbing content, relevant to the topic at hand. Warning: some of these documentaries contain disturbing footage. High on Crack Street Following the struggle of three crack addicts, ‘High on Crack Street’ digs deep into the complex daily lives of individuals striving to obtain their next fix. Aokigahara / Suicide Forest Lying at the base of Mount Fuji, Aokigahara Forest has a rather unsettling reputation as a suicide hotspot . Nuit et Brouillard The Killing of America Interview with a Cannibal What drives a man to kill and cannibalize an innocent woman? Bulgaria’s Abandoned Children

Silchester Iron Age finds reveal secrets of pre-Roman Britain | UK news By the gap in a hedge bordering the entrance off a muddy lane in Hampshire, the young diggers on one of the most fascinating archaeological sites in Britain have made a herb garden: four small square plots. The sudden blast of sunshine after months of heavy rain has brought everything into bloom, and there's a heady scent of curry plant and dill, marigold and mint. Many of the plant seeds are familiar from Roman sites across Britain, as the invaders brought the flavours and the medical remedies of the Mediterranean to their wind-blasted and sodden new territory, but there is something extraordinary about the seeds from the abandoned Iron Age and Roman town of Silchester. The excavation run every summer by Dr Amanda Clarke and Professor Michael Fulford of the archaeology department at Reading University, using hundreds of volunteer students, amateurs and professionals, now in its 15th season, is rewriting British history. And they had olives. Whatever the cause, everyone left.

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