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History of Europe in the 19th century : The Congress of Vienna 1814-1815 (The map as History)

History of Europe in the 19th century : The Congress of Vienna 1814-1815 (The map as History)
Related:  History/GeographyAplicaciones Padres!!

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East Maps can be a powerful tool for understanding the world, particularly the Middle East, a place in many ways shaped by changing political borders and demographics. Here are 40 maps crucial for understanding the Middle East — its history, its present, and some of the most important stories in the region today. Middle East History The fertile crescent, the cradle of civilization The fertile crescent, the cradle of civilizationIf this area wasn't the birthplace of human civilization, it was at least a birthplace of human civilization. Called "the fertile crescent" because of its lush soil, the "crescent" of land mostly includes modern-day Iraq, Syria, Jordan, and Israel-Palestine. (Some definitions also include the Nile River valley in Egypt.) The Middle East today The dialects of Arabic today The dialects of Arabic todayThis map shows the vast extent of the Arabic-speaking world and the linguistic diversity within it. Israel-Palestine Syria Iran Afghanistan Saudi Arabia and Oil Iraq and Libya

Desire2Learn LeaP - LeaP for Desire2Learn See how Desire2Learn LeaP can add value to Desire2Learn courses Personalization and adaptive learning made easy Desire2Learn LeaP (LEArning Path) is now fully integrated with the Desire2Learn® Learning Suite. Create a personalized course with your existing course content Desire2Learn LeaP uses a semantic engine to simplify the process of mapping learning materials to the goals and outcomes selected by the teacher. Let Desire2Learn find your Learning Path The Desire2Learn LeaP recommendation engine suggests the most effective learning paths through each course's materials, and its activity and feedback engines use objective results to identify the most effective learning materials and adapt the learning paths for each student. Rich feature set Key features of Desire2Learn LeaP include: Copyright 2014 Desire2Learn | All Rights Reserved

40 maps that explain the Roman Empire by Timothy B. Lee on August 19, 2014 Two thousand years ago, on August 19, 14 AD, Caesar Augustus died. He was Rome's first emperor, having won a civil war more than 40 years earlier that transformed the dysfunctional Roman Republic into an empire. Under Augustus and his successors, the empire experienced 200 years of relative peace and prosperity. Here are 40 maps that explain the Roman Empire — its rise and fall, its culture and economy, and how it laid the foundations of the modern world. The rise and fall of Rome The rise and fall of RomeIn 500 BC, Rome was a minor city-state on the Italian peninsula. The rise of Rome Rome's military Rome's powerful maniple formation Rome's powerful maniple formationIn the early years of the republic, the Roman infantry used a version of the Greek phalanx. The republic becomes an empire The lost city of Pompeii The eruption of Mount Vesuvius The eruption of Mt. The culture of Rome Roman Britain and the Roman economy The decline of Rome Rome's legacy

10 Resources for Teaching With Primary Sources I'm looking forward to next week's LOC virtual conference on teaching with primary sources. Thinking about the conference prompted me to put together the following collection of resources related to teaching history with primary sources. Before students can work with primary sources they need to understand the differences between primary and secondary sources. Zoom In provides units of lesson plans built around primary source documents. Historical Scene Investigation offers a fun way for students to investigate history through primary documents and images. The World Digital Library hosts more than 10,000 primary documents and images from collections around the world. Who Am I? Student Discovery Sets from the Library of Congress offer primary collections of primary sources in free iBooks. A central part of the Teacher's Page on the Library of Congress website is the primary source center.

J. Rainforest role in the water cycle « Rainforest Conservation Fund Freshwater is an essential resource which is under increasing pressure. Dams and other diversionary activities, particularly agriculture, have diverted a huge amount of the world’s fresh water for human use. Humans now use more than 50% of the available fresh water of the earth, and this proportion is en route to increase to 70% in the next half-century. 1) Precipitation Rainforests release water vapor by transpiration through leaves and evaporation (evapotranspiration, or water lost through the pores in leaves and evaporated by heat). 2) Water regulation The movement of water into rivers and other waterways is modulated by forest vegetation. ExamTime - Changing the way you learn Global risks: Pool knowledge to stem losses from disasters Turjoy Chowdhury/Nurphoto/Corbis This year's deadly earthquakes in Nepal killed more than 8,000 people and reduced thousands of buildings to rubble. In April and May, two massive earthquakes in Nepal killed more than 8,400 people, injured 20,000 and reduced 300,000 houses to rubble. In March, Cyclone Pam destroyed homes, schools, infrastructure and livelihoods on the Pacific island of Vanuatu, affecting half the population, including 82,000 children. The number and severity of disasters is increasing (see 'Catastrophic rise'). Improved disaster-risk management and resilience is essential for sustainable societies1. Hazard preparation: Three lessons yet to be learned Build well to save life and property. Invest in pre-disaster mitigation. Be prepared. Sadly, hazard mitigation is not a vote-winner. In March, governments met under the auspices of the United Nations in Sendai, Japan, to negotiate an international agreement to reverse the rising trend of disaster losses. Splintered approach

10 Useful History and Geography Apps Below are some good iPad apps for History and Geography teachers. I am sharing them with you on the occasion of the start of a new school year. I invite you to have a look and share with us if you have other titles to add to the list. If you want more resources for back to school I recommend that you check this resource section. World Atlas HD:iPad users can download this stunning, popular digital atlas by the National Geographic Society and educate themselves about the planet’s physical and cultural properties and relationships. Earth - The world's most deadly volcanoes Last August, in southern Iceland, the flanks of the volcano Bardarbunga ripped open and fountains of lava spouted skyward. Molten rock oozed downhill making its way toward the sea. The eruption has now come to an end but the volcano continues to pump gases into the atmosphere. Scientists are still monitoring it closely. “Bardarbunga has really, for the first time, seriously showed its power,” says Pall Einarsson, a geophysicist at the University of Iceland. Laki’s eruption started in 1783 and, for eight long months, it spewed lava and noxious gases. But Laki’s devastation spread well beyond the ‘island of fire and ice.’ Although the ultimate death toll from Laki might be near impossible to estimate, the volcano definitely earns its place amongst the world’s deadliest. None of these volcanoes wielded their force in quite the same way, and nearly all took their victims by surprise. Economists at Saxo Bank don’t think so. Forces of Fire and Flood Small but Deadly What’s simmering?

Build A Newspaper | Quick and Easy Newspaper Templates Most dangerous job in the world: Incredible footage of men working on top of volcanos | Weird This incredible footage shows men working on a super volcanic mountain range in East Java, Indonesia. The workers, many of whom aren't expected to live past 50, breathe highly noxious gases which come out of the Kawah Ijen Volcano without masks, carrying loads of up to 70kg on their backs from a quarry. Many work shirtless and have huge growths on their backs from the heavy loads. Photographer Brad Ambrose captured the pictures along with his pal Geoff Mackley, while trekking through Indonesia. The 38-year-old photographer said: "It would be one of the more dangerous jobs in the world – not just because of the fall risks, but because of the gases the miners work in. "The majority are working in there with no masks to filter out the deadly gases. "Even though we each used a gas filter set, at some stages we could still taste the gas." The photographers from New Zealand travelled from midnight to try and get pictures of the sulphur fires before sunrise.

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