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Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0
This publication has been funded in part with Federal funds from the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) under contract number ED05CO0039. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. Additional information about participation in the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Working Group (WCAG WG) can be found on the Working Group home page. Other previously active WCAG WG participants and other contributors to WCAG 2.0

http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/

Related:  Online learning tools and resourcesAccessibility and Universal Design for LearningNew Structural ElementsDesign Concepts

Getting Started with Articulate Storyline To help you get started using Articulate Storyline we created a series of beginner tutorials that will walk you through creating your first slide and then using many of the most common features. They'll help you get up and running quickly. They're not exhaustive tutorials, but they do cover the basics. Each tutorial includes a video screencasts and some practice activities for you to follow along. If you want more specific detail, then visit the product tutorials in panel on the right. If you have a question, feel free to jump into the community forums and ask. Simulation of Vision Conditions Vision simulation is one way to understand how the world is experienced by someone with a visual impairment. This section has links to photographs, activities, and instructions for creating your own vision simulators. Below is a list of topics you'll find in this section. Click on a title to jump to a specific topic: Images and Simulations of Eye Disorders

The Paciello Group – Your Accessibility Partner (WCAG 2.0/508 audits, VPAT, usability and accessible user experience) Latest Update: The state of hidden content support in 2016 As a developer and also a consultant advising developers on how to develop accessible content, it is important to have and provide up to date and practical knowledge about robust development techniques. A recent question on Stack Overflow got me thinking: What is the best method for hiding content for all users? For hiding content for some users? The standard technique for hiding content for all users has been the use CSS display:none. Now, both ARIA and HTML5 also provide a semantic indication of content state that indicates content is hidden or should not be available to users:

How to Meet WCAG 2.0 This web page can be used as a checklist for WCAG 2.0. It provides: All of the requirements (called "success criteria") from Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0Techniques to meet the requirements, which are linked to pages with descriptions, code examples, browser and assistive technology support notes, and tests.Failures to avoid, which are linked to pages with descriptions, examples, and tests."

Making screencasts: The pedagogical framework - Casting Out Nines Last week I was honored to be part of the MOOC on An Introduction to Evidence-Based Undergraduate STEM Teaching that’s currently being offered by Vanderbilt University through Coursera. Derek Bruff (who did a 4+1 interview for us last year) is one of the lead instructors of the MOOC, and he asked me to contribute three videos about my use of screencasting and lecture as part of the flipped classroom. Those videos went out on the MOOC last week, and now that the Courserians have had a week with them, I’m going to share them with you as well. I made three of these videos. The first one, below, has to do with my approach to lecture and the pedagogical framework for screencasting as part of a flipped-instruction model.

Accessible Media Player Resources Note: Last updated February 2nd, 2016. If you have a suggested link leave a comment and I’ll add it. Below are a few resources around media player accessibility. <main> - HTML (HyperText Markup Language) Summary The HTML <main> element represents the main content of the <body> of a document or application. The main content area consists of content that is directly related to, or expands upon the central topic of a document or the central functionality of an application.

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 This publication has been funded in part with Federal funds from the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) under contract number ED05CO0039. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. 11 Good Digital Storytelling Resources Digital storytelling comes in many forms. Digital storytelling could refer to creating podcasts, creating videos, or creating multimedia ebooks to name of few of its forms. If you're considering developing your first digital storytelling project for your class, here some resources that can help you get started.Ebooks and web references for digital storytelling. One of the best people I know for advice about digital storytelling is Silvia Tolisano.

Testing HTML for Section 508 Compliance Alternatives must be provided for all media content (audio or video) and synchronized alternatives must be provided for content that contains both video and audio (multimedia). Synchronized alternatives, such as the display of text for audio at the same time it is spoken, is important so users will derive the full meaning of the content. Why are synchronized captions important? Watch a foreign film that’s been closed-captioned, and you’ve experienced the film as it was meant to be experienced. HTML/Usage/Headings - W3C Wiki Use h1 to h6 to identify document structure Using only h1 elements in a HTML document results in a flat document outline as heading element semantics are conveyed to users as per the numeric in the heading element tag name. Include a heading to identify article and section elements As a general rule, include a heading (h1-h6) as a child of each section and article element.

The Common Gateway Interface The Common Gateway Interface, or CGI, is a standard for external gateway programs to interface with information servers such as HTTP servers. The current version is CGI/1.1. CGI Documentation If you have no idea what CGI is, you should read this introduction.

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