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Ibogaine

Ibogaine
Ibogaine is a naturally occurring psychoactive substance found in plants in the Apocynaceae family such as Tabernanthe iboga, Voacanga africana and Tabernaemontana undulata. A psychedelic with dissociative properties, the substance is banned in some countries; in other countries it is used by proponents of psychedelic therapy to treat addiction to methadone, heroin, alcohol, cocaine, methamphetamine, anabolic steroids, and other drugs. Ibogaine is also used to treat depression and post traumatic stress disorder. Derivatives of ibogaine that lack the substance's psychedelic properties are under development.[1] Ibogaine-containing preparations are used for medicinal and ritual purposes within African spiritual traditions of the Bwiti, who claim to have learned it from the Pygmy peoples. Although it was first commonly advertised as having anti-addictive properties in 1962 by Howard Lotsof, its western use predates that by at least a century. History[edit] Synthesis[edit] Psychotherapy[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibogaine

Related:  Psychoactive AlkaloidsPsychopharmacologyunsorted interestingLiterature/to read

Yuremamine Yuremamine is a phytoindole alkaloid which was isolated and identified from the bark of Mimosa tenuiflora in 2005.[1] As a pure compound, yuremamine is a purple amorphous solid. It represents an entirely new family of indole derivatives. Jump up ^ Vepsäläinen, J. J.; Auriola, S.; Tukiainen, M.; Ropponen, N. & Callaway, J. (2005). Manual for Ibogaine Therapy "Regarding the manual I would disagree with some of the exclusion criteria," says one author. "By excluding patients that are depressed or bipolar you exclude a sizable portion of the addict population. Because ibogaine's metabolites have been shown to have an antidepressant effect it would probably help these patients. Proper treatment for psychiatric conditions can be administered afterward.

Biopresence – Human DNA Trees Imagine a graveyard without tombstones, instead there are growing trees that contain genetic material of the deceased people burried there. Biopresence creates Human DNA trees by transcoding the essence of a human being within the DNA of a tree in order to create “Living Memorials” or “Transgenic Tombstones”. Biopresence uses the DNA Manifold algorithm, which allows for the transcoding and entwinement of human and tree DNAs.

Red Book (Jung) The Red Book, also known as Liber Novus (Latin for New Book), is a 205-page manuscript written and illustrated by Swiss psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung between approximately 1914 and 1930, prepared for publication by The Philemon Foundation and published by W. W. Norton & Co. on October 7, 2009. Voacangine Voacangine (12-methoxyibogamine-18-carboxylic acid methyl ester) is an alkaloid found predominantly in the rootbark of the Voacanga africana tree, as well as in other plants such as Tabernanthe iboga, Tabernaemontana africana, Trachelospermum jasminoides and Ervatamia yunnanensis.[2][3][4][5] It is an iboga alkaloid which commonly serves as a precursor for the semi-synthesis of ibogaine.[6] It has also been demonstrated in animals to have similar anti-addictive properties to ibogaine itself.[7] See also[edit] References[edit] Jump up ^ "Compound Report Card CHEMBL182120 - Voacangine". ChEMBL. Jump up ^ Patel, M.

Muscimol Muscimol (agarin, pantherine) is the major psychoactive alkaloid present in many mushrooms of the Amanita genus. Muscimol is a potent, selective agonist for the GABAA receptors and displays sedative-hypnotic effects. Chemistry[edit] Muscimol is the psychoactive compound responsible for the effects of Amanita muscaria intoxication. Ibotenic acid, a neurotoxic secondary metabolite of Amanita muscaria, serves as a prodrug to muscimol when the mushroom is ingested or dried, converting to muscimol via decarboxylation. Biology[edit]

The Ibogaine Story "I have seen the best minds of my genertion, starving, hysterical, naked, Dragging themselves through negro streets at dawn, looking for an angry fix..." --Allen Ginsberg, the opening lines, HOWL; 1954 "What we're looking for is something wecan spray over theSoviet trenches, and they'll march out whistling 'Yankee Doodle Dandy'." -- Ascribed to a CIA advisor, Defense Department, Lucky fruits A Chinese farmer, Gao Xianzhang, has invented baby-shaped buddha pears and he is planning to export his idea. The produce became a success in his local province since people seem to think the pear gives them good luck. He has created a series of 10,000 this season and plans to take the fruits of his labour to the UK and Europe. Gao spent six years perfecting the intricate baby-shaped pears, carefully crafting each one which grows inside an individual mould. Based on his experience I can imagine a whole new range of moulded pears appearing from China. Luckily for Gao, he should have few problems getting his quirky shaped fruits past EU officials.

New Moon Astrology by Jan Spiller New Moon AstrologyFrom "New Moon Astrology - Using New Moon Power Days to Change and Revitalize Your Life" by Jan SpillerPosted by: DailyOM Rules of the Road Timing This is a planet where we reap what we sow. Harmine Harmine is a fluorescent harmala alkaloid belonging to the beta-carboline family of compounds. It occurs in a number of different plants, most notably the Middle Eastern plant harmal or Syrian rue (Peganum harmala) and the South American vine Banisteriopsis caapi (also known as "yage" or "ayahuasca"). Harmine reversibly inhibits monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A), an enzyme which breaks down monoamines, making it a RIMA. Harmine selectively binds to MAO-A but does not inhibit the variant MAO-B.[5] Uses[edit] Monoamines include neurotransmitters (serotonin, dopamine), hormones (melatonin, epinephrine, norepinephrine) and psychedelic drugs (psilocybin, DMT and mescaline).

Aporphine Aporphine is one of a class of quinoline alkaloids. Many different relatives of this compound have been purified from plants.[1] One commonly used aporphine derivative is apomorphine, although it does not occur naturally. Aporphine is a 5-HT1a partial agonist with a ki of 80nM and a 5-HT7 antagonist with a ki of 88nM.[2] Aporphine is a Dopamine D1 antagonist with a ki of 717nM[3] and a dopamine D2 antagonist with a ki of 527nM.[4] Aporphine and its related alkaloids bulbocapnine, boldine, glaucine and corytuberine are antipsychotic, exert naloxone-reversible antinociceptive activity and with the exception of corytuberine are anticonvulsant.[5] Some derivatives of aporphine such as S(+)-N-propylnorapomorphine have potential as low side effect profile antipsychotics.

Mescaline Mescaline or 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenethylamine is a naturally occurring psychedelic alkaloid of the phenethylamine class, known for its hallucinogenic effects similar to those of LSD and psilocybin. It shares strong structural similarities with the catecholamine dopamine. It occurs naturally in the peyote cactus (Lophophora williamsii),[1] the San Pedro cactus[2] (Echinopsis pachanoi) and in the Peruvian torch (Echinopsis peruviana), and as well in a number of other members of the Cactaceae plant family. It is also found in small amounts in certain members of the Fabaceae (bean) family, including Acacia berlandieri.[3]

Edible Implants Why turn to implants when the female body can do it by itself? Dutch designer Femke Mosch came up with the idea of making edible implants that stimulate breast growth from within. Jesse Bransford: Building the Fourth Pyramid, an Occult Art Installation at Galveston « Observatory Date: Thursday, July 11th Time: 8pm Admission: $10 Presented by: Phantasmaphile In 2012, the artist and mage, Jesse Bransford, was invited to create an installation for the respected Galveston Artist Residency in Texas. The result was his room of visual spellcraft, which he named “THE FOURTH PYRAMID.” In GAR’s words: “For our first exhibition of 2013, marking our one-year anniversary on this island, GAR has teamed up with artist Jesse Bransford to bring about the existence of THE FOURTH PYRAMID. If ever there were an artist who could make transformative magic a reality it would be Bransford.

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