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IEEE 802.11

IEEE 802.11
IEEE 802.11 is a set of media access control (MAC) and physical layer (PHY) specifications for implementing wireless local area network (WLAN) computer communication in the 2.4, 3.6, 5 and 60 GHz frequency bands. They are created and maintained by the IEEE LAN/MAN Standards Committee (IEEE 802). The base version of the standard was released in 1997 and has had subsequent amendments. The standard and amendments provide the basis for wireless network products using the Wi-Fi brand. While each amendment is officially revoked when it is incorporated in the latest version of the standard, the corporate world tends to market to the revisions because they concisely denote capabilities of their products. As a result, in the market place, each revision tends to become its own standard. The LinksysWRT54G contains a router with an 802.11b/g radio and two antennae General description[edit] History[edit] 802.11 technology has its origins in a 1985 ruling by the U.S. Protocol[edit] 802.11b[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11

High-speed multimedia radio Basics[edit] Capabilities[edit] HSMM can support most of the traffic that the Internet currently does, including video chat, voice, instant messaging, the Web (HTTP), file transfer (FTP), and forums. Wi-Fi Wi-Fi, also spelled Wifi or WiFi, is a technology that allows an electronic device to exchange data or connect to the internet wirelessly using 2.4 GHz UHF and 5 GHz SHF radio waves. The name is a trademark name, and was stated to be a play on the audiophile term Hi-Fi. The Wi-Fi Alliance defines Wi-Fi as any "wireless local area network (WLAN) products that are based on the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers' (IEEE) 802.11 standards".[1] However, since most modern WLANs are based on these standards, the term "Wi-Fi" is used in general English as a synonym for "WLAN". Only Wi-Fi products that complete Wi-Fi Alliance interoperability certification testing successfully may use the "Wi-Fi CERTIFIED" trademark. Depiction of a device sending information wirelessly to another device, both connected to the local network, in order to print a document.

IEEE 802.10 IEEE 802.10 is a former standard for security functions that could be used in both local area networks and metropolitan area networks based on IEEE 802 protocols. 802.10 specifies security association management and key management, as well as access control, data confidentiality and data integrity. The IEEE 802.10 standards were withdrawn in January 2004 and this working group of the IEEE 802 is not currently active. Security for wireless networks was standardized in 802.11i. The Cisco Inter-Switch Link (ISL) protocol for supporting VLANs on Ethernet and similar LAN technologies was based on IEEE 802.10; in this application 802.10 has largely been replaced by IEEE 802.1Q. The standard being developed has 8 parts:

Hacking Techniques in Wireless Networks Prabhaker Mateti Department of Computer Science and EngineeringWright State UniversityDayton, Ohio 45435-0001 This article is scheduled to appear in “The Handbook of Information Security”, Hossein Bidgoli (Editor-in-Chief), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2005. 1. Introduction. 2

Firewall (computing) An illustration of where a firewall would be located in a network. In computing, a firewall is a software or hardware-based network security system that controls the incoming and outgoing network traffic by analyzing the data packets and determining whether they should be allowed through or not, based on applied rule set. A firewall establishes a barrier between a trusted, secure internal network and another network (e.g., the Internet) that is not assumed to be secure and trusted.[1] Firewall technology emerged in the late 1980s when the Internet was a fairly new technology in terms of its global use and connectivity. IEEE 802.9 The 802.9 Working Group of the IEEE 802 networking committee developed standards for integrated voice and data access over existing Category 3 twisted-pair network cable installations. Its major standard was usually known as isoEthernet. There was some vendor support for isoEthernet, but it lost in the marketplace due to the rapid adoption of Fast Ethernet and the working group was disbanded.

Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python - Chapters Chapter 1 Read online: Chapter 1 - Installing Python Videos: Chapter 2 Read online: Chapter 2 - The Interactive Shell Chapter 3 Proxy server Communication between two computers (shown in grey) connected through a third computer (shown in red) acting as a proxy. Note that Bob doesn't know whom the information is going to, which is why proxies can be used to protect privacy. Types of proxy[edit] A proxy server may reside on the user's local computer, or at various points between the user's computer and destination servers on the Internet. Forward proxies[edit] IEEE 802.6 IEEE 802.6 is a standard governed by the ANSI for Metropolitan Area Networks (MAN). It is an improvement of an older standard (also created by ANSI) which used the Fiber distributed data interface (FDDI) network structure. The FDDI-based standard failed due to its expensive implementation and lack of compatibility with current LAN standards. The IEEE 802.6 standard uses the Distributed Queue Dual Bus (DQDB) network form. This form supports 150 Mbit/s transfer rates. It consists of two unconnected unidirectional buses.

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