background preloader

Eric Mazur on new interactive teaching techniques

Eric Mazur on new interactive teaching techniques
In 1990, after seven years of teaching at Harvard, Eric Mazur, now Balkanski professor of physics and applied physics, was delivering clear, polished lectures and demonstrations and getting high student evaluations for his introductory Physics 11 course, populated mainly by premed and engineering students who were successfully solving complicated problems. Then he discovered that his success as a teacher “was a complete illusion, a house of cards.” The epiphany came via an article in the American Journal of Physics by Arizona State professor David Hestenes. He had devised a very simple test, couched in everyday language, to check students’ understanding of one of the most fundamental concepts of physics—force—and had administered it to thousands of undergraduates in the southwestern United States. Mazur tried the test on his own students. Some soul-searching followed. Serendipity provided the breakthrough he needed. “Here’s what happened,” he continues. “It’s not easy.

http://harvardmagazine.com/2012/03/twilight-of-the-lecture

Related:  Learning Designaktivno učenje

Peer Instruction Inventor Eric Mazur wins $500,000 Minerva Prize! Eric Mazur, who I had the pleasure of meeting several years ago in his on-campus office, won the Minerva Prize, which is dedicated to rewarding "extraordinary innovation" in teaching. Mazur, a professor of physics at Harvard University, developed the peer instruction method out of frustration with his students’ erroneous conceptions of physics. Too many of them utilized naïve mental models about the physical world in thinking about physics.

What is Interactive Teaching The first thing to realize about interactive teaching is that it is NOT something new or mysterious. If you are a teacher and you ask questions in class, assign and check homework, or hold class or group discussions, then you already teach interactively. Basically then (in my book), interactive teaching is just giving students something to do, getting back what they have done, and then assimilating it yourself, so that you can decide what would be best to do next. But, almost all teachers do these things, so is there more to it?

Top 5 Unexpected Apps for STEM Education - StratoStar STEM Education Blog In today’s world, we use apps for everything from managing our bank accounts to expressing our thoughts via tweets, so why not use them for our STEM education projects? StratoStar has compiled a list of our top 5 favorite apps will make tracking, solving equations, and creating reports simpler. 1. Design for Adult Learning, Teaching and Learning Theory, Feedback Design for adult learning Ideally, the design of a course should allow students to customize the experience to meet their goals and complement their personal learning styles. Leonard and DeLacey draw two observations from an Adult Learning Workshop [*] held at Harvard Business School that are useful to keep in mind when designing enhanced, blended or fully-online courses: students who already know the power of a classroom experience will not easily abandon that model for something new; because humans have "certain, predictable preferences and capabilities in learning," some principles of learning span different academic methods.

5 Examples of Interactive Teaching Styles Teaching involves an opened-minded plan for helping students meet and exceed educational goals. Teaching styles may differ from teacher to teacher, class to class and school to school. Yet every teaching objective must include a structured but flexible process for student advancement.

Forgotten Knowledge: How Memory Works, and to Improve Yours (Infographic) Just in case you forgot, our memories are an integral part of our lives and experiences, and enrich our existence. They let us remember “the good old days,” the incredible times spent with family and friends, and enjoy special moments over and over. And while we may think of our best memories, like a first date or a game winning shot, as a single event, they are actually complex constructions of multiple memories, strung together. But memories aren’t forever.

Center for Teaching and Learning Active learning requires students to participate in class, as opposed to sitting and listening quietly. Strategies include, but are not limited to, brief question-and-answer sessions, discussion integrated into the lecture, impromptu writing assignments, hands-on activities and experiential learning events. As you think of integrating active learning strategies into your course, consider ways to set clear expectations, design effective evaluation strategies and provide helpful feedback. “Start classes with a puzzle to be solved or a mystery to be understood. Behind all of the window-dressing, this is what we are really doing when we create strong active learning modules.”Ben Wiggins, Course Coordinator, Biology Bloom's Digital Taxonomy This is the introduction to Bloom's Digital Taxonomy. The different taxonomical levels can be viewed individually via the navigation bar or below this introduction as embedded pages. This is an update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy which attempts to account for the new behaviours and actions emerging as technology advances and becomes more ubiquitous. Bloom's Revised Taxonomy describes many traditional classroom practices, behaviours and actions, but does not account for the new processes and actions associated with Web 2.0 technologies, infowhelm (the exponential growth in information), increasing ubiquitous personal technologies or cloud computing.Bloom's Digital Taxonomy isn't about the tools or technologies rather it is about using these to facilitate learning. Outcomes on rubrics are measured by competence of use and most importantly the quality of the process or product. For example.

Interactive Learning - Stanford Medicine Interactive Learning Initiatives What does this mean for faculty and students? The boundaries between teacher and student become less defined in the context of interactive learning. Faculty and other educators are challenged to transition from being “the sage on stage” to the “guide on side,” while students are challenged to participate more actively in their education. View FAQ » Medical education is at a tipping point of a major transformation. A number of factors -- including a greater understanding of how people learn -- are focusing this shift on the pedagogy of interactive learning. Why Is the Research on Learning Styles Still Being Dismissed by Some Learning Leaders and Practitioners? I have been battling the notion of "designing instruction for learning styles" in my own quixotic fashion for a couple of decades now. In my attempt to be a good steward of my clients' shareholders' equity I wished to help them avoid faddish instructional design practices that have been disproven by empirical research. I first learned back in the 1980s at NSPI (now ISPI) conferences that while self-reported learning style preferences do exist, that designing instruction to accommodate them has no basis. When I posted yet again on this topic on my blog a couple of months ago and then sent a Tweet out about it—Jane Bozarth, EIC of this magazine, invited me to publish an article. I accepted and decided to reach out to the usual suspects, those in my professional crowd who know the research, for their inputs. As I am but a practitioner attempting to follow what I have learned over the years about the research, I am not steeped in that research and able to cite it, they can.

Related: