background preloader

Fantastic Fungi: The Forbidden Fruit

Fantastic Fungi: The Forbidden Fruit

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDkR2HIlEbc

Related:  Earth's Flora

World Flora Online The New York Botanical Garden (NYBG) is one of four prominent international botanical organizations leading the effort to forge the WFO, along with the Missouri Botanical Garden, the Royal Botanic Gardens-Kew, and the Royal Botanic Gardens-Edinburgh. An additional 30 research institutions from many of the world's most biologically diverse countries, including Brazil, China, Colombia, India, Malaysia, Mexico, Russia, and Thailand, have also committed to contributing content as primary partners. Thanks to generous funding from Google and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, NYBG now has the resources to begin large-scale digital capture of it's plant research holdings, beginning with the extensive Flora Neotropica monographs series, published by the NYBG Press since 1967. These 110 volumes constitute the cumulative wealth of scientific knowledge for an estimated 8,500 of the world's plant species, and are now being made freely-available for the very first time!

Meet The World's Largest Living Organism When you think of the biggest organisms on Earth, the blue whale probably springs to mind first. After all, these gargantuan beasts are up to 30 meters long (100 feet) and can weigh upward of 180 tons, meaning they’re probably bigger than even the largest dinosaurs. But it turns out that the world record holder for the largest living organism on Earth is something much less impressive to look at, but size wise it makes even the mighty blue whale seem puny; it’s a fungus. More specifically, the contender for the world’s largest known organism is a honey fungus living in the Blue Mountains of Oregon.

How plants decide that it is time to flower When spring is approaching, how do plants decide that it is time to flower? A team of plant scientists led by KWAK June M. at the Center for Plant Aging Research, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) unravelled a new mechanism to explain this seemingly easy, but actually complicated question. Their research was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on November 11, 2016. While some animals hibernate, seek refuge or fly to warmer climates during the coldest months of the year, plants are unable to move freely, therefore try to overcome environmental stresses by timing their physiological processes. And for this, epigenetics comes to hand. "Plants that bloom too early risk unsuccessfully reproducing.

encyclopedia of spices Spice Advice – how to make the most of spices, which spices to use with particular foods, when to add them, grinding, storage and more. Herbs and Spices Fight Disease — Most of us look at spices as a way to perk up the plate but are you aware of their potential to fight disease? Look here for some recent findings. All about Vanilla – and then some… history, curing, varieties, vanilla extract, essence, powder – even vanilla salt. How to cook with vanilla. including top 10 vanilla recipes! Cooking with Thyme – Getting the most of thyme in your cooking – including varieties of thyme, preparation, infusions, fresh vs. dried and many suggested uses for cooking with thyme.

Flightradar24.com - Live flight tracker! In order to save data consumption Flightradar24 web page times out after 30 minutes. Please reload the web page to get another 30 minutes. or get a Flightradar24 Premium subscription and Flightradar24.com will not time-out again! Plants perform molecular maths Nigel Cattlin/Getty As if making food from light were not impressive enough, it may be time to add another advanced skill to the botanical repertoire: the ability to perform — at least at the molecular level — arithmetic division. Computer-generated models published in the journal eLife illustrate how plants might use molecular mathematics to regulate the rate at which they devour starch reserves to provide energy throughout the night, when energy from the Sun is off the menu1.

Green Superfood From Moringa Tree Can Be Used to Prevent and Treat Over 300 Diseases The superfood known as moringa (from the moringa tree) contains several thousand times more of the powerful anti-aging nutrient zeatin than any other known plant — and that it also has 2 compounds that prevent cancer and stop tumor growth. The moringa is a genus of trees indigenous to Southern India and Northern Africa. It is a short, slender, deciduous, perennial tree that grows about 30 feet tall.

Plants 'do maths' to control overnight food supplies Plants have a built-in capacity to do maths, which helps them regulate food reserves at night, research suggests. UK scientists say they were "amazed" to find an example of such a sophisticated arithmetic calculation in biology. Mathematical models show that the amount of starch consumed overnight is calculated by division in a process involving leaf chemicals, a John Innes Centre team reports in e-Life journal. Birds may use similar methods to preserve fat levels during migration. The scientists studied the plant Arabidopsis, which is regarded as a model plant for experiments.

The Best Home Remedies For Sinus Infection I was talking to my friend the other day, who complained of yet another sinus infection. Runny nose, facial pain, difficulties breathing, headaches and fatigue were marking her days as of late. Why do I get them? she pondered. Ancient plants reawaken: Plants exposed by retreating glaciers regrowing after centuries entombed under ice When University of Alberta researcher Catherine La Farge threads her way through the recently exposed terrain left behind by retreating glaciers, she looks at the ancient plant remains a lot closer than most. Now, her careful scrutiny has revealed a startling reawakening of long-dormant plants known as bryophytes. La Farge, a researcher in the Faculty of Science, and director and curator of the Cryptogamic Herbarium at the University of Alberta, has overturned a long-held assumption that all of the plant remains exposed by retreating polar glaciers are dead. Previously, any new growth of plants close to the glacier margin was considered the result of rapid colonization by modern plants surrounding the glacier.

Related: