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Android (operating system)

Android (operating system)
Android is an operating system based on the Linux kernel,[12] and designed primarily for touchscreen mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet computers. Initially developed by Android, Inc., which Google backed financially and later bought in 2005,[13] Android was unveiled in 2007 along with the founding of the Open Handset Alliance—​a consortium of hardware, software, and telecommunication companies devoted to advancing open standards for mobile devices.[14] The first publicly available smartphone running Android, the HTC Dream, was released on October 22, 2008.[15] The user interface of Android is based on direct manipulation, using touch inputs that loosely correspond to real-world actions, like swiping, tapping, pinching, and reverse pinching to manipulate on-screen objects. History Features Interface Present along the top of the screen is a status bar, showing information about the device and its connectivity. Applications Memory management Hardware

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Android_(operating_system)

Related:  Android DevSmart Phones MobileTechnology3distributions (Mobile LInux)software general

What is Android? Android powers hundreds of millions of mobile devices in more than 190 countries around the world. It's the largest installed base of any mobile platform and growing fast—every day another million users power up their Android devices for the first time and start looking for apps, games, and other digital content. Android gives you a world-class platform for creating apps and games for Android users everywhere, as well as an open marketplace for distributing to them instantly. Android growth in device activations

Nexus One The device was sold SIM unlocked and not restricted to use on a single network provider. Google offered T-Mobile US and AT&T versions of the phone online in the United States before closing the online store in July 2010. A version for use on Vodafone (European) networks was announced on April 26, 2010, available in the UK on April 30, 2010.[15] On March 16, 2010, the Nexus One device became available on the Google web store for sale in Canada for use with most Canadian carriers.[16] In May 2010 Google announced the closing of the web store, with the intention to distribute the phone through partners around the world.[17]

ASIMO Development history[edit] P3 model (left) compared to ASIMO Honda began developing humanoid robots in the 1980s, including several prototypes that preceded ASIMO. It was the company's goal to create a walking robot which could not only adapt and interact in human situations, but also improve the quality of life. Replicant (operating system) An example of phone information in Replicant, including a brief hardware description The software that was in charge of handling the communication with the modem (which is called Radio Interface Layer – RIL) was then replaced by free code, thus making the telephony part usable. A library handling the GPS was then adapted from free code that was originally written for another phone and permitted the HTC Dream to have GPS working with Replicant.[13] Early versions of Replicant were based on the Android Open Source Project code, while versions 2.2 (April 2011) and later use CyanogenMod as their base, in order to make supporting more devices easier.[14][15]

Dalvik (software) Programs for Android are commonly written in Java and compiled to bytecode for the Java virtual machine, which is then translated to Dalvik bytecode and stored in .dex (Dalvik EXecutable) and .odex (Optimized Dalvik EXecutable) files; related terms odex and de-odex are associated with respective bytecode conversions. The compact Dalvik Executable format is designed for systems that are constrained in terms of memory and processor speed. A comparison of Dalvik and ART architectures Unlike Java VMs, which are stack machines, the Dalvik VM uses a register-based architecture that requires fewer, typically more complex, virtual machine instructions. Dalvik programs are written in Java using the Android application programming interface (API), compiled to Java bytecode, and converted to Dalvik instructions as necessary.

How to Choose the Right Android ROM for You In 2012, the average American consumed 13.6 hours of media each day. By 2015, that number is expected to rise to 15.5. These figures include media multitasking, e.g., listening to music while checking your email, so that it's possible to consume more than one hour of media within a 60-minute period. Shockingly,… » 8/14/14 12:01pm Yesterday 12:01pm List of Android devices Google announced that in Q3 2011, the total number of Android activations had surpassed 190 million, which was a significant increase from 135 million the previous quarter. The increase was boosted by sales of Android smartphones at lower prices from Chinese and Indian manufacturers.[2] As of 3 September 2013, there have been 1 billion Android devices activated.[3] Officially released[edit] The following are lists of devices that have been officially released with Google's Android operating system installed. Multiple names for the same device are entered in the same row where applicable.

MicroSD Secure Digital (SD) is a non-volatile memory card format for use in portable devices, such as mobile phones, digital cameras, GPS navigation devices, and tablet computers. The Secure Digital standard was introduced in 1999 as an evolutionary improvement over MultiMediaCards (MMC). The Secure Digital standard is maintained by the SD Card Association (SDA). webOS webOS also known as LG webOS, Open webOS or HP webOS, is a Linux kernel-based operating system for smart TVs,[1] and formerly a mobile operating system.[2] Initially developed by Palm, which was acquired by Hewlett-Packard, the operating system was later sold to LG Electronics. Through all iterations of the operating system (Palm, HP and now LG) the official name has been consistently stylized as webOS (lowercase 'w').[3][note 1] Palm launched WebOS in January 2009, then called Palm WebOS. Various versions of WebOS have been featured on several devices, including Pre, Pixi, and Veer phones and the HP TouchPad tablet. The latest version, 3.0.5, was released on January 12, 2012. After abandoning the TouchPad and the proposed sale of the HP Personal Systems Group, HP made the platform open source, and it became Open WebOS.

Representational state transfer Representational State Transfer (REST) is a software architecture style consisting of guidelines and best practices for creating scalable web services.[1][2] REST is a coordinated set of constraints applied to the design of components in a distributed hypermedia system that can lead to a more performant and maintainable architecture.[3] REST has gained widespread acceptance across the Web[citation needed] as a simpler alternative to SOAP and WSDL-based Web services. RESTful systems typically, but not always, communicate over the Hypertext Transfer Protocol with the same HTTP verbs (GET, POST, PUT, DELETE, etc.) used by web browsers to retrieve web pages and send data to remote servers.[3] The REST architectural style was developed by W3C Technical Architecture Group (TAG) in parallel with HTTP 1.1, based on the existing design of HTTP 1.0.[4] The World Wide Web represents the largest implementation of a system conforming to the REST architectural style. Architectural properties[edit]

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