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JLPT Level Checker - Test your Japanese vocabulary, kanji and grammar (Build 20110927030845)

http://www.tanos.co.uk/jlpt/levelcheck/

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Aedict3 Japanese Dictionary FunEasyLearn is the easy and fun new way to learn Japanese - whether you like listening music from other countries, travelling abroad, working for an international company, or chatting with foreign friends. Our app encourages your kids to learn speaking Japanese quickly. Get the FREE vocabulary app right now! Fun* Select from 7 fun games to learn in a uniquely entertaining manner.* Built-in "Spin Categories" feature allows the app to choose a random topic, subtopic and game for you to enhance your learning experience.* "Review Manager" allows you to review all the words you've learned during each game. Easy* No internet connection is required to use the app.* 3 difficulty levels: beginner, intermediate and advanced.* Choose your preferred tuition language from 51 pre-programmed interface languages: Japanese, English, German, French, Turkish, Russian, Korean, Arabic, Thai, Italian, Spanish, etc.

Is the JLPT really worth it? The final countdown to this Sunday’s Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) has begun, but professionals say piling pressure on examinees might do more harm than good at this point. Having said that, recruitment specialists and Japanese language teachers interviewed by The Japan Times stress that passing the N1 or N2 level of the exam is of paramount importance for foreign nationals hoping to land a top job in this country. The JLPT is a biannual testing service organized by the Japan Foundation and Japan Educational Exchanges and Services. It will take place Dec. 1 across the country and in more than 100 cities around the world. The tests are divided into five levels, from N1 through N5, with the N5 being the easiest. “The JLPT is definitely a yardstick for many companies seeking to hire foreign nationals in Japan,” says Yuji Shinohara, president of Daijob.com, one of Japan’s largest multilingual job search engines with 420,000 registered users.

100 top resources to learn Japanese 741 Flares6250116×741 Flares We find ourselves often giving recommendations of products to learn Japanese with, and we thought it’d be useful to compile a list for your reference. We have included a number of our own products, only where we are convinced that they are deserving of their place in the list, and we have included paid and free study resources without discrimination. The list is broken up by category and each item is clearly marked as to what JLPT level it targets. Everything on this list deserves your attention, but resources we’re particularly fond of, the kind we’d use ourselves, are additionally marked with a little star.

Genki Online:Self-study Room GENKI is a highly acclaimed series of integrated resources for learning elementary Japanese through a well-balanced approach to all four language skill areas—speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Used in many Japanese language courses around the world. More The second editions of GENKI Textbook I, Workbook I, and PICTURE CARDS I were released in February 2011 and feature four major revisions. Click the link here for a detailed look at those changes, plus information on the upcoming... More

TextFugu Online Japanese Textbook Teaching reading IS rocket science - Louisa Moats Before you start reading, and before you start writing, you’re going to learn how to pronounce nearly all the “sounds” of the Japanese language. If you can’t pronounce anything, you won’t be able to read or write anything either. If you learn how to pronounce something while you’re learning to read and write it, you’ll run into overload. By learning pronunciation first (without knowing how to read or write anything) you’re essentially breaking the process up into smaller pieces and ultimately saving yourself a lot of time. In order to learn the pronunciation, though, we’re going to use hiragana. How to Learn Kanji, in 10 Steps - Japanese Rule of 7 I don’t go to a lot of cocktail parties. But somehow when I do, I always meet people studying Japanese. Maybe it’s just me. Or more precisely, people who’ll eventually stop studying, only they don’t know it yet. Here’s how the conversation goes: “Ken!

Japanese Lessons with Maggie » Super Basic Words Part 1 (Twitter lesson review) 「塵も積もれば山となる!」 = Chiri mo tsumore ba yama to naru. = Many drops make a shower. Hi everyone! Since I had a request to teach one word per day on Twitter in January, I have been tweeting “Super Basic words” every day for 9 weeks. Tumbleweed's Resources for Learning Japanese Okay, here's a familiar scenario... For whatever reason, you've taken up the study of the Japanese language. You've gone through a couple of the beginner's level books, you've run through a couple of basic tutorial programs, you've even taken a couple of classes someplace. Then you decide to try out your new knowledge. You try talking to native speakers, you try to watch an unsubtitled movie or read a magazine.

The EDICT Dictionary File Welcome to the Home Page of the EDICT file within the JMdict/EDICT Project. This page has been written by Jim Breen (hereafter "I" or "me") and is intended as an overview of the file, with links to more detail elsewhere. Background Way back in 1991 I began to experiment with handling Japanese text in computer files, and decided to try writing a dictionary search program in Turbo C under DOS, which used a simple dictionary file contained in the MOKE (Mark's Own Kanji Editor) package. To make this program more useful, I began to expand the file itself.

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