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Observation, Assessment and Planning - Early Years Matters

Observation, Assessment and Planning - Early Years Matters
The EYFS Profile summarises and describes children’s attainment at the end of the EYFS. It is based on on-going observation and assessment in the three prime and four specific areas of learning, and the three learning characteristics, set out below: The prime areas of learning: • communication and language • physical development • personal, social and emotional development The specific areas of learning: • literacy • mathematics • understanding the world • expressive arts and design The learning characteristics: • playing and exploring • active learning • creating and thinking critically A completed EYFS Profile consists of 20 items of information: the attainment of each child is assessed in relation to each of the 17 Early Learning Goals descriptors, (ELGs) together with a short narrative describing the child’s ways of learning expressed in terms of the three characteristics of learning. The primary uses of EYFS Profile data which have informed the development of the Profile are as follows.

https://www.earlyyearsmatters.co.uk/eyfs/a-unique-child/planning/

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