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They Might Be Giants - Put It to the Test - Official video

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Edheads - Activate Your Mind! 10 Incredible Things That Happen Every Second Be a geek and a nerd: Jim Kakalios at Convocation 2009 Roller Coaster Game Welcome to the death defying Funderstanding Roller Coaster! This simulator is designed for people who want to design their own thrilling coaster and educators who want to use a cool activity to simulate the application of physics by using an exciting interactive tool and access to a wonderful reference source. It is your mission to become a roller coaster designer so that you can achieve maximum thrills and chills without crashing or flying off the track (unless that’s how you like your coaster to work!). If you accept this mission you must decide on a number of factors. You are responsible for setting the controls for the height of hill #1, hill #2, the size of the loop, the initial speed of the coaster, its mass, the gravity at work and the amount of friction on the track. This great educational online tool offers an interactive way for kids to play a roller coaster game, and learn while doing it. Finally, some fun online education kids! If you need help, click on the ‘?

Top 10 Ways to Wake-up Students in Class - SimpleK12 The following is a guest post from Michelle Doman, a 7th and 8th grade Language Arts teacher at Brandon Middle School in Wisconsin. Top 10 Ways to Wake-up Students in Class Many people get a little squeamish, wiggly, and offer a scrunched expression when I respond to the question, “What grades do you teach?” I teach middle school, and with heart and honesty, I find great joys (and challenges) in teaching the group referred to as “tweens” and adolescents. So, I invite you into the quirky world of middle school. Here are the Top 10 Ways to Wake-up Students in Class... 10. 9. 8. 7. 6. 5. 4. 3. 2. 1. If anyone has more ideas to capture the wondering, daydreaming, (hormonal) minds of middle school students, I would love to read about them. Related Articles 10 MORE Ways to Wake-up Students in Class About the Author Michelle Doman is a 7th and 8th grade Language Arts teacher at Brandon Middle School in Wisconsin's Rosendale-Brandon School District. P.S.

Teacher Lab and Reading Notebooks In my district, we were fortunate to have a full time Reading Coach that helped K-5 teachers fully implement Reading Workshop this past year. Part of her job was to hold Teacher Labs for K-5 teachers. Teacher Labs allowed groups of teachers to enter another teacher's classroom to observe Reading Workshop. During one of our lab days, I discovered these AWESOME reading notebooks. What do you use for reading notebooks? Galileo Drops the Ball - Virtual Experiment In around 1590 Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) climbed up the Leaning Tower of Pisa and dropped some balls to the ground. Two balls of different masses, but of similar shape and density that were released together hit the ground at the same time. Until then it was commonly believed that heavy things fall faster than light things. Many people still believe this, and casual observation of everyday phenomena often does tend to confirm this view. If you drop a brick and a feather at the same time the brick will probably hit the ground first. Galileo’s discovery is important in understanding how parachutes work. Click on the image to the left to try Galileo’s experiment for yourself. Find out more about Galileo Galilei.

Free Technology for Teachers Setting Expectations for Group Work I know...I know...you have heard me say this a million times. It is important to have groups in science and to have individual jobs while you are working together! So how do you introduce it the first time???? We begin by Introducing our science groups. Each child is assigned a color as you see. We began working as groups by setting expectations. Then we worked on two simple tasks. Why? Get your students into their groups of four and send your Getter 1 to the materials spot to get 6 solo cups and one rubber band tool. Students will need to make a structure that looks like this: Have your Starter create this structure. Then as a team, they will need to move the cups from this structure to a pyramid with three cups on bottom, then two cups then one on top. These guys are showing you how to manipulate the tool and you can also see the finished product at the side. When you are finished, have Getter 2 clean up the materials and return them to the materials spot. What do you think???

Force and Motion Facts Motion makes the world go 'round. Motion makes the moon go 'round too. In fact, motion makes lots of things go. When we think of motion we often think of cars, bicycles, kids running, basketballs bouncing and airplanes flying. But motion is so much more. What is Force? Force is just a fancy word for pushing or pulling. These two forces act at a distance and do not require direct contact between the objects to function. See D4K's site on Gravity. Magnetism produces a force that can either pull opposite ends of two magnets together or push the matching ends apart. Types Of Contact Forces There are 6 kinds of forces which act on objects when they come into contact with one another. Let's investigate how these forces can be seen in our lives. Normal Force A book resting on a table has the force of gravity pulling it toward the Earth. Experiment with this concept by trying one of these paper bridge experiments from ZOOM or Building Big! Applied Force Frictional Force Tension Force Spring Force

We Don't Like "Projects" So I recently quit my job and started my own school with the support of a local media company, the second largest school district in Iowa, and a groundswell of community interest. Our philosophy boils down to a fairly liberal project-based learning environment. As I began the marketing push to enroll students, I uncovered some frankly stunning assumptions that many students have about learning: The word "project" is not a happy word. When I say project-based learning, most students grimace as they imagine prescribed PowerPoints.If a teacher doesn't plan it, it's not learning.If there isn't a test, it wasn't real.Their personal interests cannot inform their learning. Learning is sterile, and the actual usage of the word "learning," to them, is quite different from what a professional might consider learning. I'm not complaining -- in fact, these assumptions are the reason that I struck out on my own in the first place -- but I was flat-out surprised by their ubiquity. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Spaghetti, Marshmallows, and COOPERATION! I facilitated a lesson with 4th graders that involved spaghetti, marshmallows, and cooperation! I divided the class into groups of three or four students. Each group received dry spaghetti noodles and a bowl of marshmallows. I instructed students that they would be making a tower with their group members. I told them that the group who had the highest tower at the end of ten minutes would get a prize from me. After the 10 minutes were up, I asked groups what they thought the point of the activity was. The students really enjoyed this activity. What creative lessons do you facilitate to teach students about cooperation? Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.

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