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They Might Be Giants - Put It to the Test - Official video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kf51FpBuXQ

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Roller Coaster Game Welcome to the death defying Funderstanding Roller Coaster! This simulator is designed for people who want to design their own thrilling coaster and educators who want to use a cool activity to simulate the application of physics by using an exciting interactive tool and access to a wonderful reference source. It is your mission to become a roller coaster designer so that you can achieve maximum thrills and chills without crashing or flying off the track (unless that’s how you like your coaster to work!). If you accept this mission you must decide on a number of factors. You are responsible for setting the controls for the height of hill #1, hill #2, the size of the loop, the initial speed of the coaster, its mass, the gravity at work and the amount of friction on the track. This great educational online tool offers an interactive way for kids to play a roller coaster game, and learn while doing it.

Galileo Drops the Ball - Virtual Experiment In around 1590 Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) climbed up the Leaning Tower of Pisa and dropped some balls to the ground. Two balls of different masses, but of similar shape and density that were released together hit the ground at the same time. Until then it was commonly believed that heavy things fall faster than light things. Many people still believe this, and casual observation of everyday phenomena often does tend to confirm this view. Force and Motion Facts Motion makes the world go 'round. Motion makes the moon go 'round too. In fact, motion makes lots of things go. When we think of motion we often think of cars, bicycles, kids running, basketballs bouncing and airplanes flying. But motion is so much more.

Motion: Forces Forces are a big part of physics. Physicists devote a lot of time to the study of forces that are found everywhere in the universe. The forces could be big, such as the pull of a star on a planet. The forces could also be very small, such as the pull of a nucleus on an electron. Forces are acting everywhere in the universe at all times. If you were a ball sitting on a field and someone kicked you, a force would have acted on you. Amusement Park Physics Design a Roller Coaster Try your hand at designing your own roller coaster. You will be building a conceptual coaster using the physics concepts that are used to design real coasters. You won't need to compute any formulas. You will decide the following - the height of the first hill, the shape of the first hill, the exit path, the height of the second hill, and the loop. When you're done, your coaster will need to pass an inspection for both safety and fun.

Tremors of the Big Bang: First direct evidence of cosmic inflation Almost 14 billion years ago, the universe we inhabit burst into existence in an extraordinary event that initiated the Big Bang. In the first fleeting fraction of a second, the universe expanded exponentially, stretching far beyond the view of our best telescopes. All this, of course, was just theory. Researchers from the BICEP2 collaboration today announced the first direct evidence for this cosmic inflation. Their data also represent the first images of gravitational waves, or ripples in space-time. These waves have been described as the "first tremors of the Big Bang."

Science Gal: Creating Catapults This is another engaging after school activity that we used in our Force and Motion science club. It would be easy to add to your existing curriculum; especially if you teach the FOSS Variables kit. In the Variables Kit, there are four problems for students to explore and test variable - pendulums, penny boats, planes and flippers. Flippers are really catapults that you can change the height of the object's trajectory path by changing the length of the flipper. Another great FREE game from FOSS is the Blasto Game. This goes right along with the idea of changing variables to further your flight. FEI Torilis Arensis Courtesy of Pat Kysar Product: SEMTorilis arvensis is commonly known as Spreading Hedge Parsley. The plants grow up to 3 feet in height with tiny flowers clustered in small flat-topped umbels. T. arvensis fruit (schizocarp) measure 4-6mm and usually hold 2-4 individual seeds (mericarps). The schizocarp is covered with velco-like appendages which attach to clothing and fur allowing them to hitch a ride to new terrain.

10 next-generation science apps for education - eClassroom News These science apps range from visually stunning multimedia to great resources for curious minds Just like technology, science is always changing to reflect progress and information learned. With these 10 next-generation science apps for education, you’ll find an array of apps that not only use HD-quality visual representations, but also integrate the newest requirements in science standards. From an app designed specifically by a tech-savvy science teacher eager to share multimedia lessons on life sciences, to an app that provides Kindergarteners with an introduction to physical science, these apps are some of the most current (and most vetted) for students and teachers interested in exploring the world science opens up, all through mobile technology. This is just a sampling of available science apps. Do you use an app that isn’t on the list?

Seven Free Science Apps for iPads I’m preparing to do a virtual presentation for a small district next month. My hosts asked for a list of some science apps that their middle school and high school students can use. This is part of the list that has free apps. The Bill Nye The Science Guy iPad app is a free iPad app on which students can watch Bill Nye videos, play games, and discover kitchen table science experiments to do at home with their parents.

How to make geometric bubbles Epic Pen Spinning Watch as pen spinners Ian Jenson and 吳宗諺 (PPM) perform some epic pen spinning, complete with a few great slow motion moments that really showcase what’s going on. This short from Taiwan&... Bubble Device #2 Science Fair Project Ideas Are you in the market for some science fair project ideas? Well, hopefully this post will have you covered. These twelve science experiments encourage children to test, tinker with, experiment, hypothesize, and evaluate various properties and phenomena. Most of our favorite science experiments involve everyday, household supplies because they’re easy to come by and relatively safe for children to use. You’ll see that these science fair project ideas use materials like gummy bears, dish soap, food coloring, chocolate syrup, sand, lemons, eggs, celery, oil, Alka Seltzer, vinegar, plastic bags, pencils, salt, cotton balls, seeds, and candy.

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