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Analysis & Opinion

Analysis & Opinion
Never mind Michael Lewis. The most interesting and provocative thing to be written of late about financial innovation in general, and high-frequency trading in particular, comes from Joe Stiglitz. The Nobel prize-winning economist delivered a wonderful and fascinating speech at the Atlanta Fed’s 2014 Financial Markets Conference today; here’s a shorter version of what Stiglitz is saying. Markets can be — and usually are — too active, and too volatile. This is an idea which goes back to Keynes, if not earlier. Stiglitz says that in the specific area of international capital flows, “there is now a broad consensus that unfettered markets are welfare decreasing” — and certainly you won’t get much argument on that front from, say, Iceland, or Malaysia, or even Spain.

http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/

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David Leonhardt - Economix Blog Julian Simon, frustrated by the huge attention that Paul Ehrlich was receiving for his apocalyptic warnings about overpopulation, offered Mr. Ehrlich a bet in 1980. If a selected basket of commodities became more expensive over the coming decade — which would signal scarcity caused by a crowded planet — Mr. Ehrlich, an ecologist, would win the bet. Modern Monetary Theory … alternative economic thinking The Weekend Quiz – March 5-6, 2016 Welcome to The Weekend Quiz, which used to be known as the Saturday Quiz! The quiz tests whether you have been paying attention over the last seven days. See how you go with the following questions. Your results are only known to you and no records are retained.

Eurozone Crisis: In the Eye of the Storm The Eurozone crisis has been in retreat since the introduction of the European Central Bank’s (ECB) three-year long-term refinancing operations (LTROs) in late December 2011. At the European Council Meeting in early March, journalists who cover the crisis fretted that boredom loomed. The current lull does not indicate that the Eurozone is in the clear, but rather it is simply in the eye of the storm, and more drama inevitably awaits. Extend and pretend So far, there are three key mechanisms the troika — the European Commission, International Monetary Fund (IMF) and ECB — has employed to buy time for the Eurozone’s weaker countries to regain competitiveness and return to growth.

Street Sweep - Fortune Finance: Hedge Funds, Markets, Mergers & Acquisitions, Private Equity, Venture Capital, Wall Street, Washington Apparently Bernie Madoff wasn't the only bad apple at Nasdaq. In the latest shining moment for the U.S. stock exchanges, the Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday charged Donald Johnson, a former Nasdaq managing director, with ripping off investors to the tune of $755,000 by insider trading ahead of the release of corporate press releases. Johnson, you will be impressed to learn, was in charge through October 2009 of the Nasdaq's "market intelligence" desk, which is surely a misnomer but seems in any case to have afforded him with a lot of info he used to trade profitably on outfits like United Therapeutics (UTHR).

Real Time Economics China’s GDP growth fell in the first quarter to its slowest pace since September of 2012, slipping to 7.4% on-year growth from 7.7% the in the fourth quarter. The increase was slightly higher than economists’ expectations of a 7.3% gain. Authorities released other data that suggested continuing weakness, but not at a quickening pace. Industrial production grew 8.8% on year in March below expectations of 9% but up from an average 8.6% expansion in January and February, combined to limit distortions from the Lunar New Year holidays.

The RAND Journal of Economics Winter 2014 Volume 45, Issue 4, Pages 675–917 In This Issue Back Issues of the RAND Journal of Economics Individual articles and issues from 2006 to present are available either with a subscription or for a fee from Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. Blog Today is Equal Pay Day, a reminder that women and men are not always compensated at the same rate. While the widely reported statistic that women, on average, earn 77 cents to every man’s dollar has been is a great indicator that women are put in situations every day that for a variety of reasons mean they earn less, it has been criticized for not measuring individuals of similar characteristics, such as age, occupation, education, or experience. To try to get a better understanding of the gender wage gap among specific age groups, and given that many high school and college seniors are on the brink of graduating and entering the labor force, I thought it would be interesting look at the gender wage gap by age and education, to see how women and men fare as they enter today’s unsteady labor market. To close the gender wage gap, women need to see real wage growth faster than their male counterparts. The best type of narrowing occurs when both women and men see real annual wage growth.

The Wealth Report One of the most famous and funny Monty Python skits is the “Four Yorkshiremen.” Four cigar-smoking, tux-wearing swells recount their childhood and try to top each other with stories of hardship. One says he used to live in a single room with 26 others. “Eh, you were lucky to have a room! Tim Harford's Undercover Economist blog on the economics of everyday life Tuesday archive : If the price is right From 8th July, 2006. If you want to be rich, you can try to set up a brilliantly successful company. Or you can steal money. Stumbling and Mumbling Nobody will thank me for saying so, but I have a bit of a mancrush on Ed Smith. Yet again, he has raised a profound point in the social sciences: Nakedly ambitious people rarely achieve their ambitions...Simplistic self-interest is not just bad PR, it is often bad strategy. It suffers from a fatal flaw: it is predictable. This draws our attention to the fact that, in some domains, randomness is the best policy.

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