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Nonviolent Communication - San Francisco Lecture / Workshop - Marshall Rosenberg -

Nonviolent Communication - San Francisco Lecture / Workshop - Marshall Rosenberg -

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Making Life Work. For You. For Everyone. No Exceptions. In this 6-month, 3-part telecourse, Miki Kashtan shows with astonishing clarity how, with dedication to practice and support from others, you can begin to participate in creating the world so many of us long for, a world that honors and seeks to meet the needs of everyone, that welcomes each person’s truth, that rests on faith that solutions can be found to the most challenging problems facing us, individually and collectively. Your participation starts with your willingness to risk opening to yourself in a new way: to your deepest longings, to the hearts of those who are frighteningly “other,” to the uncertainty of life without the absolutes of “right” and “wrong,” “good” and “bad.” The more people who join you in taking the first step, the nearer this world becomes. If you can say “yes” to any of the points below, then this course is definitely for you: Fridays, May 24 and 31, June 14 and 28 12:00-2:00pm PDT - My Time Zone? This class’s carefully designed practices are aimed at:

Noam Sayin'? The High Times Interview with Noam Chomsky, Noam Chomsky interviewed by T.A. Sedlak Q: You've spoken out against the War on Drugs, explaining that it's essentially a means to lock up poor people, that it actually increases drug use, and that it serves as an excuse to control foreign nations. Would you briefly elaborate on these points? A: Let's grant that there's a drug problem, for the sake of argument -- drugs meaning, you know, cocaine, marijuana and so on. Suppose you accept that. How do you deal with it?

How to Practice Nonviolent Communication (with pictures) Edit Article394,941 views 42 Editors Edited 8 weeks ago Nonviolent Communication (NVC)[1] includes a simple method for clear, empathic communication, consisting of four steps: ObservationsFeelingsNeedsRequests NVC aims to find a way for all present to get what really matters to them without the use of guilt, humiliation, shame, blame, coercion, or threats. It is useful for resolving conflicts, connecting with others, and living in a way that is conscious, present, and attuned to the genuine, living needs of yourself and others. Hamburg course - Compassionate Communication Hamburg With the help of Nonviolent Communication (NVC) we’re going to learn to come closer to ourselves, listening carefully to what we’re thinking, feeling and needing. First we connect with the first layer, the way we’ve been educated to think: what’s right and wrong with the others/with ourselves, what we think we deserve, how we should behave in society, in family… This is where most of the violence on our planet comes from: a way of thinking made to obey authority – a language that tries to change other people using punishments, blame, guilt, shame or rewards. When caught up with becoming either the winner or the loser, it’s very challenging to experience compassion and feel happy. Connecting with this way of thinking is essential to get deeper into a more intimate space: the need space. This is a very personal quest, and for me the most important thing of my life.

Cultural Hybridity In The UK The age of postmodernism has introduced a sceptical view of social constructs such as culture and has placed more emphasis on the interpretation of each individual person. It is no surprise then, that with rise of Globalization which has seen the process of an integrated global network with different societies mingling together, that new ethnic identities have formed. Stuart Hall states "Modern people of all sorts and conditions, it seems to me, have had, as a condition of survival, to be members simultaneously, of several overlapping 'imagined communities" Over the past few decades the UK population has experienced an influx of cultural diversity with the percentage of white British decreasing from 93% in 2001, to 90% in 2007. For Sociologists there is much discussion about the effect this has had on UK society and the national identity.

6 Exercises To Strengthen Compassionate Leadership Disney has been known for its litigious nature in the past, going so far as to change copyright law in order to keep Mickey Mouse out of public domain. That's why it's kind of weird that a movie filmed at Disney World, unapproved by the Mouse House, even exists at all. After making a splash at Sundance this year, though, the intriguing Escape From Tomorrow appears to be heading for a theatrical release--and the first trailer is now online. First-time director Randy Moore shot the film at the Florida theme park, guerrilla-style, over a series of visits with his crew and an unknown cast. Details of the terms Moore worked out with Disney remain under wraps for now, but the controversial matter seems to be settled. While the circumstances surrounding Escape's production have dominated the conversation thus far, with the release of this trailer, perhaps talk will shift to the movie itself.

Cannabis Prohibition The debate on whether or not to make cannabis legal has been a subject of controversy for decades. On one side many people think it should remain illegal as they believe it has links to psychosis, lung cancer and is a gateway towards harder drugs. On the other hand many people advocate the legalization believing the supposed dangers of the drug are over exaggerated and it would significantly reduce illegal trade on the black market. In my opinion I believe it should be legalized as it is an attack on personal choice and would benefit society in many other ways. The following arguments will help support this.

No Pushing, No Giving Up by Miki Kashtan One of the common misconceptions about the practice of Nonviolent Communication is that it’s about being “nice.” It’s probably a similar misconception to that of thinking of nonviolence as passivity. I believe both misconceptions derive from our habit of either/or thinking. Most of us don’t have models for a path that’s neither aggressive nor passive. Within this either/or thinking, if the only two models are imposing on others or giving up on our own needs, many of us will interpret nonviolence as the latter.

Do online courses spell the end for the traditional university? Two years ago, I sat in the back seat of a Toyota Prius in a rooftop car park in California and gripped the door handle as the car roared away from the kerb, headed straight towards the roof's edge and then at the last second sped around a corner without slowing down. There was no one in the driver's seat. It was the prototype of Google's self-driving car and it felt a bit like being Buck Rogers and catapulted into another century. Later, I listened to Sebastian Thrun, a German-born professor of artificial intelligence at Stanford University, explain how he'd built it, how it had already clocked up 200,000 miles driving around California, and how one day he believed it would mean that there would be no traffic accidents.

Ten Years After Decriminalization, Drug Abuse Down by Half in Portugal Drug warriors often contend that drug use would skyrocket if we were to legalize or decriminalize drugs in the United States. Fortunately, we have a real-world example of the actual effects of ending the violent, expensive War on Drugs and replacing it with a system of treatment for problem users and addicts. Ten years ago, Portugal decriminalized all drugs. One decade after this unprecedented experiment, drug abuse is down by half: Health experts in Portugal said Friday that Portugal’s decision 10 years ago to decriminalise drug use and treat addicts rather than punishing them is an experiment that has worked. “There is no doubt that the phenomenon of addiction is in decline in Portugal,” said Joao Goulao, President of the Institute of Drugs and Drugs Addiction, a press conference to mark the 10th anniversary of the law.

How to Spot BS and Never Feel Insulted Again: A Brief Introduction to General Semantics and Non-Violent Communication There are few things quite so mis-understood by humans as their own psyche and behaviours. A few examples of our distortions from reality include concepts such as the existence of 'good and evil' people, or of a human having a distinctly separate 'mind and body' and hence having separate 'mental' and 'physical' health. Such old superstitions are still passed around human cultures today, even decades after evidence that shows them to be irrelevant has passed from the cutting edge of science. How this happens*: One broad (very rough) yet still useful way in which brain structure has been modelled for decades looks at how the central nervous systems of various creatures have evolved over millions of years, since most living animals today share some particular observable brain structures and nervous mechanisms. This 'Triune brain' model was composed by Paul MacLean in the 1960's and popularised by Carl Sagan in his Pulitzer Prize-winning book "The Dragons of Eden".

How Economic Inequality Is (Literally) Making Us Sick Imagine there was one changeable factor that affected virtually every measure of a country’s health— including life expectancy, crime rates, addiction, obesity, infant mortality, stroke, academic achievement, happiness and even overall prosperity. Indeed, this factor actually exists. It’s called economic inequality.