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Welcome to GoCognitive

Welcome to GoCognitive

http://gocognitive.net/

Related:  Mental Health

Giving Yourself Permission – a Key to Relieving Depression! 27th February 2016 By Nanice Ellis Guest writer for Wake Up World Social intelligence Social intelligence is the capacity to effectively negotiate complex social relationships and environments.[1] Psychologist Nicholas Humphrey believes that it is social intelligence, rather than quantitative intelligence, that defines humans. Social scientist Ross Honeywill believes social intelligence is an aggregated measure of self- and social-awareness, evolved social beliefs and attitudes, and a capacity and appetite to manage complex social change. A person with a high social intelligence quotient (SQ) is no better or worse than someone with a low SQ, but they have different attitudes, hopes, interests and desires.[2] The original definition by Edward Thorndike in 1920 is "the ability to understand and manage men and women, boys and girls, to act wisely in human relations".[3] It is equivalent to interpersonal intelligence, one of the types of intelligence identified in Howard Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences, and closely related to theory of mind. Hypothesis[edit]

8 Ways to be UBER Charismatic What did JFK, Marilyn Monroe and Hitler all have in common? They were all renowned charismatics that lit up every room they entered. You’ve most likely met one of these kinds before. The guy/girl at the party. They possess some strange quality that causes them to be liked by everyone and constantly at the center of attention. Mind & Brain News May 19, 2017 — A new study has served to identify some genetic mutations that will help to improve the treatment of ... read more May 19, 2017 — Scientists have made an important step in understanding the organization of nerve cells embedded within the gut that control its function -- a discovery that could give insight into the origin of ... read more Scientists to Test Zika Virus on Brain Tumors May 19, 2017 — In a revolutionary first, scientists will test whether the Zika virus can destroy brain tumor cells, potentially leading to new treatments for one of the hardest to treat cancers. ... read more

Body of Thought: How Trivial Sensations Can Influence Reasoning, Social Judgment and Perception Why do we look up to those we respect, stoop to the level of those we disdain and think warmly about those we love? Why do we hide dirty secrets or wash our hands of worries? Why do we ponder weighty subjects and feel a load lift after we have made a decision? Why do we look back on the past and forward to the future? Such turns of phrase, invoking a physical reality that stands in for intangible concepts, might seem like linguistic flights of fancy. The Mental (Illness) system and thoughts on alternatives: a collection “It is no measure of health to be well-adjusted to a profoundly sick society.” – Jiddu Krishnamurti I can’t call the current system of care a “mental health system” when it’s so clearly one that generates, encourages and sustains mental illness. And so I’ve often referred to it as a mental illness system. Here I’m underscoring that as it’s important that we make big changes if we want to help not only the most vulnerable people in our society, but also society itself.

40 Lessons for Finding Strength in Hard Times post written by: Marc Chernoff Sometimes you have to die a little on the inside first in order to be reborn and rise again as a stronger, smarter version of yourself. Nobody gets through life without losing someone they love, someone they need, or something they thought was meant to be. But it is these losses that make us stronger and eventually move us toward future opportunities for growth and happiness. Over the past five years Angel and I have dealt with several hardships, including the sudden death of a sibling, the loss of a best friend to illness, betrayal from a business partner, and an unexpected (breadwinning) employment layoff.

How to Deal with Criticism Well: 25 Reasons to Embrace It “Criticism is something you can easily avoid by saying nothing, doing nothing, and being nothing.” ~Aristotle At the end of the day, when I feel completely exhausted, oftentimes it has nothing to do with all the things I’ve done. It’s not a consequence of juggling multiple responsibilities and projects. Love and Stockholm Syndrome Love and Stockholm Syndrome: The Mystery of Loving an Abuser by Joseph M.

120 Ways to Boost Your Brain Power Here are 120 things you can do starting today to help you think faster, improve memory, comprehend information better and unleash your brain’s full potential. Solve puzzles and brainteasers.Cultivate ambidexterity. Use your non-dominant hand to brush your teeth, comb your hair or use the mouse. Write with both hands simultaneously. Kanna: African Herb for Depression? Kanna (Sceletium tortuosum) has been used in traditional South African medicine for centuries to help boost mood and reduce stress, anxiety and tension. I discussed its use for treating depression with Tieraona Low Dog, M.D., an internationally recognized expert in the fields of integrative medicine, dietary supplements and women's health, and an expert on botanical medicine. She told me that kanna contains an alkaloid called mesembrine that may act as a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (many commonly prescribed antidepressant medications inhibit the reuptake of serotonin). However, Dr. Low Dog notes that there has not been much research on kanna, and its safety has not been well-established. She says that if she were treating mild depression, she probably would opt for better-studied natural remedies, such as St.

Managing Adbandonment Depession Here is a map of the layering of defensive reactions to the underlying feelings of abandonment typically found in Complex PTSD. This territory is best viewed through unwinding the dynamics of emotional flashbacks. Flashbacks are at the deepest level painful layers of reactions - physiological, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral - to the reemerging despair of the childhood abandonment depression. One very common flashback-scenario occurs as follows: Internal or external perceptions of possible abandonment trigger fear and shame, which then activates panicky Inner Critic cognitions, which in turn launches an adrenalized fight, flight, freeze or fawn trauma response (subsequently referred to as the 4F's). The 4F's correlate respectively with narcissistic, obsessive-compulsive, dissociative or codependent defensive reactions.

Related:  Teaching