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50 Incredibly Weird Facts About the Human Body

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11 Awesome Hangover Cures | Hang Over Remedies | MANjr Hangovers are the worst. That nasty combo of headache, nausea and gut-pain can cost you precious hours of your life. While there are certainly preventative measures you can take to reduce the likelihood of a hangover (headache medication, food, lots of water before bed, etc.), inevitably you’re going to get stuck with a dirty hangover that you need to crush before it kills your day. 11. Ginger is an all-purpose digestive aid. 10. Honey is a great antioxidant that’s loaded with fructose and glucose. 9. For desert drunks, the prickly pear is a solid morning option that’ll help take the edge off the hurt. 8. Yep, eggs. 7. Oh the sweet, sweet nectar of Coca Cola can do wonders for a messed up belly. 6. Whether you’re pounding pancakes at IHOP, feasting on French toast at Norm’s or plowing through Moons Over My Hammy at Denny’s, greasy-ass diner food will help you booze-coated belly correct itself. 5. Electrolytes. 4. 3. 2. More rice noodle love here. 1. Related Posts

900-Year-Old Viking Message Solved! Photo by Jonas Nordby via forskning.no For the past several years researchers have been trying to crack a Viking rune alphabet known as Jötunvillur, a perplexing code dating back to the 11th or 12th century that’s been found in some 80 inscriptions including the scratched piece of wood found above. Recently runologist (!) For the jötunvillur code, one would replace the original runic character with the last sound of the rune name. The act of coding secret messages appears to have been a leisure activity amongst the Vikings, as some of the other translated inscriptions turned out to be playful taunts at the person doing the decoding. Update: Ida Kvittingen wrote to clarify several aspects of this piece that appears to have been lost in translation from the original article in Forskning.no. The inscription “kiss me” is NOT written using the jötunvillur code. For further information you can see more the article in an English version on ScienceNordic.

News - Magnetic bacteria may help build future bio-computers 7 May 2012Last updated at 05:40 ET Tiny magnets form inside magnetic bacteria Magnet-making bacteria may be building biological computers of the future, researchers have said. A team from the UK's University of Leeds and Japan's Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology have used microbes that eat iron. As they ingest the iron, the microbes create tiny magnets inside themselves, similar to those in PC hard drives. The research may lead to the creation of much faster hard drives, the team of scientists say. The study appears in the journal Small. As technology progresses and computer components get smaller and smaller, it becomes harder to produce electronics on a nano-scale. So researchers are now turning to nature - and getting microbes involved. Magnetic bacteria In the current study, the scientists used the bacterium Magnetospirilllum magneticum. These naturally magnetic microorganisms usually live in aquatic environments such as ponds and lakes, below the surface where oxygen is scarce.

Vitamins, Vitamin Table Deutsch: Gesundheits- und Fitnessrechner Here you can calculate the following informations on health and fitness topics:BMI | Ideal weight | Calorie consumption | Liquid consumption | Walking Index | Nutrition values | Vitamin table | Basic conversion | Body fat (adipose) rate | Optimal training pulse and heart rate | Protein requirement | Fat requirement | Nutrition value need | WHR - Waist to hip ratio | Drink reminder Vitamins Here you can find a detailed table of the most important vitamins. Convert length units and weight units. © Jumk.de Webprojects | Imprint & Privacy No responsibility is taken for the correctness of these informations. <div style="color:#ff0000;font-weight:bold">JavaScript must be activated to be able tu use the calculator.

Completely Useless, Yet Interesting, Facts Collection This is a web site of all the useless facts, cool trivia, and interesting information that have been collected from various sources over the past few years. True to its name, most of the facts are useless, but many of them may actually help you in the future. Random Facts Giraffes are the only animals born with horns. Both males and females are born with bony knobs on the forehead. An old law in Bellingham, Washington, made it illegal for a woman to take more than 3 steps backwards while dancing. Golf was banned in England in 1457 because it was considered a distraction from the serious pursuit of archery. When Coca-Cola began to be sold in China, they used characters that would sound like "Coca-Cola" when spoken. The only insect that can turn its head 360 degrees is the praying mantis. The short-term memory capacity for most people is between five and nine items or digits. Richard Milhouse Nixon was the first US President whose name contains all the letters from the word "criminal".

Tooth decay to be a thing of the past? Enzyme responsible for dental plaque sticking to teeth deciphered The Groningen professors Bauke Dijkstra and Lubbert Dijkhuizen have deciphered the structure and functional mechanism of the glucansucrase enzyme that is responsible for dental plaque sticking to teeth. This knowledge will stimulate the identification of substances that inhibit the enzyme. Just add that substance to toothpaste, or even sweets, and caries will be a thing of the past. The results of the research have been published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The University of Groningen researchers analysed glucansucrase from the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri, which is present in the human mouth and digestive tract. Three dimensional structure Using protein crystallography, the researchers were able to elucidate the three dimensional (3D) structure of the enzyme. Functional mechanism The unravelling of the 3D structure provided the researchers with detailed insight into the functional mechanism of the enzyme. Inhibitors

sleepyti.me bedtime calculator List of common misconceptions From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This incomplete list is not intended to be exhaustive. This list corrects erroneous beliefs that are currently widely held about notable topics. Each misconception and the corresponding facts have been discussed in published literature. Note that each entry is formatted as a correction; the misconceptions themselves are implied rather than stated. Arts and culture Food and cooking Roll-style Western sushi. Searing meat does not "seal in" moisture, and in fact may actually cause meat to lose moisture. Legislation and crime Literature The Harry Potter books, though they have broken children's book publishing records, have not led to an increase in reading among children or adults, nor slowed the ongoing overall decline in book purchases by Americans, and children who did read the Harry Potter books were not more likely to go on to read more outside of the fantasy and mystery genres.[21][22][23][24] Music Religion Hebrew Bible Buddhism Christianity Islam Sports

Bees Solve Hard Computing Problems Faster Than Supercomputers We already know bees are pretty good at facial recognition, and researchers have shown they can also be effective air-quality monitors. Here's one more reason to keep them around: They're smarter than computers. Bumblebees can solve the classic "traveling salesman" problem, which keeps supercomputers busy for days. They learn to fly the shortest possible route between flowers even if they find the flowers in a different order, according to a new British study. The traveling salesman problem is an (read: very hard) problem in computer science; it involves finding the shortest possible route between cities, visiting each city only once. Bees need lots of energy to fly, so they seek the most efficient route among networks of hundreds of flowers. To test bee problem-solving, researchers Lars Chittka and Mathieu Lihoreau tested bees' response to computer-controlled artificial flowers.

The biology of dreaming o one would normally consider David Maurice, Ph.D., professor of ocular physiology in the Department of Ophthalmology at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, a revolutionary. Nevertheless, he has reignited a decades-long controversy that could spark a revolutionary re-evaluation of an entire field of behavioral research. Dr. Maurice has developed a startling new line of scientific inquiry that, when added to other findings, could change our understanding of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and the nature of dreams. What Maurice has done is to suggest an alternative explanation for the phenomenon known as REM sleep, the stage in which the eyes rapidly move and most dreams occur. Dr. "Without REM," Maurice told 21stC, "our corneas would starve and suffocate while we are asleep with our eyes closed." Maurice's interest in REM began a few years ago. "What is at stake here is a theory of dreams that is scientifically valid," Dr. Interpretation vs. observation Drs. No final answer in sight 1.

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