background preloader

Man's Search for Meaning

Man's Search for Meaning
According to a survey conducted by the Book-of-the-Month Club and the Library of Congress, Man's Search For Meaning belongs to a list of "the ten most influential books in the United States."[1] At the time of the author's death in 1997, the book had sold over 10 million copies and had been translated into 24 languages.[2][3] Editions[edit] The book's title in the German language was ...trotzdem Ja zum Leben sagen: Ein Psychologe erlebt das Konzentrationslager, and the title of the first English language translation was From Death-Camp to Existentialism. Experiences in a concentration camp[edit] Frankl concludes that the meaning of life is found in every moment of living; life never ceases to have meaning, even in suffering and death. An example of Frankl's idea of finding meaning in the midst of extreme suffering is found in his account of an experience he had while working in the harsh conditions of the Auschwitz concentration camp: ... Quotations[edit] See also[edit] References[edit] Related:  Levels of consciousnessBooks to read A

Existential therapy Background[edit] The starting point of existential philosophy (see Warnock, 1970; Macquarrie, 1972; Mace, 1999; Van Deurzen and Kenward, 2005) can be traced back to the nineteenth century and the work of Søren Kierkegaard and Friedrich Nietzsche. Both were in conflict with the predominant ideologies of their time and committed to the exploration of reality as it can be experienced in a passionate and personal manner. Kierkegaard (1813–55) protested vigorously against popular misunderstanding and abuse of Christian dogma and the so-called 'objectivity' of science (Kierkegaard, 1841, 1844). Nietzsche (1844–1900) took this philosophy of life a step further. Martin Heidegger (1889–1976) applied the phenomenological method to understanding the meaning of being (Heidegger, 1962, 1968). Jean-Paul Sartre (1905–80) contributed many other strands of existential exploration, particularly in terms of emotions, imagination, and the person's insertion into a social and political world.

Your Life - Train For It by Bear Grylls Bear Grylls is fitter, stronger and readier than ever to take on the challenges of the wild, thanks to a revolutionary new fitness program. And at the heart of Bear's personal training regime are fast-paced, dynamic workouts that can be done anywhere by anyone – men and women, young and old – in just 30 minutes or less! Select your workout: choose from Kettlebell Resistance training, Bodyweight workouts or Primal Power stretch sessions. Learn the moves: select your express workout based on the time you have available – be it 3 minutes or 30 – and then, as Bear says, ‘It's time to get BG fit!' Train hard but eat natural: follow Bear's simple and straightforward advice on fueling your body for maximum success and sustained health benefits. Train more efficiently with fast and achievable results – a fitter, stronger, healthier you is just around the corner.

15 Books to Add to Your 2014 Reading List Year-end book lists can sometimes seem like a giant homework assignment you totally forgot about until the week before finals. You meant to read the one that your friend recommended, or the other after your favorite author tweeted about it, but you never had the chance. Try not to think of this 2013's literary wrap-up as something you didn't finish this year. Image: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images Molly Horan Molly Horan was an editorial intern at Mashable.

Tetrapharmakos The Tetrapharmakos (τετραφάρμακος) "four-part remedy" is a summary of the first four of the Κύριαι Δόξαι (Kuriai Doxai, the forty Epicurean Principal Doctrines given by Diogenes Laertius in his Life of Epicurus) in Epicureanism, a recipe for leading the happiest possible life. They are recommendations to avoid anxiety or existential dread.[1] The four-part cure[edit] As expressed by Philodemos, and preserved in a Herculaneum Papyrus (1005, 4.9–14), the tetrapharmakos reads:[4] This is a summary of the first four of the forty Epicurean Principal Doctrines (Sovran Maxims) given by Diogenes Laertius, which in the translation by Robert Drew Hicks (1925) read as follows: 1. 2. 3. 4. Don't fear god[edit] In Hellenistic religion, the gods were conceived as hypothetical beings in a perpetual state of bliss, indestructible entities that are completely invulnerable. Don't worry about death[edit] As D. What is good is easy to get[edit] What is terrible is easy to endure[edit] References and notes[edit]

The Myth of Sisyphus The Myth of Sisyphus is a philosophical essay by Albert Camus. It comprises about 119 pages and was published originally in 1942 in French as Le Mythe de Sisyphe; the English translation by Justin O'Brien followed in 1955. In the essay, Camus introduces his philosophy of the absurd: man's futile search for meaning, unity, and clarity in the face of an unintelligible world devoid of God and eternal truths or values. Does the realization of the absurd require suicide? Camus answers: "No. Summary[edit] The essay is dedicated to Pascal Pia and is organized in four chapters and one appendix. Chapter 1: An Absurd Reasoning[edit] Camus undertakes to answer what he considers to be the only question of philosophy that matters: Does the realization of the meaninglessness and absurdity of life necessarily require suicide? He then characterizes a number of philosophies that describe and attempt to deal with this feeling of the absurd, by Heidegger, Jaspers, Shestov, Kierkegaard, and Husserl.

Logotherapy Basic principles[edit] The notion of Logotherapy was created with the Greek word logos ("meaning"). Frankl’s concept is based on the premise that the primary motivational force of an individual is to find a meaning in life. Life has meaning under all circumstances, even the most miserable ones.Our main motivation for living is our will to find meaning in life.We have freedom to find meaning in what we do, and what we experience, or at least in the stand we take when faced with a situation of unchangeable suffering.[4] The human spirit is referred to in several of the assumptions of logotherapy, but the use of the term spirit is not "spiritual" or "religious". Discovering meaning[edit] "Once, an elderly general practitioner consulted me because of his severe depression. Philosophical basis of logotherapy[edit] Frankl described the metaclinical implications of logotherapy in his book The Will of Meaning: Foundations and Applications of Logotherapy. Logotherapeutic views and treatment[edit]

The Bonfire of the Vanities The Bonfire of the Vanities is a 1987 novel by Tom Wolfe. The story is a drama about ambition, racism, social class, politics, and greed in 1980s New York City and centers on four main characters: WASP bond trader Sherman McCoy, Jewish assistant district attorney Larry Kramer, British expatriate journalist Peter Fallow, and black activist the Reverend Reginald Bacon. The novel was originally conceived as a serial in the style of Charles Dickens' writings; it ran in 27 installments in Rolling Stone starting in 1984. Wolfe heavily revised it before it was published in book form. Title[edit] The title is a reference to the historical Bonfire of the Vanities, which happened in 1497 in Florence, Italy, when the city was under the rule of the Dominican priest Girolamo Savonarola. Historical background[edit] Burton B. Writing and publication[edit] Wolfe began researching the novel by observing cases at the Manhattan Criminal Court and shadowing members of the Bronx homicide squad. [edit]

Teaching “The Odyssey” at San Quentin The opening of “The Odyssey” describes Odysseus as polytropos, a man “much turned” and “much turning.” He makes much happen, and much happens to him. When I selected “The Odyssey” as the first text for my English 101 course at San Quentin Prison, I worried about the choice. The theme of the course was life as a story, and at the first class, I asked them to tell a story from their own lives. When we first see Odysseus, he is gazing across the sea, weeping for home. Their points of resonance with Odysseus were many. Plotting against the suitors occupying his palace, Odysseus lies awake in doubt, reminding himself, “Bear up, old heart.” They recognized the undisciplined ego from which Odysseus proclaims his identity to the Cyclopes, thus inviting the wrath of Poseidon. Homer never tires of reminding us that when Agamemnon returned home, his wife had betrayed him and conspired in his murder, the better for the reader to appreciate the loyalty of Penelope.

10 Golden Lessons from Albert Einstein Every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving - Albert Einstein Albert Einstein was an amazing physicist. He figured out so many universal principles and equations that he was way ahead of his fellow scientists at any point of time. 1. Most people don’t try new things because of their fear of failure. 2. 30 years from now, you won’t possibly remember what chapters you had in your science book; you’d only remember what you learn on your way. 3. When you reflect on how far we humans have come from the prehistoric caves to mind-blowing technological advancements, you would feel the power of imagination. 4. Creativity and uniqueness often depends on how well you hide your sources. 5. If you think of all the top people in the world, they would have added something of value to the world. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

The Rebel (book) Vintage International's 1991 reissue of Anthony Bower's translation of The Rebel. The Rebel (French title: L'Homme révolté) is a 1951 book-length essay by Albert Camus, which treats both the metaphysical and the historical development of rebellion and revolution in societies, especially Western Europe. Camus relates writers and artists as diverse as Epicurus and Lucretius, Marquis de Sade, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Friedrich Nietzsche, Max Stirner, André Breton, and others in an integrated, historical portrait of man in revolt. Examining both rebellion and revolt, which may be seen as the same phenomenon in personal and social frames, Camus examines several 'countercultural' figures and movements from the history of Western thought and art, noting the importance of each in the overall development of revolutionary thought and philosophy. One of Camus' primary arguments in The Rebel concerns the motivation for rebellion and revolution.

Anatomy of the Spirit Anatomy of the Spirit: The Seven Stages of Power and Healing , written by medical intuitive author, and teacher Caroline Myss, is a non-fiction[citation needed] book which discusses the energy anatomy of human body and spirit. First published in 1996, the book went to stay at the New York Times Best Seller list for many months.[1] It was later, also released as an Audio book [2] Overview[edit] Chapter listing[edit] Introduction: A Brief Personal HistoryPart I:A New Language of the Spirit Energy Medicine and IntuitionMade in the Image of GodPart II:The Seven Sacred Truths The First Chakra: Tribal PowerThe Second Chakra: The Power of RelationshipsThe Third Chakra: Personal PowerThe Fourth Chakra: Emotional PowerThe Fifth Chakra: The Power of WillThe Sixth Chakra: The Power of the MindThe Seventh Chakra: Our Spiritual ConnectorA Guide for the Contemporary Mystic Further reading[edit] Excerpts from Part 1-3: Anatomy of the Spirit References[edit] External links[edit]

Related: