background preloader

Quiet, Please: Unleashing 'The Power Of Introverts'

Quiet, Please: Unleashing 'The Power Of Introverts'
Introverts, who prefer quieter, lower-stimulation environments, have trouble thriving in today's extrovert-oriented culture, says author Susan Cain. iStockphoto.com hide caption toggle caption iStockphoto.com From Gandhi to Joe DiMaggio to Mother Teresa to Bill Gates, introverts have done a lot of good work in the world. But being quiet, introverted or shy was sometimes looked at as a problem to overcome. In the 1940s and '50s the message to most Americans was: Don't be shy. Susan Cain — who considers herself an introvert — has written a new book that tells the story of how introversion fell out of style. Quiet The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain Interview Highlights On the difference between introversion and shyness "Introversion is really about having a preference for lower stimulation environments. "Many people believe that introversion is about being antisocial, and that's really a misperception. On how today's workplaces are designed for extroverts

http://www.npr.org/2012/01/30/145930229/quiet-please-unleashing-the-power-of-introverts

Related:  Introvertstanjuska

Portrait of an Introvert People don’t outgrow introversion, so the introverted adult was once an introverted child. What is true of one is true of both. Contrary to popular opinion, introverts are not asocial, nor are they friendless loners who lack social skills. They simply have different social needs and preferences. The Book That Started the<br>Quiet Revolution - Quiet Revolution Passionately argued, impressively researched, and filled with indelible stories of real people, Susan Cain’s Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking shows how dramatically we undervalue introverts and how much we lose in doing so. Taking the reader on a journey from Dale Carnegie’s birthplace to Harvard Business School and from a Tony Robbins seminar to an evangelical megachurch, Cain charts the rise of the Extrovert Ideal in the twentieth century and explores its far-reaching effects. She talks to Asian-American students who feel alienated from the brash, backslapping atmosphere of American schools. She questions the dominant values of American business culture, where forced collaboration can stand in the way of innovation and where the leadership potential of introverts is often overlooked. And she draws on cutting-edge research in psychology and neuroscience to reveal the surprising differences between extroverts and introverts.

22 Tips To Better Care for Introverts and Extroverts 2.1K Flares Filament.io 2.1K Flares × Here is something that hit me recently: For a long time I had a certain idea about what makes an introvert or an extrovert. I had always thought that it works something like this: Extroversion relates to how outgoing someone isIntroversion is the same as being shy. Difference Between Introversion & Shyness (Are You Getting it Wrong Too?) When people throw out conversation advice, they often mix up the terms introversion and shyness. The truth is, they are completely different concepts that cannot be used interchangeably. But I do feel they are related in several ways, which I’ll go over later. Drink Coffee? Off With Your Head! : The Salt Most folks who resolved to cut down on coffee this year are driven by the simple desire for self-improvement. But for coffee drinkers in 17th-century Turkey, there was a much more concrete motivating force: a big guy with a sword. Sultan Murad IV, a ruler of the Ottoman Empire, would not have been a fan of Starbucks. Under his rule, the consumption of coffee was a capital offense. hide captionThough Murad IV banned tobacco, alcohol and coffee, some say he consumed all three and his death was the result of alcohol poisoning. Adam Cole/NPR

How to run a brainstorm for introverts (and extroverts too) Cocktail party trivia: Brainstorming was invented in the 1930s as a practical idea-generation technique for regular use by “creatives” within the ad agency BBDO. That all changed in 1942, when Alex Osborn — the “O” in BBDO — released a book called How to Think Up and excited the imaginations of his fellow Mad Men. Since 1942, the idea-generation technique that began life in a New York creative firm has grown into the happy kudzu of Silicon Valley startups. Somewhere near Stanford, an introvert cringes every time the idea comes up of sitting in a roomful of colleagues, drawing half-baked ideas on Post-it notes, and then pasting them to the wall for all to see.

Susan Cain’s ‘Quiet’ Argues for the Power of Introverts My neighbor, a leadership development consultant who regularly helps people improve themselves through personality tests like the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, once told me I was the most introverted person he’d ever met. I took this as a compliment. Who wouldn’t? What Does It Mean To Be An Introvert? The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American. Quick Quiz: Which of the following are signs of introversion? Highly sensitiveDeep ThinkerReflectiveIntrospectiveNegative emotionsSocially AnxiousDefensiveVulnerableAlways prefers solitude over social interaction

Apparently There Are 4 Kinds of Introversion Introversion, thanks largely to Susan Cain's 2012 best seller Quiet, is having something of a cultural moment. Once a mostly misunderstood personality trait — and often considered a behavioral defect when it was considered at all — it's now the subject of countless other books and online listicles (and, more recently, parodies of listicles). And as more regular, non-scientist types started to talk about introversion, psychologist Jonathan Cheek began to notice something: The way many introverts defined the trait was different from the way he and most of his academic colleagues did. "When you survey a person on the street, asking them to define introversion, what comes up as the prototypical characteristics ... are things like thoughtful or introspective," said Cheek, a psychology professor at Wellesley College. And yet neither of these things are part of the definition of the trait according to scientific literature. Quiz: What kind of introvert are you?

Eric Klinenberg’s Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone—Are women better at living alone? Illustration by Rob Donnelly. Earlier this year, divorcee Dominique Browning published an essay in the New York Times positing a gender gap in the talent for living alone. She and her single female neighbors, she wrote, relish the freedom to eat at odd hours and monopolize the bed, while men are indifferent to these perks. Nesting at home, she went on to assert, women feel safe. “Men,” though, “are hard-wired to feel danger all the time … Being alone feels dangerous to a man.” These generalizations incensed commenters and bloggers, one of whom offered this summary: “Binary gender norms are alive and thriving, except the roles have reversed (sort of).”

Networking for Introverts The hardest part of looking for a job for a majority of individuals is networking at an event. For some, it is easy and comes naturally. For others, it is a painful endeavor and to go to a networking event brings panic and anxiety. The interesting thing about me is that I am an introvert. Tests I have taken say that I get along with everyone and that networking comes naturally to me.

10 Ways Introverts Interact Differently With The World Introverts and extraverts may seem the same on the surface, but if you look at the way they respond to life’s everyday occurrences, differences begin to emerge. Last month, for example, Science of Us writer Melissa Dahl reported on findings from psychologist Brian Little’s latest book on personality science, Me, Myself, and Us: The Science of Personality and the Art of Well-Being, which showed that introverts are better off avoiding caffeine before a big meeting or important event. Little cites the theory of extraversion by Hans Eysenck and research by William Revelle of Northwestern University, explaining that introverts and extraverts naturally differ when it comes to their alertness and responsiveness to a given environment.

National Philanthropic Trust Acts 20: 35 It is more blessed to give than to receive. Jane Addams Social advance depends quite as much upon an increase in moral sensibility as it does upon a sense of duty.

Related: