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100 Words for Facial Expressions

100 Words for Facial Expressions
By Mark Nichol Face it — sometimes you must give your readers a countenance-based clue about what a character or a subject is feeling. First try conveying emotions indirectly or through dialogue, but if you must fall back on a descriptive term, try for precision: 1. Absent: preoccupied 2. Agonized: as if in pain or tormented 3. Subscribe to Receive our Articles and Exercises via Email You will improve your English in only 5 minutes per day, guaranteed! 12 Responses to “100 Words for Facial Expressions” Lucia Hello!

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exactly There are no items for this category just, exactly, precisely adv. indicating exactness or preciseness; "he was doing precisely (or exactly) what she had told him to do"; "it was just as he said--the jewel was gone"; "it has just enough salt" indeed adv. (used as an interjection) an expression of surprise or skepticism or irony etc.; "Wants to marry the butler? Writing About the Weather Writing about the weather in your novel, and writing about it well, is critical for an atmospheric story. It's also a great shortcut... A simple description of storm clouds gathering on the horizon, say, can foreshadow troubled times ahead in the plot and save yards of complicated explanation about the character's mood. Forget about writing novels for a moment – it's easy to forget just how important a part of our everyday lives the weather is.

MASTER LIST of Facial Expressions! Writers need good descriptions of facial expressions in their stories to help the readers picture the characters, to convey emotions, and to set up lines of dialogue without having to write “said” or any of its synonyms. However, it’s easy for us to rely on the same descriptions over and over again. I created this list to address that challenge. The expressions are broken down by the part of the face.

Cliche Finder Have you been searching for just the right cliché to use? Are you searching for a cliché using the word "cat" or "day" but haven't been able to come up with one? Just enter any words in the form below, and this search engine will return any clichés which use that phrase... Over 3,300 clichés indexed! What exactly is a cliche?

10 top writing tips and the psychology behind them There are plenty of folks happy to tell you how to write better, just as any doctor will tell you to “eat right and exercise.” But changing your writing (or eating) habits only happens when you understand why you do what you do. I can help you with that. That proposal or email you wrote must now compete for attention with Facebook and the Huffington Post. Here’s how to compete more effectively, and why you’re not doing it already.

Obsidian Bookshelf blog: HT Describe Hair Here at Obsidianbookshelf.com, I tend to recommend "less is more" with physical description in fiction. However, I'll admit that descriptions of hair can be beautiful, especially in romance or fantasy fiction. Look here for tips on describing your character's hair. You're welcome to print out this how-to for your own use, or your critique group's use, or you can link back to this article from your blog, but please don't copy this content to your blog or website. A note on the advice to be found here.

How to Write a Book Blurb By far, the weakest part of many self-published books is the synopsis found on Amazon and elsewhere. Worse than the cover, worse than the writing in the book itself, there are a lot of blurbs on Amazon that are pretty near atrocious. I include my own books in this category. Writing a decent blurb is an artform totally separate from writing a book. Authors are also on record saying this is their least favorite part of the process. It can make you feel icky writing superlatives about your own book.

Idioms – as clear as mud? Miranda Steel is a freelance ELT lexicographer and editor. She has worked as a Senior Editor for dictionaries for learners at OUP and has also worked for COBUILD. In this post, she looks at some of the weird and wonderful idioms in the English language. Idioms are commonly used in spoken and written English. They add colour and interest to what we are saying. No one could see the colour blue until modern times This isn’t another story about that dress, or at least, not really. It’s about the way that humans see the world, and how until we have a way to describe something, even something so fundamental as a colour, we may not even notice that it’s there. Until relatively recently in human history, “blue” didn’t exist.

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