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Popsicle Stick Bracelets

Popsicle Stick Bracelets
So I was looking through my vintage craft book collection and ran across a 1970 Pack O’ Fun magazine. They had instructions on how to take a simple popsicle stick and turn it into a bracelet. I’m always happy to try and take a good idea and run with it. Well, I’m certainly on board for that. The thought of being able to make wood pliable put all kinds of ideas in my head. But we’ll start with the project at hand which happened to be bracelets. Are you new to the Sitcom? For this project I used: Popsicle sticks (bought the industrial strength size bag from Walmart because this project might go in future directions)Drinking glass (for forming- use a glass with a top opening that is slightly smaller than you want your bracelet to end up)Emory board or sand paperAcrylic paintStick on jewels (for bling)Mod Podge The instructions in the magazine called for allowing the popsicle sticks to sit in water overnight. Now for the fun part!! A simple craft with cute results! Signing you up!

Shrinky Bracelet If you grew up in the 80's, like I did, you're probably already familiar with the awesomeness that is Shrinky Dinks...but did you know that you can still buy Shrinky Dinks? Yep, they're still out there - in craft stores, hobby shops, and even on Amazon. But you don't have to buy a Shrinky Dink kit to have all the fun. Just look for #6 plastic containers and you can make your own! There is a great tutorial on Instructables (courtesy of Dabbled) with all the instructions for making your own shrinky projects from #6 plastic containers, so I won't go into too much detail here. Most of this post is actually about turning these awesome little pieces of plastic into a sweet bracelet (and bonus pendant) to give to mom for Mother's Day. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Use a pair of pliers to open the rings. 8. Surprise mom with a priceless piece of jewelry made by her little artists! Cute, right?

Zip-up Earbuds I love to have my music with me everywhere I go, but I hate the tangled mess my wires become when I toss them in my bag or pocket. Last night I whipped up a fun and functional solution by adding a zipper to my earbuds. This project took me around an hour to do (perfect for catching up on some t.v. from hulu.com). The supplies are few; basic sewing supplies, a pair of headphones, and a nice long zipper. I happened to have this crazy purple and gold nike zipper I found thrifting a while ago, it seemed perfect for this project. The first step is to pull the earbuds apart, to separate the wires all the way down to the plug. Next, take one side of your headphones and one side of the zipper tape and start stitching the wire into the tape. It’s as easy as that! Then unzip them to the length I want and put them on so much faster than having to untangle the mess!

tuto tableau papier Negative Butterfly/Flower Whew. Ok. "Negative" week has literally tuckered me out. But I did it. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Note: This is original work. Friendship Bracelets Macraméd friendship bracelets were all the rage when I was growing up in the eighties. All the girls at my school would obsessively make them for one another in a dizzying variety of colors, widths, and patterns. It's amazing, thinking back, that such young girls could make such beautifully intricate accessories. I, of course, tried my hand at making them as well. I would ride my bike down to the five-and-dime store and pick out the most sophisticated color combinations of embroidery floss I could find, but when it came to the actual macramé I never got beyond plain stripes. There was nothing wrong with plain stripes, except that the other girls seemed so much more advanced with their diamonds and chevrons. Fast forward 20 years: Purl Soho started carrying DMC Cotton Embroidery Floss in every conceivable color (including fluorescents! Making friendship bracelets is a surprisingly easy craft, and best of all, in the end you'll have a bunch of cute summer bracelets to give to your pals.

Glass Pendant Easy. Cheap. Adorable. How can you pass up something like this? I found places online where they sold the tutorials on how to make these glass pendant necklaces. Here’s mine for free. Supplies: paperexacto kniferulercutting boardglass tiles* (rectangular, circular, or square shapes available)bails* (I used aanraku small size)clear glue (I used Diamond Glaze. *glass pendants and bails can be found pretty much anywhere online… Amazon, Etsy supplies, etc. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Featuring Thea, my model…

Byzantine and Box Chain Maille Tutorials Of all the chain maille weaves, the Byzantine or birdcage is perhaps one of the most attractive for jewelry. It looks intricate but is actually one of the easiest to learn and there are many lovely variations. It's my favorite weave. You can mix metals or use colored metal for more visual interest as can be seen with this copper accented bracelet I made. Other options include adding beads to byzantine as you can see with the crackle beads on the left. If you like to learn how, here are the 8 steps needed to form the basic Byzantine which you then repeat to lengthen the chain. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Still confused? To add beads as shown in the above bracelet, add pairs of rings as side extensions. 9. The result is a slinky like chain. One book I can recommend is Scott David Plumlee's Handcrafting Chain and Bead Jewelry: Techniques for Creating Dimensional Necklaces and Bracelets . Beader Designs #: 472 -473 Related PostChain Maille : Ancient and Modern Uses

Earring Frame Holder Your accessories is one big mess you say? Can’t find the second part of an earring pair? Get organised with a homemade earring holder! It’ll take you no more than ten minutes. To make this frame for your accessories you’ll need the following supplies: A frame, chicken wire, a wire cutter and a stapler. Start with measuring how much chicken wire you need by holding it over the frame. Depending on what kind of frame you’ve got you might wanna make the chicken wire stand out a bit from the wall.

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