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Muscle and Brawn Bodybuilding, Powerlifting and Muscle Building.

Muscle and Brawn Bodybuilding, Powerlifting and Muscle Building.
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Build Muscle Mass Whilst Burning Fat Getting ripped six pack abs and a great toned body, is as much about burning fat as it is about building muscle. With this fantastic workout routine, you get the benefits of both. It has been tested and designed to burn maximum fat and build muscle. So check this out… Monday, Wednesday, Friday – Wake up in the morning, drink a glass of orange juice and run about 15-20 min Monday: Cardio – 15 min (treadmill or stationary bike) Chest: Bench press – 1 x 15, 1 x 12, 1 x 10, 3 x 8 Dumbbell flyes – 3 x 10 Inclined bench press – 2 x 10 Weighted dips – 1 x 8 Cable crossovers – 1 x 15 Shoulders: Behind the neck press – 1 x 15, 1 x 12, 2 x 10 Seated lateral dumbbell flyes – 2 x 10 Barbell upright rows – 2 x 12 Bent over dumbbell flyes – 3 x 10 Triceps: Lying barbell triceps extension – 1 x 15, 1 x 12, 2 x 8 Cable pressdowns – 2 x 10 Abs: Roman chair – 5 x max Lying leg raise – 5 x max Cardio 15 min Tuesday: Fast running – 15-20 min, Slow running – 30-40 min. Wednesday: Cardio – 15 min Thursday: Friday:

HRT: Animal Hellraiser Trainer - Series Overview - Bodybuilding.com Go through the 3 Hellraiser overviews below for complete details on HRT training, nutrition and supplementation. Watch the videos. Don't miss a step. To survive the halls of hell for 12 solid weeks, you need as much info as possible. Think you've got what it takes? 12 weeks, 4 Hell Sessions per week, 4 Hellcentric reps per set. 6 meals a day, 2-3 hours apart. No science? Follow Tom's plan to the letter. No training partner? Attention Gmail users: To make sure you receive Bodybuilding.com emails, please check your junk box after sign up and star messages from Bodybuilding.com. *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Hell is hard on your body. Out of 10 Good 99 Ratings Your comment has been posted! Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Showing 1 - of 4 Comments

thZYBMK34T - Copy Stop Training Like An Idiot! The 12-Week Shortcut To Size Stop training like an idiot! "Dumbbell" should describe your weights, not you. Let the smartest man in bodybuilding take you from beginner to advanced in just 12 weeks! But let's be fair... Maybe you've never lifted anything heavier than your coffee mug. Maybe you once lifted regularly, but of late, your trips to the gym have become as infrequent as a day of sobriety for Charlie Sheen. In either case, we have good news, in the form of the perfect 12-week plan for going from beginner to advanced. But enough about us; this is about you, only bigger, stronger, better. "This is about you, only bigger, stronger, better." How can anyone run the rack that fast? So on Monday, they might train chest; on Tuesday, back; on Wednesday, legs; on Thursday, shoulders; and on Friday, arms; with abs thrown in on one or two of those days for good measure. Splits come in all sorts of variations, but specific splits are better at certain points in your training evolution. Phase 1: The One-Day Split

No-Crunch Six-Pack Abs! by Matt Biss Jul 16, 2013 That's only one side of the story, though. Every muscle also works to keep something from happening. Your biceps, for example, are anti-elbow-extension; if they weren't, your arm could snap just handing a business card to someone. It's time you listen to them. The Anti-Crunch An abdominal crunch is a spinal flexion movement performed by your rectus abdominis. At the risk of starting an impromptu debate on intelligent design, I would argue that the rectus abdominis muscles are actually meant for anti-extension, rather than spinal flexion. To emphasize this point, grab a 25-pound weight and hold it at arm's length. The Anti-Ab All-Stars One of the best things the crunch has going for it is its simplicity. But effective anti-ab training doesn't have to be complicated or equipment-specific. I have a shirt hanging on the wall next to my desk that says "It's not a big belly—it's a thick waist." Conan's Wheel Watch The Video - 00:17 About The Author Featured Product

Isaiah 40:31 gif by MarijaK5 | Photobucket Men's Health Diet: Men's Health.com Men like rules. Rules are what make things interesting. After all, how much fun would it be if you had endless downs to reach the goal line, if the strike zone were an infinite expanse, or if the only time you got called for a double dribble was when you stopped to gawk at a cheerleader? Not very. That's why I created the Rules of the Ripped, pulled straight from my new book, The Men's Health Diet. Seven simple rules. Pullups Guys avoid pullups for mostly one reason: They're hard. And if you can't do even one, it's embarrassing to just hang there. Memories of seventh-grade gym class, matchstick arms, and laughing classmates aren't easily forgotten. But if you can't complete at least 10 in a row with perfect form, or haven't boosted your total by three or four in the past year, you're missing out. The pullup is the best way to work the biggest muscle group in your upper body: your latissimus dorsi. The solution? Instead of adjusting the amount of weight you lift to match your workout—as you would with free-weight or machine exercises—you'll adjust your workout based on your ability. The result: You'll have a better body—and the ghosts of junior high will finally be laid to rest. Test Your Limit Before you get started, determine how many pullups you can do. Here's the drill: Hang from a pullup bar using an overhand grip that's just beyond shoulder-width apart, your arms completely straight. Transform Your Body!

inklewriter - Education Education inkle is looking to bring interactive stories to the classroom, and give teachers free and simple get-stuck-right-in software to use with their students. From within a web-browser, the inklewriter will let students make and play interactive stories with no programming required. Why make stories interactive anyway? The way our stories work is simple: the reader is given the text of a story in a small chunks, and after each, they get to make a decision about what happens next. That could be what a character says, or does - but it could also be a deeper choice, like why a character has done what they've done, or how they feel about something else in the story. Our first project, Frankenstein, uses interactivity to explore the different facets of Mary Shelley's original novel - allowing the reader to discover different aspects of the world, follow up hints and allusions in the text, and maybe even take some narrative paths that Shelley herself considered. Oh, and it's all free.

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