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Datajournalismelab

Datajournalismelab

http://www.datajournalismelab.fr/

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Eurozone debt web: Who owes what to whom? The circle below shows the gross external, or foreign, debt of some of the main players in the eurozone as well as other big world economies. The arrows show how much money is owed by each country to banks in other nations. The arrows point from the debtor to the creditor and are proportional to the money owed as of the end of June 2011. The colours attributed to countries are a rough guide to how much trouble each economy is in.

Guardian launches open-source data journalism tool Collaborative data journalism platform Swarmize has launched today to offer editors and journalists better tools for the use of data, including real-time visualisation. Swarmize, now in alpha, won funding through the Knight News Challenge in June, and has been built at the Guardian over the last four months. "The Guardian and lots of other news organisations like to use Google Docs for collecting data," said Matt McAlister, the Guardian's general manager of new digital businesses. I'm hopeful that we'll start to see better data journalism because the tools are moving alongMatt McAlister, the Guardian "It's free, it's pretty easy to use, however it does have a lot of shortfalls," McAlister told Journalism.co.uk.

User:Poulpy/gallery From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository Sun Dec 30 04:33:54 CET 2012[edit] Kabufuda card: 1 (alternate design)Kabufuda card: 1 (standard design)Kabufuda card: 4 (alternate design)Kabufuda card: 4 (standard design)Kabufuda card: blank card Sat Dec 29 19:07:46 CET 2012[edit] Data journalism at the Guardian: what is it and how do we do it? Data journalism. What is it and how is it changing? Photograph: Alamy

Live map of London Underground trains Loading... Powered by Leaflet — Map tiles © Thunderforest, data © OpenStreetMap contributors. Live London Underground map By Matthew Somerville. Data collected: Mon, 05 Sep 2016 08:33:02 +0100 Le labo médias de l'école de journalisme de Sciences Po Crédit: Flickr/CC/jakerust W.I.P. demande à des invités de donner leur point de vue. Ici, Michael Shapiro, professeur à l’Ecole de journalisme de Columbia, à New York, qui vient d’écrire un livre intitulé “Tales from the great disruption”, fait le point sur la “valeur” des informations à l’heure des paywalls. En anglais. Infographic Designers' Sketchbooks by Steven Heller and Rick Landers reveals ... Copyright Tim Hucklesby Infographics are a staple of modern media. At their best, they’re elegant, streamlined visual capsules of information that help us process complex data at a glance. In Infographic Designers' Sketchbooks by Steven Heller and Rick Landers, out in October, more than 50 leading graphic designers and illustrators from around the world share their creative processes behind the art and science of data visualization. Using graphic shorthand to convey complex information has been used in magazines and newspapers since the 19th century, Heller writes, but today “a greater number of platforms and media outlets means it is incumbent on designers, who a decade ago would never have thought of themselves as ‘information architects,’ to become makers of some form of information visualization.” The book reveals various designers’ methods for developing and fleshing out ideas, from sketching drawings and doodles to digital mock-ups.

Data visualisation DIY: our top tools What data visualisation tools are out there on the web that are easy to use - and free? Here on the Datablog and Datastore we try to do as much as possible using the internet's powerful free options. That may sound a little disingenuous, in that we obviously have access to the Guardian's amazing Graphics and interactive teams for those pieces where we have a little more time - such as this map of public spending (created using Adobe Illustrator) or this Twitter riots interactive. The inverted pyramid of data journalism I’ve been working for some time on picking apart the many processes which make up what we call data journalism. Indeed, if you read the chapter on data journalism (blogged draft) in my Online Journalism Handbook, or seen me speak on the subject, you’ll have seen my previous diagram that tries to explain those processes. I’ve now revised that considerably, and what I’ve come up with bears some explanation.

The top 20 data visualisation tools One of the most common questions I get asked is how to get started with data visualisations. Beyond following blogs, you need to practise – and to practise, you need to understand the tools available. In this article, I want to introduce you to 20 different tools for creating visualisations: from simple charts to complex graphs, maps and infographics.

Related:  Data Journalism