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The Odyssey Teaching Resources

The Odyssey Teaching Resources
Related:  The Odssey lesson plans9th gd

Odyssey Lesson Plans Lesson Plans These lesson plans were designed to teach the Odyssey to 9th grade honors students. Teaching the Odyssey is an "Odyssey" in the work of teaching and requires dedication, determination, and some of the versatility one finds in Odysseus. A teacher should keep in mind that the Odyssey is comprised of twenty-four books or chapters. These "books" give students a view of a different culture and this vantage point enables them to get a new perspective on their own culture. For some reason students tend to be more open toward different cultures in the past than in the present. Completing the Odyssey helps build students' self-esteem although they may be intimidated by the task at the beginning. Along with taking notes, students also need to be taught how to use their notes to support their answers. Parents of my honors students have supported this ambitious unit. Samples of assignments are included in these lesson plans. Beginning the Odyssey: First Assignment: Book three test: 1.

People and Places of the Odyssey As of July 1, 2013 ThinkQuest has been discontinued. We would like to thank everyone for being a part of the ThinkQuest global community: Students - For your limitless creativity and innovation, which inspires us all. Teachers - For your passion in guiding students on their quest. Partners - For your unwavering support and evangelism. Parents - For supporting the use of technology not only as an instrument of learning, but as a means of creating knowledge. We encourage everyone to continue to “Think, Create and Collaborate,” unleashing the power of technology to teach, share, and inspire. Best wishes, The Oracle Education Foundation

The Odyssey Book 9 Vocabulary flashcards Sorry, the Quizlet database appears to be down. We've been notified of the problem, and are working on fixing it. Please try back in ten minutes or so. While you wait, you might enjoy learning vocabulary on FreeRice.com. L’Odyssée, Chant 24 L’Iliade et l’Odyssée dans la traduction de Jean-Baptiste Dugas-Montbel L’Iliade : Chant 1 • Chant 2 • Chant 3 • Chant 4 • Chant 5 • Chant 6 • Chant 7 • Chant 8 • Chant 9 • Chant 10 • Chant 11 • Chant 12 • Chant 13 • Chant 14 • Chant 15 • Chant 16 • Chant 17 • Chant 18 • Chant 19 • Chant 20 • Chant 21 • Chant 22 • Chant 23 • Chant 24L’Odyssée : Chant 1 • Chant 2 • Chant 3 • Chant 4 • Chant 5 • Chant 6 • Chant 7 • Chant 8 • Chant 9 • Chant 10 • Chant 11 • Chant 12 • Chant 13 • Chant 14 • Chant 15 • Chant 16 • Chant 17 • Chant 18 • Chant 19 • Chant 20 • Chant 21 • Chant 22 • Chant 23 • Chant 24 Les Libations. Ulysse et ses compagnons, mosaïque du musée du Bardo à Tunis Cependant Hermès Cyllénien rassemble les âmes des prétendants ; il tient en ses mains une belle baguette d’or, dont il peut à son gré fermer les yeux des hommes, ou les arracher au sommeil : il s’en sert pour conduire les âmes ; celles-ci le suivent avec un léger frémissement. L’âme d’Agamemnon répondit en ces mots : « Ah !

Random House Academic Resources Guide Contents: Note to Teachers Preparing to read For in-class discussion: I. Comprehension II. For further study Expanding your knowledge: I. Note to teachers This teacher's guide is keyed to the Robert Fitzgerald translation of The Odyssey. Little is certain when it comes to the origins of The Odyssey or its partner epic, The Iliad, the prequel, we would now call it, to The Odyssey in the legendary story of the Greek expedition to reclaim Helen from the city of Troy. There must have been many signal events, many great moments in the history of epic before The Iliad and The Odyssey achieved the forms in which we know them, but two appear, in retrospect, to have been supremely significant. The legendary campaign against Troy took ten years. The other signal moment in the development of the two Homeric poems seems to have fallen in the eighth century B.C.E., for reasons that are hard to pin down. For how long, no one can say. Preparing to read For in-class discussion I. II.

Odyssey Though, Penelope was comfort with the news of the beggar, she dismissed such hope. The next day in the banquet hall, Penelope had decided to take one of the suitors as her husband, if that suitor could string Odysseus' bow and shoot an arrow through rings of twelve axes in a row. According to Homer, he tells that Iphitus had given the bow to Odysseus, when the hero was a young man. Telemachus saw the advantage of taking his revenge upon the suitors, said that he would see if he was strong enough to string his father's bow. While the suitors were unsuccessfully trying to string the bow, Odysseus revealed himself to two faithful servants, Eumaeus the swineherd and Philoetius the cowman. When all the suitors had failed the test, to string the bow, Odysseus offered to try stringing the bow. Receiving the bow, Odysseus effortlessly strung the bow, plucking the string as if he was tuning the lute. The suitors panic, as Odysseus shot down the suitors with his deadly arrows.

Historical Background As of July 1, 2013 ThinkQuest has been discontinued. We would like to thank everyone for being a part of the ThinkQuest global community: Students - For your limitless creativity and innovation, which inspires us all. Teachers - For your passion in guiding students on their quest. Partners - For your unwavering support and evangelism. Parents - For supporting the use of technology not only as an instrument of learning, but as a means of creating knowledge. We encourage everyone to continue to “Think, Create and Collaborate,” unleashing the power of technology to teach, share, and inspire. Best wishes, The Oracle Education Foundation Les crimes et les peines - Jules Loiseleur Les représailles, seule loi pénale des temps héroïques. — Sentiment des tragiques grecs sur ce point. — Réglementation de l'exil. — Transformation de la composition facultative. — Bouclier d'Achille. — Premier exemple connu d'une composition sur un meurtre et d'un jugement régulier ; doute sur l'authenticité du passage de l'Iliade où ils sont relatés. — Supplices tirés des poèmes homériques. — Châtiments habituels de certains crimes. — Conformité de la législation pénale des Grecs et des Hébreux relative à l'adultère ; conséquence de cette analogie. — Composition sur ce crime. — Pourquoi l'adultère est le premier crime qui ait eu une pénalité régulière. — L'amour, sentiment absolument ignoré des Grecs. — État des femmes dans la société grecque ; répression de leurs écarts envisagée comme une nécessité sociale. La Grèce, dans les temps héroïques, n'a guère connu d'autre loi pénale que celle des représailles. Celui qui tue ses ennemis est libre de tout forfait , dit Euripide. Ah ! ....

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