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AI WEIWEI: NEVER SORRY, a film by Alison Klayman

AI WEIWEI: NEVER SORRY, a film by Alison Klayman
home . about the film Ai Weiwei is China's most famous international artist, and its most outspoken domestic critic. Against a backdrop of strict censorship and an unresponsive legal system, Ai expresses himself and organizes people through art and social media. In response, Chinese authorities have shut down his blog, beat him up, bulldozed his newly built studio, and held him in secret detention. AI WEIWEI: NEVER SORRY is the inside story of a dissident for the digital age who inspires global audiences and blurs the boundaries of art and politics. First-time director Alison Klayman gained unprecedented access to Ai while working as a journalist in China.

http://aiweiweineversorry.com/

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Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau (see name pronunciation; July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, and historian. A leading transcendentalist,[2] Thoreau is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay Resistance to Civil Government (also known as Civil Disobedience), an argument for disobedience to an unjust state. Thoreau's books, articles, essays, journals, and poetry total over 20 volumes. Among his lasting contributions are his writings on natural history and philosophy, where he anticipated the methods and findings of ecology and environmental history, two sources of modern-day environmentalism. Name pronunciation and physical appearance[edit] In appearance he was homely, with a nose that he called "my most prominent feature

Shocked by Paul McCarthy's butt plug? You obviously haven't seen his phallic Pinocchio Anality is in the eye of the beholder. An inflatable sculpture by American artist Paul McCarthy has been vandalised – and the artist himself assaulted – after a flurry of outrage in Paris over a sculpture that is said to resemble a type of sex toy known, I am informed, as a butt plug. I feel old fashioned that I had to be told that. Howard Zinn Life and career[edit] Early life[edit] Zinn was born to a Jewish immigrant family in Brooklyn. His father, Eddie Zinn, born in Austria-Hungary, emigrated to the U.S. with his brother Samuel before the outbreak of World War I.

Guus Hendrickx - Outlook Web App Type the email address of the account you want to sign in with. We're having trouble locating your account. Which type of account do you want to use? Sign in to Office 365 Stephen Fry Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, actor, writer, presenter, and activist. After a troubled childhood and adolescence, during which he was expelled from two schools and spent three months in prison for credit card fraud, he secured a place at Queens' College, Cambridge, where he studied English literature. While at university, Fry became involved with the Cambridge Footlights, where he met his long-time collaborator Hugh Laurie. As half of the comic double act Fry and Laurie, he co-wrote and co-starred in A Bit of Fry & Laurie, and took the role of Jeeves (with Laurie playing Wooster) in Jeeves and Wooster.

2014: the year British art became irrelevant Something faded to grey in British art in 2014. A spark of vitality went out. The avant garde became docile, introspective and irrelevant. Artists no longer shocked anyone, but instead elicited a po-faced respect, like the feeling of awe that men with white vans elicit in Ed Miliband. Does art have to shock? Of course not.

Americans Who Tell The Truth Biography | Statement 2012 | Statement 2004 Robert Shetterly was born in 1946 in Cincinnati, Ohio. He graduated in 1969 from Harvard College with a degree in English Literature. At Harvard he took some courses in drawing which changed the direction of his creative life -- from the written word to the image. Also, during this time, he was active in Civil Rights and in the Anti-Vietnam War movement. Why a charcoal of police in Ferguson is the most important artwork of 2014 2014 has produced horrific politics. Racism has returned, that hydra-headed idiot, everywhere from Missouri to Rochester, where a Ukip candidate won a byelection after openly speculating about repatriating Europeans. It is not much by way of compensation to say the year also produced a mighty piece of political art.

Credits – Priya's Shakti Ram DevineniDirector, Producer & Co-Writer A filmmaker, publisher and founder of Rattapallax films, press and magazine based in New York City, Sao Paulo and New Delhi. He produced, edited and directed the feature documentary The Human Tower, which was shot in India, Chile, and Spain. Recently, he produced Amir Naderi’s feature film, Vegas: Based on a True Story, which premiered at the Venice & Tribeca Film Festivals. Devineni is one of the founding partners of Academia Internacional de Cinema, the first independent film school in Brazil. George Grosz's dada drawings show how the first world war upended art Art changed for ever in August 1914. We will soon be hearing a lot about the first world war as we hit the centenary of its start: the folly that led a peaceful world to destruction, the devastating descent into the quagmire of the trenches, the horrors of gas and barbed wire. The impact on art is less likely to fill anniversary commemorations. A remarkable exhibition at the Richard Nagy gallery on Old Bond Street, London, George Grosz's Berlin: Prostitutes, Politicians, Profiteers, reveals how brutalising and yet horribly energising that artistic impact was.

Learn to Fight Capitalism at the School of Disobedience Jani Leinonen, “School of Disobedience” (2015) (courtesy the artist) A forthcoming exhibition in Helsinki will offer visitors an education grounded in disobedience and protest, equipping them with tools and ideas to challenge society’s injustices and fight for change. The School of Disobedience, which opens on September 4 at Finland’s contemporary art museum, Kiasma, is part art show, part educational institution: visitors to the museum are treated as students, receiving lessons from the more than 100 works on view or through a series of workshops with curricula that encourage civil disobedience through different media. Conceived by Finnish artist Jani Leinonen, whose own work is very critical of capitalist systems, the school intends to instill in the public — particularly young people — an urgent desire for social justice. Jani Leinonen, “School of Disobedience,” 2015 (courtesy the artist) (click to enlarge) Will New Guggenheim Force Closing of Helsinki Art Museums?

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