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Lessons

Lessons

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Top 10 Science Websites for the Elementary Classroom For two years, I was the Technology Specialist at a school in Georgia. During that time, I amassed a large collection of websites that I use with my students. You can download my E-Book of Websites for the Elementary Classroom for free from Teachers Pay Teachers or Smashwords, or, you can check back here each week for the website suggestion. For the past two months, I have been busy re-working my Internet Scavenger Hunts.

Solar System Science Fair Project Science Fair Projects Solar System 3D Simulator is a FREE software application that generates a realistic solar system model and planets in 3 Dimension on the PC using advanced physics formulas. It can display the planets and their orbits, the sun and the moon. The nine planets including planet earth and their detailed physical & chemical information and image pictures is also displayed including solar power, solar energy and solar eclipse details. The graphical output is in high-resolution 3D full color format and the orbit view can be adjusted and the orbits tilted & rotated to any angle. The speed of the solar system can also be varied.The Solar System model is useful for learning about the physics of the universe, astronomy, science projects & science experiments interactively for both adults and kids. Students of Elementary, Middle and High School can use it for science fair projects ideas, physics help, science news & creating science articles.

Christmas science projects In this issue: Crystal Snowflake ProjectFrosted Window Panes ProjectFun FactsSilly ScienceWay Cool WebsitesScience WordsPrintable pdf Are you dreaming of a white Christmas? With these crystal-growing projects, you don't need snow or even freezing temperatures to enjoy a festive white Christmas this year! Use common household items to grow two different types of crystals for a sparkly snowflake ornament and frosted window panes that are sure to make your days merry and bright. Discover the world's most endangered species Wildscreen's Arkive project was launched in 2003 and grew to become the world's biggest encyclopaedia of life on Earth. With the help of over 7,000 of the world’s best wildlife filmmakers and photographers, conservationists and scientists, Arkive.org featured multi-media fact-files for more than 16,000 endangered species. Freely accessible to everyone, over half a million people every month, from over 200 countries, used Arkive to learn and discover the wonders of the natural world. Since 2013 Wildscreen was unable to raise sufficient funds from trusts, foundations, corporates and individual donors to support the year-round costs of keeping Arkive online. Therefore, the charity had been using its reserves to keep the project online and was unable to fund any dedicated staff to maintain Arkive, let alone future-proof it, for over half a decade.

Beyond 2012: Why the World Didn't End Beyond 2012: Why the World Didn't End If you're reading this story, it means the world didn't end on Dec. 21, 2012. Despite reports of an ancient Maya prophecy, a mysterious planet on a collision course with Earth, or a reverse in Earth's rotation, we're still here. The Mayan connection "was a misconception from the very beginning," says Dr. John Carlson, director of the Center for Archaeoastronomy. Physics For Kids Does your child know what the periodic table is? Do they understand gravity, magnetism or states of matter? Do they know who Isaac Newton is and all about Newton's law of motion? Molecular Workbench Three Views of MW Senior Scientist and Molecular Workbench Developer Charles Xie, Researcher and Manager Amy Pallant, and Technology and Curriculum Developer Dan Damelin describe the history of Molecular Workbench and our vision for the future. Watch the Video

50 Years of Incredible Space Images From the European Southern Observatory This week marks the 50th anniversary of one of the world’s leading astronomical institutions, the European Southern Observatory. In honor of ESO’s birthday, we take a look at some of its most stunning shots of the night sky, amazing objects in space, and the organization's beautiful telescope facilities. ESO started when astronomers from five European countries – Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden – came together on Oct. 5, 1962 to build a telescope in the Southern Hemisphere. Having a large telescope south of the equator gave these member states access to unprecedented clear skies and celestial objects that simply can’t be seen from the Northern Hemisphere, such as the Magellanic Clouds. Over the decades, many more countries have joined, including Denmark, Switzerland, Italy, Portugal, the United Kingdom, Finland, Spain, the Czech Republic, Austria, and, in 2010, Brazil, which became the first non-European state to join.

Heelan Science Welcome! On this website you should find all of the materials you need for Physics, Honors Physics, Chemistry Principles, and AP biology courses at Bishop Heelan Catholic High School in Sioux City, Iowa. Use the navigation bar to the left to view the particular class and unit you're interested in. USA Hands-On Universe USA-HOU is hosting the Global HOU conference this year at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Kentucky, 15-21 August 2017, in the path of totality of the 21 August 2017 American Solar Eclipse! See the conference website and list of participants (not all on the list actually attended). See maps of the eclipse’s path of totality. Hands-On Universe (HOU) is an educational program that enables students to investigate the Universe while applying tools and concepts from science, math, and technology.

Web 2.0 Science Tools By Laura Turner The following web2.0 sites would be useful for science educators at the high school and middle school level. Some would also be appropriate for higher elementary grade levels. About NEED More than 30 years ago, the NEED Project began as a one-day celebration of energy education when National Energy Education Day was recognized by a Joint Congressional Resolution. In the same year, President Jimmy Carter issued a Presidential Proclamation stressing the need for comprehensive energy education in our schools, a reduction of our dependence of fossil fuels, and increasing use of renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency. Since its founding, NEED has kept its Kids Teaching Kids philosophy as a fundamental principle of NEED programming – encouraging students to explore, experiment and engage and encouraging teachers to embrace student leadership in the classroom. NEED trains and assists teachers in harnessing the energy of the classroom – the energy of students. NEED is expanding and evolving to best meet the needs of teachers and students – in the classroom and beyond.

66 Lessons on the Chemistry of Food and Beverages Reactions is a YouTube channel that I've mentioned in a handful of posts in the past. The channel is produced by PBS Digital Studios and the American Chemical Society. All of the videos on the channel include chemistry lessons based on ordinary, everyday parts of life like food and beverages. In fact, Reactions has a playlist of sixty-six videos that teach short lessons about the chemistry of food and beverages. Some highlights from that playlist include 3 Egg-cellently Weird Science Experiments, Why is Pizza so Good? and Why Does Stinky Cheese Stink?

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