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Content Curation for Teachers 

Content Curation for Teachers 
Have you ever felt that there is simply too much interesting, educational content on the web? Fortunately, there are also some great, free products that help learners curate all of the many things they can read, watch, hear etc. on the web. The beauty of taking control of your content by saving and organizing links is that you can quickly find, revisit or share content with others. By curating the web, one can essentially build up a library of data in the cloud for free. I know personally as a history teacher, I spend a lot of time surfing the web when I prepare lessons. In addition, through my own exploration of the web and thanks in large part due to services like Twitter, Google Plus, Stumble Upon, and YouTube, I come across things that I want to teach my students in the future. The content curation tools that I have found most useful are Pearltrees, Diigo and Evernote. 1. 2. 3. Personal Use: Evernote is a slightly different service than the previously noted applications. Nate Green

http://www.edsocialmedia.com/2012/01/content-curation-for-teachers/

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Jeff Jarvis on what I’ve been beginning to call “The Content Creator’s Dilemma” [From a previous Amplify curation post.] Jeff Jarvis is pointing out several excellent recent examples of changing journalism practices in the age of the Real-Time Web, and ever more rapid Content Decay (that’s why they call it “old news”…). Is the news article becoming a luxury, and mere byproduct of other, larger reporting and #Curation efforts? I’ve been meaning to write a longer post about what has been forming in my mind under the preliminary heading “The Content Creator’s Dilemma”, but… I haven’t found the time yet given the rapid-fire progression of topics in technology, in social media, in #dinomedia, etc. that I also wanted to at least curate here on Amplify to stay approximately “caught up”. So shall we now add to the recent idiom “TL;DR” (Too Long; Didn’t Read), its mirror, “Too Long; Didn’t Write”?!

4 Promising Curation Tools That Help Make Sense of the Web Steven Rosenbaum is a curator, author, filmmaker and entrepreneur. He is the CEO of Magnify.net, a real-time video curation engine for publishers, brands, and websites. His book Curation Nation is slated to be published this spring by McGrawHill Business. As the volume of content swirling around the web continues to grow, we're finding ourselves drowning in a deluge of data. Is Content Curation in Your Skill Set? It Should Be. by David Kelly “Curation is an important skill to develop, especially in an environment in which more and more organizations shift towards self-directed learning for their workers. Now is the time for learning and performance professionals to develop this new skill set.” Curation is a term that is rapidly growing in popularity and is directly impacting the world of workplace learning and performance. In a world where the amount of information available to workers doubles every 18 to 24 months, it is impossible to keep up with the seemingly endless supply of it. In his book Curation Nation, Steven Rosenbaum describes it this way: “Curation replaces noise with clarity. And it’s the clarity of your choosing; it’s the things that people you trust help you find.”

Pearltrees Raises $6.7M For Its “Collaborative Interest Graph” Pearltrees, a company offering a novel interface for sharing and finding content, has raised 5 million euros ($6.7 million US) in new funding. The basic unit of the Pearltrees service is the pearl, which is basically a bookmark. Users can assemble these pearls into trees based around a topic. Meanwhile, Pearltrees is using that data to determine how different topics and bookmarks are related, and allows users to find new pearls (related to whatever topic they’re exploring) through its “related interests” button. Following the lead from Google’s PageRank and Facebook’s EdgeRank, Pearltrees has named its technology TreeRank.

The Best Online Tools for Content Curation A content curation tool lets you pull videos, images, presentations, tweets, blog posts and other web content into a bundle which you can then easily embed and share on the web. Let’s say your team has just launched a new product at some conference and they have asked you to collate all the conversations and buzz happening around that product on various websites, blogs and social sites. You have to act fast because the stuff that gets shared on the real-time web often gets buried almost as quickly. So how should you go about collecting stuff around the Internet?

What Is a Curator in Chief? Neil Sanderson is the Chief Curator at Eqentia--a software platform service that enables professional users and organizations to easily aggregate, curate and republish the news that's important to them. Eqentia's sites are both public and private--with some of the more public ones including Visability Marketing (visabilitymarketing.com) and Slices of Boulder (slicesofboulder.com) which is a local news website for Boulder, Colorado. More than 50 of the portals can be found at portal.eqentia.com/channels. I asked Neil what a 'Chief Curator' does. "It's much like being an Editor, except that I do not commission original reporting or writing." And Neil went on to explain that his job has three main tasks; finding, managing filters, and providing human curation.

Dead Link! The Human Algorithm When I became a reporter, almost 20 years ago, my job was to dig up scarce, precious facts and deliver them to a passive audience. Today, scarcity has been replaced by an unimaginable surplus and that audience is actively building its own newsroom. Journalists the world over are struggling to cope with a social and mobile tsunami of ‘user generated content’, to use an increasingly inadequate phrase. Twitter and YouTube will overwhelm news organisations who can’t master their potential. A common mistake for those seeking to cope with this profound disruption is to confuse technology with innovation. Algorithms, apps and search tools help make data useful but they can’t replace the value judgements at the core of journalism. Science and Curation: the New Practice of Web 2.0 The Internet now makes it possible to publish and share billions of data items every day, accessible to over 2 billion people worldwide. This mass of information makes it difficult, when searching, to extract the relevant and useful information from the background noise. It should be added that these searches are time-consuming and can take much longer than the time we actually have to spend on them. Today, Google and specialized search engines such as Google Scholar are based on established algorithms.

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