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Content Curation for Teachers 

Have you ever felt that there is simply too much interesting, educational content on the web? Fortunately, there are also some great, free products that help learners curate all of the many things they can read, watch, hear etc. on the web. The beauty of taking control of your content by saving and organizing links is that you can quickly find, revisit or share content with others. By curating the web, one can essentially build up a library of data in the cloud for free. I know personally as a history teacher, I spend a lot of time surfing the web when I prepare lessons. In addition, through my own exploration of the web and thanks in large part due to services like Twitter, Google Plus, Stumble Upon, and YouTube, I come across things that I want to teach my students in the future. The content curation tools that I have found most useful are Pearltrees, Diigo and Evernote. 1. 2. 3. Personal Use: Evernote is a slightly different service than the previously noted applications. Nate Green Related:  Curadoria

Pearltrees Raises $6.7M For Its “Collaborative Interest Graph” Pearltrees, a company offering a novel interface for sharing and finding content, has raised 5 million euros ($6.7 million US) in new funding. The basic unit of the Pearltrees service is the pearl, which is basically a bookmark. Users can assemble these pearls into trees based around a topic. Meanwhile, Pearltrees is using that data to determine how different topics and bookmarks are related, and allows users to find new pearls (related to whatever topic they’re exploring) through its “related interests” button. Following the lead from Google’s PageRank and Facebook’s EdgeRank, Pearltrees has named its technology TreeRank. Pearltrees launched in December 2009, and the company says it has been growing consistently at 15 percent per month, and that users have now created 15 million pearls which were assembled into 2 million trees. Previous investor Groupe Accueil led the new round.

4 Promising Curation Tools That Help Make Sense of the Web Steven Rosenbaum is a curator, author, filmmaker and entrepreneur. He is the CEO of Magnify.net, a real-time video curation engine for publishers, brands, and websites. His book Curation Nation is slated to be published this spring by McGrawHill Business. As the volume of content swirling around the web continues to grow, we're finding ourselves drowning in a deluge of data. The solution on the horizon is curation. In the past 90 days alone, there has been an explosion of new software offerings that are the early leaders in the curation tools category. 1. Storify co-founder Burt Herman worked as a reporter for the Associated Press during a 12-year career, six of those in news management as a bureau chief and supervising correspondent. At the AP, editors sending messages to reporters asking them to do a story would regularly write, “Can u pls storify?” Storify uses existing elements from the web and gives curators the power to drag and drop elements into storylines. 2. 3. 4. Conclusion

Infographic Tutorial What is an Infographic? Source: Hot Button Studio Source: Infographics Archive How to make an infographic Step 1: Determine what data you want to include in your graphic Step 2: Use Easel.ly to create an infographic Here's a tutorial on using Easel.ly: Be sure to include your sources! Think carefully about what messages your design sends--are they the messages you intended? Other tools for creating infographics: Content Curation with PearlTrees Note: This post is also cross-posted over at the EasyBib blog. I’ve written and spoken before about the essential skill (a literacy according to Howard Rheingold) of students not only being able to collect content from their network(s), but to curate what’s collected. Just like a museum curator pours over artifacts to find the very best to display, we should also do the same not just for our own professional resources, but see it as an obligation to model it for our students. I came across a new resource recently (I believe the hat tip goes to Alec Couros for this find) called Pearltrees. Once you’ve signed up for your account, you will already have your “root” Pearltree created for you with your username. You will also see there that I have created a Pearltree called Digital Citizenship. As you noticed above you can share links to specific Pearltrees in your account and also embed any Pearltree you’d like on your own website, blog, LMS, etc. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Like this: Like Loading...

The 5 Models Of Content Curation Curation has always been an underrated form of creation. The Getty Center in Los Angeles is one of the most frequently visited museums in America – and started as a private art collection from one man (J. Paul Getty) who had a passion for art. Aside from a few well known examples like this one, however, the term curation has rarely been used outside of the world of art … until now. One of the hottest trends in social media right now is content curation – thanks in no small part to the leading efforts of several thought leaders actively promoting the idea. What Is Content Curation? Back in 2009 I published a blog post called the “Manifesto For The Content Curator” which predicted that this role would be one of the fastest growing and most important jobs of the future. Content Curation is a term that describes the act of finding, grouping, organizing or sharing the best and most relevant content on a specific issue. The 5 Models Of Content Curation Additional Posts About Content Curation:

7 Ideas for Using Twitter in the Classroom This post assumes you already know the basics of how to use Twitter. You know what a hashtag is and what purpose an @mention serves. If you need a general overview of how Twitter works and why it’s useful for teachers, we recommend starting here. You can also consult the Graphite review of Twitter, as well as the many teacher Field Notes about Twitter on Graphite. Many educators are using Twitter in new and exciting ways with their students. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Twitter’s super-short format doesn’t mean it's short on learning potential. Subjects & Skills (click to expand) Patrice Lamothe (Pearltrees) im Interview: Content-Organisation made in France Die Organisation digitaler Inhalte dürfte heute wichtiger sein denn je und die Liste entsprechender Organisationsdienste ist nicht nur lang, sondern auch vielfältig. Eben jenem Thema der Content-Organisation hat sich auch Pearltrees verschrieben, ein französisches StartUp, das, obwohl es monatlich bis zu acht Millionen Pageviews vorweisen kann, in Deutschland bisher eher mäßig bekannt ist, aber den europäischen Durchbruch angehen will. Der Name deutet es bereits an: Bei Pearltrees geht es um Perlen, die mit Inhalten verknüpft in Baumstrukturen angeordnet werden und den Zugriff auf die eigenen Inhalte erleichtern sollen. Ganz im Stile von Anwendungen wie Prezi lassen sich mit Hilfe des französischen Dienstes Content-Pfade anlegen, die natürlich auch mit anderen Nutzern entsprechend geteilt und ergänzt werden können. Film ab! Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Twitter and the Anti-Playstation Effect on War Coverage As I follow the remarkable political transformations ongoing in the Middle East and North Africa through social media, I’m struck by the depth of the difference between news curation and anchoring on Twitter versus Television. In this post, I’d like to argue that Television functions as a distancing technology while social media works in the opposite direction: through transparency of the process of narrative construction, through immediacy of the intermediaries, through removal of censorship over images and stories (television never shows the truly horrific pictures of war), and through person-to-person interactivity, social media news curation creates a sense of visceral and intimate connectivity, in direct contrast to television, which is explicitly constructed to separate the viewer from the events. Although it is the first factor most people think of, I believe that the distancing effect of TV isn’t just because TV is broadcast and social media is interactive.

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