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Derinkuyu Underground City

Derinkuyu Underground City
Derinkuyu Underground City is an ancient multi-level underground city of the Median Empire in the Derinkuyu district in Nevşehir Province, Turkey. Extending to a depth of approximately 60 m, it was large enough to shelter approximately 20,000 people together with their livestock and food stores. It is the largest excavated underground city in Turkey and is one of several underground complexes found across Cappadocia.[citation needed] It was opened to visitors in 1969 and to date, about half of the underground city is accessible to tourists. Features[edit] One of the heavy stone doors. The underground city at Derinkuyu could be closed from the inside with large stone doors. The city could accommodate up to 20,000 people and had all the usual amenities found in other underground complexes[citation needed] across Cappadocia, such as wine and oil presses, stables, cellars, storage rooms, refectories, and chapels. Between the third and fourth levels is a vertical staircase. History[edit] Related:  Ancient Civilizations

Cueva de los Tayos Cueva de los Tayos Cueva de los Tayos (Spanish, "Cave of the Oilbirds") is a natural cave located on the eastern slopes of the Andes mountains in the Morona-Santiago province of Ecuador. It is sometimes called Cueva de los Tayos de Coangos (the Río Coangos is nearby), presumably to distinguish it from other oilbird-containing caves with similar names. Description[edit] Located at an elevation of about 800 m within thinly-bedded limestone and shale, the principal entrance to Cueva de Los Tayos is within rainforest at the bottom of a dry valley. The cave has long been used by the native Jivaro Indians who descend into the cave each spring using vine ladders and bamboo torches to collect fledgeling tayos (the nocturnal Steatornis caripensis). Von Däniken popularizes the cave[edit] The Gold of the Gods[edit] The 1976 Expedition[edit] As a result of the claims published in von Däniken’s book, an investigation of Cueva de los Tayos was organized by Stan Hall from Britain in 1976. References[edit]

Göbekli Tepe The function of the structures is not yet clear. The most common opinion, shared by excavator Klaus Schmidt, is that they are early neolithic sanctuaries. Discovery[edit] The site was first noted in a survey conducted by Istanbul University and the University of Chicago in 1963. In 1994, Klaus Schmidt, now of the German Archaeological Institute, who had previously been working at Nevalı Çori, was looking for another site to lead a dig. The following year, he began excavating there in collaboration with the Şanlıurfa Museum. Dating[edit] View of site and excavation The imposing stratigraphy of Göbekli Tepe attests to many centuries of activity, beginning at least as early as the epipaleolithic, or Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA), in the 10th millennium BC. There are a number of radiocarbon dates (presented with one standard deviation errors and calibrations to BCE): The Hd samples are from charcoal in the lowest levels of the site and would date the active phase of occupation. Plateau[edit]

Perihelion 1. Planet at aphelion 2. Planet at perihelion 3. Sun The perihelion is the point in the orbit of a planet, asteroid or comet where it is nearest to the sun. The word perihelion stems from the Greek words "peri," meaning near, and "Helios," meaning the Greek god of the sun. All planets, comets and asteroids in our solar system have approximately elliptical (a kind of non-circular) orbits (any single revolution of a body around the sun is only approximately elliptical, because the phenomenon known as precession of the perihelion prevents the orbit from being a simple closed curve such as an ellipse). Earth comes closest to the sun every year around January 3. When Earth is closest to the sun, it is winter in the northern hemisphere and summer in the southern hemisphere.

Derinkuyu Derinkuyu is a town and district of Nevşehir Province in the Central Anatolia region of Turkey. According to 2010 census, population of the district is 22,114 of which 10,679 live in the town of Derinkuyu.[3][4] The district covers an area of 445 km2 (172 sq mi),[5] and the average elevation is 1,300 m (4,265 ft), with the highest point being Mt. Ertaş at 1,988 m (6,522 ft). Located in Cappadocia, Derinkuyu is notable for its large multi-level underground city (Derinkuyu Underground City), which is a major tourist attraction. The historical region of Cappadocia, where Derinkuyu is situated, contains several historical underground cities, carved out of a unique geological formation. They are not generally occupied. History[edit] See also[edit] Notes[edit] References[edit] External links[edit] Coordinates:

Tahtzibichen Labyrinth Ancient Temple Originally submitted by coldrum. A slightly different article --- To enter Maya underworld, Xibalbá, a tortuous road had to be walked; at the end, according to Popol Vuh, the sacred Maya book, there was a lake with houses, where hard tests had to be accomplished. National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) and Autonomous University of Yucatan (UADY) archaeologists think they may have found this legendary route inside caves and cenotes (sinkholes). Several constructions have been discovered in these underground spaces. Guillermo de Anda Alanis, director of El Culto al Cenote en el Centro de Yucatan (Cult to Cenote in Central Yucatan) initiative, revealed that finding these buildings has been a pleasant surprise, as they seem to corroborate what historical sources described. “Caves have been modified to house temples probably dedicated to Xibalba cult; considering they are located in hard to reach places, buildings are complex, some shafts reaching 30 or 40 meters long.”

Popol Vuh (The Mayan Bible) with its’ first inhabitants was destroyed by a great disaster. The water, the stillness, the disorder and the darkness that we see in Genesis 1:2 is the result of the first destruction by whatever means. From Genesis chapter 1, verse 2 forward, we read of a new creation, the creation of our present world. As to the previously posed question of “light”, may I suggest that as the clouds of water vapor from the first destruction dissipated, that the sun, moon, and stars of verse 14, once again cast their previous life giving light and warmth over the surface of this planet we call “home”. All of this has been said in order to give credibility to the possibility that much of the cosmogenesis found in the Popol-Vuh may in fact, have a basis in truth. My Translation of the Popol Vuh Follows: (Quiché Mayan BOOK OF THE CREATION) English translation from the Spanish text by Dr. (all rights reserved, 2000) true to the Spanish text, suitable for an in depth English study of the original. -Dr. Chapter 3

Black Mountain, Australia undefined Excerpt from branton's CAVERNS, DUNGEONS & LABYRINTHS The 'I.N.F.O. JOURNAL' (box 367., Arlington, VA, 22210), a publication devoted to 'Fortean' research, Vol. IV, No. 2 issue, related one of the most frightening and disturbing accounts of subterranean abduction that we have come across yet. "Black Mountain comes almost as a shock when you see it first. "Traveling by bus just south of Cooktown, North Queensland (Australia), a bend in the road suddenly discloses it and the visual impact can bring an involuntary exclamation, as you see it -- black, bare and sinister, a 1,000 ft. high pile of enormous boulders two miles long, rearing out of the rain-forest. "This is 'the Mountain of Death.' "The rocks give off a curious metallic ring when struck, and the only sound is the croaking of countless frogs sheltered in the depths where the great granite boulders lie against each other. "In Brisbane's Public Library, a yellowing newspaper cutting tells some of the story:

Black Mountain (Kalkajaka) National Park Black Mountain (Kalkajaka) National Park is a 781 hectare [1]protected area in the Queensland, (Australia), 25 km south west of Cooktown. It is managed and protected as a national park under the Nature Conservation Act 1992. The main feature of the park is the mass of granite boulders, some the size of houses. The area has a bad reputation as numerous people and those searching for the missing have disappeared without trace. The national park's distinctive hard granite boulders and range originally formed out of magma that first slowly solidified under the Earth's crust about 250 million years ago.[3] The softer land surfaces above the solidified magma eroded away over time, leaving the magma's fractured top to be exposed as a mountain of grey granite boulders blackened by a film of microscopic blue-green algae growing on the exposed surfaces. There are at least four sites of religious or mythological significance on the mountain. Camping is not permitted in the park. Coordinates:

Anunnaki The Anunnaki (also transcribed as: Anunaki, Anunna, Anunnaku, Ananaki and other variations) are a group of deities in ancient Mesopotamian cultures (i.e. Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian). The name is variously written "da-nuna", "da-nuna-ke4-ne", or "da-nun-na", meaning something to the effect of "those of royal blood"[1] or "princely offspring".[2] According to The Oxford Companion to World Mythology, the Anunnaki "are the Sumerian deities of the old primordial line; they are chthonic deities of fertility, associated eventually with the underworld, where they became judges. Their relation to the group of gods known as the Igigi is unclear – at times the names are used synonymously but in the Atra-Hasis flood myth the Igigi are the sixth generation of the Gods who have to work for the Anunnaki, rebelling after 40 days and replaced by the creation of humans.[4] The Annunaki are mentioned in The Epic of Gilgamesh when Utnapishtim tells the story of the flood. Notes[edit]

Carnac stones The Ménec alignments, the most well-known megalithic site among the Carnac stones Stones in the Kerlescan alignments Although the stones date from 4500 BC, modern myths were formed which resulted from 1st century AD Roman and later Christian occupations, such as Saint Cornelius[3] – a Christian myth associated with the stones held that they were pagan soldiers in pursuit of Pope Cornelius when he turned them to stone.[4][5][6] Brittany has its own local versions of the Arthurian cycle. In recent centuries, many of the sites have been neglected, with reports of dolmens being used as sheep shelters, chicken sheds or even ovens.[7] Even more commonly, stones have been removed to make way for roads, or as building materials. Alignments[edit] There are three major groups of stone rows — Ménec, Kermario and Kerlescan — which may have once formed a single group, but have been split up as stones were removed for other purposes. Model of the Ménec alignment Ménec alignments[edit] Tumuli[edit] Moustoir

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