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Derinkuyu Underground City

Derinkuyu Underground City
Derinkuyu Underground City is an ancient multi-level underground city of the Median Empire in the Derinkuyu district in Nevşehir Province, Turkey. Extending to a depth of approximately 60 m, it was large enough to shelter approximately 20,000 people together with their livestock and food stores. It is the largest excavated underground city in Turkey and is one of several underground complexes found across Cappadocia.[citation needed] It was opened to visitors in 1969 and to date, about half of the underground city is accessible to tourists. Features[edit] One of the heavy stone doors. The underground city at Derinkuyu could be closed from the inside with large stone doors. The city could accommodate up to 20,000 people and had all the usual amenities found in other underground complexes[citation needed] across Cappadocia, such as wine and oil presses, stables, cellars, storage rooms, refectories, and chapels. Between the third and fourth levels is a vertical staircase. History[edit] Related:  Ancient Civilizations

Cueva de los Tayos Cueva de los Tayos Cueva de los Tayos (Spanish, "Cave of the Oilbirds") is a natural cave located on the eastern slopes of the Andes mountains in the Morona-Santiago province of Ecuador. It is sometimes called Cueva de los Tayos de Coangos (the Río Coangos is nearby), presumably to distinguish it from other oilbird-containing caves with similar names. Description[edit] Located at an elevation of about 800 m within thinly-bedded limestone and shale, the principal entrance to Cueva de Los Tayos is within rainforest at the bottom of a dry valley. The cave has long been used by the native Jivaro Indians who descend into the cave each spring using vine ladders and bamboo torches to collect fledgeling tayos (the nocturnal Steatornis caripensis). Von Däniken popularizes the cave[edit] The Gold of the Gods[edit] The 1976 Expedition[edit] As a result of the claims published in von Däniken’s book, an investigation of Cueva de los Tayos was organized by Stan Hall from Britain in 1976. References[edit]

Kaymaklı Underground City Template:Kurva city Kaymaklı Underground City is contained within the citadel of Kaymaklı in the Central Anatolia Region of Turkey. First opened to tourists in 1964, the village is about 19 km from Nevşehir, on the Nevşehir-Niğde road. The ancient name was Enegup. The houses in the village are constructed around the nearly one hundred tunnels of the underground city. The tunnels are still used today as storage areas, stables, and cellars. The underground city at Kaymaklı differs from Derinkuyu in terms of its structure and layout. A view showing several floors at once. A stable is located on the first floor. Located on the second floor is a church with a nave and two apses. A remarkable stone with several holes, used in cold copper processing. The third floor contains the most important areas of the underground compound: storage places, wine or oil presses, and kitchens. See also[edit] References[edit] Jump up ^ Nevşehir > Underground Settlements > Kaymakli Underground City Coordinates:

Archaeoacoustics MALTA: 1902 A construction worker unexpectedly broke through the bottom of a household cistern. A dark man-made cavity lay below. Descending over stone barriers into shadows, he found underground rooms opening up before him -- three stories of sculpted man-sized burrow suggesting some fantasy realm of Mother Earth. On the ceiling, painted tendrils and disk patterns of red ocher spin out from the entrance, ending just above the chin-level niche in the side wall. Sixty miles south of Sicily, in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, lies a small cluster of islands known today as Malta. The “Temple Period” spanned more than a thousand years of continuous building and elaboration, from about 3700 BC until around 2400 BC when the monuments seem to have been abruptly abandoned without explanation. There are more than thirty sites on the islands where it is known that megalithic temples once stood. Something was born here on these islands. Dr.

Hypogeum of Ħal-Saflieni The Hypogeum of Paola, Malta, (Ipoġew in Maltese) literally meaning "underground" in Greek, is a subterranean structure dating to the Saflieni phase (3000-2500 BC) in Maltese prehistory. Thought to have been originally a sanctuary, it became a necropolis in prehistoric times and the remains of more than 7,000 individuals have been found. It is the only known prehistoric underground temple in the world. The Hypogeum was depicted on a 2 cents 5 mils stamp issued in the Maltese Islands in 1980 to commemorate the acceptance by UNESCO of this unique structure in the World Heritage Site list. It was closed to visitors between 1992 and 1996 for restoration works; since it reopened only 60 people per day are allowed entry. It was discovered by accident in 1902 when workers cutting cisterns for a new housing development broke through its roof. First Level[edit] The first level is very similar to tombs found in Xemxija in Malta. Second Level[edit] Hal Saflieni The Main Chamber[edit] Third Level[edit]

Perihelion 1. Planet at aphelion 2. Planet at perihelion 3. Sun The perihelion is the point in the orbit of a planet, asteroid or comet where it is nearest to the sun. The word perihelion stems from the Greek words "peri," meaning near, and "Helios," meaning the Greek god of the sun. All planets, comets and asteroids in our solar system have approximately elliptical (a kind of non-circular) orbits (any single revolution of a body around the sun is only approximately elliptical, because the phenomenon known as precession of the perihelion prevents the orbit from being a simple closed curve such as an ellipse). Earth comes closest to the sun every year around January 3. When Earth is closest to the sun, it is winter in the northern hemisphere and summer in the southern hemisphere.

Derinkuyu Underground City In Derinkuyu Turkey there is an underground city with 11 levels. It's able to hold up to potentially 20 THOUSAND people. It has wine cellars, stables for livestock, and even what appear to be chapels. The openings to each level are guarded by a huge circular rock door that can be shut by a single person from the inside to keep people out. The opening in the center acts as a peep hole. "Derinkuyu Underground City is an ancient multi-level underground city of the Median Empire in the Derinkuyu district in Nevşehir Province, Turkey. They say it was built/ dug in the 6th or 7th century BC. I don't know about you but this is crazy to me! "First built in the soft volcanic rock of the Cappadocia region, possibly by the Phrygians in the 8th–7th centuries B.C. according to the Turkish Department of Culture, the underground city at Derinkuyu may have been enlarged in the Byzantine era. The most intriguing thing to me isn't what we've found, it's what we haven't.

5 Shockingly Advanced Ancient Buildings That Shouldn't Exist Back in the 1960s, surveyors in Turkey found an ancient buried complex composed of huge stone pillars arranged in a circle like Stonehenge, some of them 30 feet tall. What really knocked the monocles out of their eyes, however, was that this was much older than Stonehenge ... 6,000 years older. TeomancimitThe hieroglyphics translate to "First!" So those massive, ornate limestone pillars were carefully carved from a nearby quarry using hunks of flint rock and their bare hands. Having been dated to around 9000 B.C., Gobekli Tepe is thought to be the oldest human construction. That's further back than any of the ancient sites you learned about in history class. TeomancimitIt was truly the golden age for Big Bad Wolves. In fact, the site even predates agriculture, which means that the people who built it were still chasing mammoths rather than planting crops. WikipediaWhile riding a unicycle.

Pumapunku Coordinates: An example of high-precision small holes Stone blocks at Pumapunku Pumapunku or Puma Punku (Aymara and Quechua puma cougar, puma, punku door, hispanicized Puma Puncu) is part of a large temple complex or monument group that is part of the Tiwanaku Site near Tiwanaku, Bolivia. Tiwanaku is significant in Inca traditions because it is believed to be the site where the world was created.[1] In Aymara, Puma Punku's name means "The Door of the Puma". The Pumapunku is a terraced earthen mound that is faced with blocks. The other stonework and facing of the Pumapunku consists of a mixture of andesite and red sandstone. At its peak, Pumapunku is thought to have been "unimaginably wondrous",[3] adorned with polished metal plaques, brightly colored ceramic and fabric ornamentation, trafficked by costumed citizens, elaborately dressed priests and elites decked in exotic jewelry. Age[edit] Engineering[edit] Detail of stone with precisely cut straight line and tooled holes within the line

Tahtzibichen Labyrinth Ancient Temple Originally submitted by coldrum. A slightly different article --- To enter Maya underworld, Xibalbá, a tortuous road had to be walked; at the end, according to Popol Vuh, the sacred Maya book, there was a lake with houses, where hard tests had to be accomplished. National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) and Autonomous University of Yucatan (UADY) archaeologists think they may have found this legendary route inside caves and cenotes (sinkholes). Several constructions have been discovered in these underground spaces. Guillermo de Anda Alanis, director of El Culto al Cenote en el Centro de Yucatan (Cult to Cenote in Central Yucatan) initiative, revealed that finding these buildings has been a pleasant surprise, as they seem to corroborate what historical sources described. “Caves have been modified to house temples probably dedicated to Xibalba cult; considering they are located in hard to reach places, buildings are complex, some shafts reaching 30 or 40 meters long.”

A Healthy Garden With Half the Work Choose veggies that you can seed directly into the ground or into containers, such as peas, beans, radishes, carrots, lettuce, and Swiss chard. All are great growers that require minimal maintenance. Tomatoes, on the other hand, are picky when they're young. You're better off buying starters from a reliable supplier instead of seeding your own. Buy indeterminate varieties—they keep fruiting for as long as they want, whereas determinate varieties put out a fixed number and then call it quits. Some plants, such as asparagus and rhubarb, and some herbs, such as mint, oregano, and parsley, just keep growing year after year. Not-so-easy choices: roses, grapes, cane berries, raspberries, and blackberries, which all require pruning to fruit well the following season.

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